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Don't Eat Yellow Snow!
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401 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As seen in previous posts i seem to be getting alot of small jobs lately,nice ones but small and this is no exception!
A York stone slate porch on a grade 2 listed building, i didnt do the carpentry work(He made a nice job of it) btw :thumbsup:.
Cheers
Dave
 

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Don't Eat Yellow Snow!
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401 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
What is a grade 2 building?
The building we were working on is over 350 years old and deemed a historical building, to do any building work on these type of buildings need speacial planning permision from English heritage.
Below is a list of the grades;
The buildings are graded to show their relative architectural or historic interest:
• Grade I buildings are of exceptional interest
• Grade II* are particularly important buildings of more than special interest
• Grade II are of special interest, warranting every effort to preserve them
Listing currently protects 500,000 or so buildings, of which the majority - over 90% - are Grade II. Grade I and II* buildings may be eligible for English Heritage grants for urgent major repairs.
Hope this helps
Cheers
Dave
 

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JumboJack for president!
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747 Posts
The building we were working on is over 350 years old and deemed a historical building, to do any building work on these type of buildings need speacial planning permision from English heritage.
Below is a list of the grades;
The buildings are graded to show their relative architectural or historic interest:
• Grade I buildings are of exceptional interest
• Grade II* are particularly important buildings of more than special interest
• Grade II are of special interest, warranting every effort to preserve them
Listing currently protects 500,000 or so buildings, of which the majority - over 90% - are Grade II. Grade I and II* buildings may be eligible for English Heritage grants for urgent major repairs.
Hope this helps
Cheers
Dave
got my house up for sale and im moving to england. HERE I COME BIG BEN!!
 

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Don't Eat Yellow Snow!
Joined
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401 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Did you use lead bibs on those courses that the keyways nearly line up on?
I love those small jobs.
Yes Frank we did, we set it out on the ground first and worked out where everything was going, as there random slate we sized the lenghts first then set it all out with the least cuts possible.
It cant b helped when the bonds come so close so theres lead like you said where its less than a 4" side cover.
Cheers
Dave
 

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copper magnet
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806 Posts
English Roofer -

Very nice work, but I have a question, if you don't mind.

When I counter flash, I use individual "flags" installed so each piece overlaps the one below. If any water enters at the vertical joint between the metal and the masonry, it gets shed back out by the part of the flag covered by the next flag.

With your method (cutting the entire counter flashing from one piece), do you ever have a problem with water entering the vertical joint? I see you cut a back angle at this area, which I assume is to combat this problem. Is the metal caulked to masonry as well?
 

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Don't Eat Yellow Snow!
Joined
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401 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
English Roofer -

Very nice work, but I have a question, if you don't mind.

When I counter flash, I use individual "flags" installed so each piece overlaps the one below. If any water enters at the vertical joint between the metal and the masonry, it gets shed back out by the part of the flag covered by the next flag.

With your method (cutting the entire counter flashing from one piece), do you ever have a problem with water entering the vertical joint? I see you cut a back angle at this area, which I assume is to combat this problem. Is the metal caulked to masonry as well?
Hi See You, we also do individual pieces (called Pigs Ears here)but i tend to do the flashing in one contuinuos lenght for speed and looks, with the flashing cut back at the angle stops water getting in.
Yes we use a flexable caulk called leadmate.
Cheers
Dave
 

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Don't Eat Yellow Snow!
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401 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
very kool Dave,thanks for exposing us to workmanship details that are centuries old:thumbsup:

are those vinyl windows
Hi Tom, im really not sure, ive looked at the photos again and i cant tell, but the house is listed so i would say there timber but i also noticed plastic rainwater pipes so maybe they are plastic!
Cheers
Dave
 

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Don't Eat Yellow Snow!
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401 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Small job or no, I would have loved to build that. Don't think I'll see anything like it in my neighborhood though. Very nice work.

Is that a cat door?

Good Luck
Dave
Hello Dave, yes that is a 'ye olde catus flapious' well spotted! i wish all my jobs were as nice to do as this one!
Cheers
Dave
 
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