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I am starting to do some research on some zoombooms here, probably wont be looking to purchase on for another year or so. I was wondering what everyone is using as well as what they like and don't like about their specific model/brand. My very max budget would be $50,000.00 but would likely want to keep it with-in the $30,000.00 or less. Is it worth buying in the states and having it shipped up here or buying used locally?
 

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most of the lifts you see here on kijiji and such will be in the states anyway. The broker just posts up pics, and sells the it remotely.
You do not get to look at the machine personally.

I 'd recommend finding and purchasing a machine in the states rather than using a broker. It's easy to import.

over the last 5 yrs I have purchased 2 machines in the states and imported them myself. My recommendation is to get one that is in the states as close to Alberta as possible. Last one was in Idaho and it cost $2100 shipping. From Chicago area, where many good machines are located it was closer to $4500 for shipping.

For size, I've personally found that a 6k 36' machine does the job. It's not ideal but with a 16' jib, and some foresight it has always done everything I need.

Most guys will recommend a 8k 42' machine with outriggers. I've found the price to be at least $6k more usually closer to $10k

As far as brand, Who knows? I've seen all of the brands. They all lift material :laughing: It seems like JCB has the biggest following here. In Calgary, I don't expect service or parts to be a problem which ever brand.
My current lift is a JCB. It's been good to me so far.

If I ever do it again, I'll personally try to find a Lull with a traversing Carriage. I had one very similar to warrens new one and the extra 6' or carriage travel is very nice at times, (although it has very limited weight capacity when stretched out like that) And IIrc, it does not have the boom chains. It's just one long ram in the boom.

Things to look out for (my experience)

-Try to get one with good tires, it's like $5k for a new set.
-Try to get under 5k hours. Preferably under 2500
-IMO the cummins 3.9 is the best possible engine.
-Newly painted machines can mean trouble
I'd prefer a simple low frills machine rather than a complex one.
(pilot controls, electronic engine , electronic transmission)


I might have a nice JCB 506B for sale by next year. (low to mid $20k):laughing: (I paid $22,900 delivered to my Jobsite.)
 

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Zoom Booms were a Canadian product built by Carelift. We had a big 10,000# unit that we used the crap outa. Very good machine except for the wheels
 

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Millions of questions and answers you'll be asking.
Size and capacity is where you need to pin point. 6k 36' is on the smaller size. Lots of guys have them that size and make it work quiet well. Any machine that lifts material to the roof is better then nothing. Size of jobs and what you want to do with it will factor the size. Obviously price and condition will be the end factor.
I have a 10k 55' with a 12-20' truss boom and I could never goto a smaller machine. I run a larger crew and the machine on days runs full time to feed all the guys material as fast as possible.
I do agree look for new tires. They are an expensive item to replace. If it's possible have a 3rd party look at the machine if you buy it online. Check for leaks and if cylinders are leaking. Repairs can get expensive fast. I'm looking at a 10k+ repair in the near future due to an older machine showing its age.
As far as brands. It's all personal. Jcb, cat, jlg, carelift, terex, skytrack, lull, gradall the list goes on. Stay with any of the big brands and parts and service are doable. Any of the jlg machines or companies they own make parts very easy to get. I own a gradall with rear steer. Takes time to get used to but can be very helpful over 4wheel steer sometimes.
 

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I only have one point about brand that I prefer, and it is a feature on Lulls (maybe a few others?) that allows the carriage to traverse forward and back, meaning you can move a load on a horizontal plane without jockeying up and out as you do on other lifts. My Lulls both have full hydraulic controls, and no electronics. No difficulty troubleshooting issues or gremlins.

You can by a really good lift for under 20k, and I would not be afraid of higher hours if they have been maintained, because many lifts spend a lot of time idling. The expensive repair to most lift is the transmissions....if there is any indication of slip, walk away.....same for popping or noise when you turn them, meaning they could have differential or ball joint problems.
 

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I have a 1997 JCB 508-40 which is a #8000 , 40' vertical lift, with 3600 hrs, I paid $15,000.00. At times, I do wish the machine was bigger, but I've set plenty of trusses with it. I feel as though I got a pretty good deal on the machine, but I missed out on other deals (better deals) because I wasn't prepared. That would be my biggest piece of advice, be ready to buy so when you find someone who is forced to sell, you can steal it
 

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I used a Lull 1044c when I built 25 towns in Toronto.... best machine I have ever seen...outriggers and user friendly. A decent used one will certainly get inside your budget....42'scope, it also has a unique railing system that the boom is mounted on which will track forward 8'. That will allow you to move the material forward and backward on the one horizon. When you have a high lift to make close to the structure (such as a 3 story building) and you need to load or unload, this feature allows you to move the lift forward or backward on a stable platform without the risk of damage. The forks themselves are on a hydraulic swivel which is key for picking things up when your not perfectly level or lined up. When I have 20 posts, I will get some photos up for you to see.
Mr Chips
 

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A 1044 Lull with outriggers would be the ideal machine, plus the rotating forks. If you upset that machine, you would deserve an award. When we have #5000 steel clear spans in the air, the traversing feature is a God send....no reason to jerk the machine by trying to move a few inches. Simply use the traverse and slide it into position.
 

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I have a 2001 jcb 6k 42'. It has been great and I wouldn't go any smaller as far as height. Lifting gables we have maxed out a fair bit. I bought for 15k a few years back. They seem a lot higher priced now that things are back moving. I can't imaging framing without one.
 

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Can any of you guys post pics of platforms you have built for your lifts?

I am getting mine on Wednesday and I hope to build about a 4x12 platform with rails.
 

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We built this one several years ago, I think it 14'.

I'm actually looking at purchasing a couple new ones. If I'm not mistaken, they told me per OSHA they had to be just shy of 10'
 

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For what it's worth. No platforms are technically legal. Unless the manufacture approves of the item it is not legal. Here in Ontario they are strictly frowned upon and face fines upto 5k if I'm not mistaken. From how I understand it the machine has to be operable from the work area.

Now that being said there are lots of places that make them and claim to be legal. I would ask for engineered paperwork either way if I was buying one.

Just my two cents
 

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For what it's worth. No platforms are technically legal. Unless the manufacture approves of the item it is not legal. Here in Ontario they are strictly frowned upon and face fines upto 5k if I'm not mistaken. From how I understand it the machine has to be operable from the work area.

Now that being said there are lots of places that make them and claim to be legal. I would ask for engineered paperwork either way if I was buying one.

Just my two cents
So you wont be posting a pic?
We have a built a few platforms on site. Mostly we would want something for setting windows in high places. I was hoping to engineer something strong that could easily be disassembled and hauled in my van.
 

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I'm not saying I have ever built on site ones. Or know people with nice steel ones. I've priced them out to have then engineered. In hopes the ministry of labour would cut me slack. No luck. For what an engineered platform would cost me. If they changed the laws here or had an easier way to get around the ministry, I'd have one in a heart beat. Check out
http://www.starindustries.com/safety_work_platform.htm
 

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We built one 7 years ago outta 2x8 joists and advantech subfloor, it was 8' in width, 16' in length. We framed sleeves (I guess ya could call em that?), just like the OSHA complaint steel ones for purposes of picking it up with the forks, but it didn't have the pins to properly attach it so it could have technically slide off the forks..it was a straight up ******* setup, not safety compliant, but hell, it did the job for awhile! Oh ya not easy to transport either, since then we have the steel cage style one with the railings etc
 

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Technically a boom lift is not for lifting personnel...but everyone does it. I would bet if OSHA stopped by you would get dinged. Maybe if the guy on the platform was harnessed and tied off you might get a pass. The do sell remote kits that give control of everything except drive controls. They cost about 10 grand and I still am in question wether that would get you off the hook.

Our platform is home built out of steel. We welded everything. It has rails on three sides and is 99" long...that's too small. We are going to get a new one made or build a new one 10' long.
 

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I know some guys who have a 16' platform that was welded and they've had it since 2004 and its going strong. They got the basic design from a buddy in the mid-west where a shop builds them and sells them.

I could probably get the original photos for you if you want.

The 'roof' on this was temporary but worked really well and allowed them to side for a few days w/out getting too wet.
 

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kyle_dmr is right....the Ministry of Health and Safety here in Ontario are handing out fines in the tune of $500,000.00 . One company here locally was slapped with one of those earlier this year when a framer fell off a make shift platform (you need to be tied off above 8'). Anyway...turns out the guy who fell was an illegal from South America and here using his cousins ID (he was pretty banged up but he lived). A real hornets nest and a real problem here in Toronto (illegals I mean). Anyway, the ministry is taking the Contractor to court. There has been a blitz on safety here for about the last 15 yrs. We have to put railings on the 1st floor outside walls before lifting them...yep the entire second floor has to be railed off before you can start your 2nd floor joisting and they must remain there until you begin standing your second floor partitions. It has gone way too far in my opinion (just a cash grab !!).....so the thought of a makeshift platform on a forklift (no matter if it was made of Kryptonite) would end you up with a major fine and possibly jail......no joke !!!
 

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I know some guys who have a 16' platform that was welded and they've had it since 2004 and its going strong. They got the basic design from a buddy in the mid-west where a shop builds them and sells them.

I could probably get the original photos for you if you want.

The 'roof' on this was temporary but worked really well and allowed them to side for a few days w/out getting too wet.
We talked about a removeable roof. I would eventually like to have a nice steel one.
 
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