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So the waffle gives you better "grip" on the nail?
Thats probably why I started :laughing:

I just have used a waffle head for framing. When im framing I grab the framer.
 
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Jaws said:
Thats probably why I started :laughing:

I just have used a waffle head for framing. When im framing I grab the framer.
Hart made smooth faced framers for years.

Just saying a smooth face doesn't condemn a hammer to "trim" work.

...but I get your point.
 

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I'v been looking for the same thing all of our handnailing is done on seen finishes cladding, decking etc. Iv been eyeing up the dalluge 21 ounce decking hammer i believe the face is not milled but un polished to give a sandpaper finish for grip.
 

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When I did the school portion of my apprenticeship you pretty much didn't need any of the tools they listed... The teacher said the list is basically there because you should have these tools at that point in your career. It would be beyond ridiculous for them not to accept a proper framing hammer under 22oz I bet they just don't want you showing up with a 16 ounce curved claw finishing hammer...
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Thanks for the responses so far guys, the school I'm going to is just a technical college with a carpentry program its not the union apprenticeship program. As much as I would love to take a look at the stiletto hammers they are a little to expensive right now and would kill my tool budget. The vaughn hammers look really good and I also came a cross a Hart smooth face framer with a steel handle that looks a little more comfortable than the estwing.
 

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those harts are unnecessarily heavy, and avoid steel handled hammers as over time they destroy your wrist and elbow. go with hickory. hart makes smooth faced hickory models with the side nail puller like the steel model.
 

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Thanks for the responses so far guys, the school I'm going to is just a technical college with a carpentry program its not the union apprenticeship program. As much as I would love to take a look at the stiletto hammers they are a little to expensive right now and would kill my tool budget. The vaughn hammers look really good and I also came a cross a Hart smooth face framer with a steel handle that looks a little more comfortable than the estwing.
I have used alot of hammers in the last 20 years and the titanium stilletos /daluges i've had they just can't hang with a vaughn 23 oz cali blue. There is no replacement for displacement.
 

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I love these hammer debates-----a hammer is like a tennis racket or a golf club---

The 'best' is what works well for your arm and swing----buy a good quality one to start and then see how it works for you---what is perfect for one carpenter might not be the best for you----

Back in the old hand nailing days, I used a Vaugn---worked well with my style--now? My hammer is used mostly to move things around and the air nailer drives the nails--
 

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I would go wood handle. The head weight is the same, but the overall hammer weight will be less than steel or fiberglass, so the swing will be more effective for driving a framing nail, and you arm will like it more too.


Smooth face hammers are not meat tenderizers like the milled faces are, so they won't tear the skin off as easily, but they are not flat faced either. The convex smooth surface of the smooth faced hammer will make contact with the nail head in one small area and stick to it as well as any new milled face hammer. The face will not be damaged from using hardened concrete nails like the milled face is. And once a milled face is worn smooth, it works like it was originally smooth anyway. If the hammer is making contact with the nail-head in more than one spot the sticking power is reduced exponentially by the increased striking area of the head face and is more likely to slide off and hit the wrong nail. So the transition time from new to worn smooth is the most dangerous to your fingers with the milled face hammer.


Also, a good technique to learn is to set the nails with a light glancing blow, or a shallow eliptical swat, that moves the hammer head away from the thumb and fingers during/after the strike. I find that holding the nail point off the surface a little helps set the nail also, by giving it a little punch speed before it meets the surface. The added space provides a little more overall escape room for those fond fingers and the smooth face will not grab the nail head sideways on the starter swat.


Keep a rhythm too. Three swings on a framing nail is not bad, two is better, and a light to-the-side tap to keep time while fumbling the next nail into position. The sound of money making framing music, nails a'popping and saws' a singing. :thumbup:


Cuss'n yo hammer, is not part of the song. :no:


Good luck in school!

...
 

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I would get a Daullege 16 oz trim hammer with a wooden handle, I have one and love my. Or try a Vaughan 99 16 oz hammer or a Vaughan 999 20oz smooth face. Both made in USA.
 

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The smooth face rule kills some good hammers but definitely stay away from anything steel handled fiberglass is good but wood is better i would say Vaughan is the best choice , just go down to the local lumberyard or tool store and get a feel for them , whatever you do dont get something cheap because it will cost you in the long run and also the new harts suck they are make from cheap soft chinese steel . my personal choice is a 21 oz dalluge
 

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I used Estwing 28 oz ,steel handled hammers for about 40 years for framing then saw a wood handled Estwing version a couple years ago and love it.The wood handle has a better feel to my hand being thicker and is a lot better on my old joints.Have used a few Vaughan's over the years and liked them too.
Get a quality hammer with a hickory handle.You joints will thank you down the road.
 
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