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How do you clasify yourself as a roofer?

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I am aware this is a very old topic. But I had a question for Pgriz. This may seem silly, but, have you or your guys found shoes that grip on the aluminum shingles? We don't get a lot of requests for Aluminum shingle installation, but, we do get requests to remove swamp coolers, and patch the opening in the roof, install shingles. I think our guys would rather remove ice than walk on those roofs with aluminum shingles on them due to the fact that they are slick slick slick.

Just wondering is you have found a solution. :)
 

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Anita said:
I am aware this is a very old topic. But I had a question for Pgriz. This may seem silly, but, have you or your guys found shoes that grip on the aluminum shingles? We don't get a lot of requests for Aluminum shingle installation, but, we do get requests to remove swamp coolers, and patch the opening in the roof, install shingles. I think our guys would rather remove ice than walk on those roofs with aluminum shingles on them due to the fact that they are slick slick slick.

Just wondering is you have found a solution. :)
The secret is, Anita, to flap the arms very quickly.:cheesygri That and the power of positive thinking.

Seriously, we take all the usual safety precautions (scaffolding, edge guard, roof jacks, roof anchors and full-body fall protection).

The crew have tried out various footwear, and soft rubber sneakers seem to work best. Conventional workboot soles are too stiff and hard. We've also tried broomball shoes and rock climbing boots, but find that the sneakers seem to be best. It's very important that the rubber is clean (no dust, grit, etc. stuck to the bottom), so the guys often take off their normal street shoes off just before going onto the roof, and wear the "roofing" shoes when working. It's also a matter of getting used to the material underfoot. Some basic common sense rules apply: never go on a metal roof (copper, aluminum, steel, etc.) when the surface is damp. The moisture makes the surface super-slick. That works great for you when you want snow and ice off your roof, but bad if you're on it.

If we have to go on an aluminum roof to inspect, we almost always throw a lifeline over to the other side, and anchor it on something solid (you probably heard the old joke about what happens when you tie it to the bumper of a car or truck). In other words, have a very healthy respect for the potential slickness.

That said, one of my guys can walk up an 8/12 in his "roofing shoes" on aluminum shingles without having to pull on his lifeline for support. We call him "The Squirrel". I get wobbly on anything over 5/12, but that's me.:cheesygri
 

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Roofing in FL? Not for this old guy. Did it once as a much younger man and scratched it off of my career avenues.
May still do my own though. It's a 3-12 and 4-12 ranch, basically 6 flat panels. I'm going metal.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
After years of installing metal roofs and seeing a number of accidents, we think OSHA should really address the issue of requiring OSHA approved roofing shoes for installing metal roofs above a certain slope. Just speaking from personal experience we think anything above a 4/12 pitch should require OSHA approved roofing shoes. What do y'all think?
I think you are trying to sell shoes. LOL
 

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I think that guy should be taken out back and pummeled.
Grumps! What the hell are you doing resurrecting a post YOU started over six years ago??? Bored?:eek:
 
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