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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, so we installed new windows on a home. Homeowner wanted same size windows all around. And the only changes we were to make was the way they opened. She wanted casement windows rather than the old fashioned slide-up she had. So we measure the rough opening, give them to the window manufacturer we deal with. Never have we had a problem with their product.

3 of the old wooden window sills sit ALMOST flush with a pony wall. To measure, I actually had to stick my tape down between the pony wall and the sill to find the bottom of the framing.

New windows arrive. ALL windows fit perfect. The only problem was two of those windows that sat flush with the pony wall, just perfectly fit to make it in height-wise. However, was no way to get in and insulate the bottom of the windows because of the pony wall. I couldn't even do it from the outside because there was no way insulation would even fit and not cause the window to bind. ONE of those windows now sits a little less than flush with the pony wall. Like the sill sits 1/8th of an inch lower than the pony wall.

I took it out and measured compared to the other windows and it's the exact same measurements. I was bang on with rough opening measurements. Homeowner is angry and wants pony wall rebuilt at our cost. Because of the second floor right above the window, there is no room to adjust header. Upon measuring the pony wall, the measurements are 3 different heights around the room. Not by much but enough to make a difference. What would you do? I'm aware that the way new windows are built, there is bound to be a difference. But I've never had a problem like this one. Lol...I've installed a lot of windows that sit above pony walls, but never have seen them framed behind pony walls. So I obviously missed something?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Good question. It's been installed since June of 2012. There was no mention of it at all. In fact, they were paid for already. It's been through 2 winters already and now she said she feels a draft around the bottom of it. Operation is smooth, no problems. It's a long story but we have done extensive work for her. And come time to pay for the final project, she is coming up with some crazy excuses not to pay for this project that isn't related to windows.

She claims she had another "contractor" come in before even mentioning it to us, and he has told her he has to rebuild the pony wall. He told her that if he fixes it from the outside, he will have to replace a whole wall of siding. Not sure where he gets that idea.:rolleyes:

We have our manufacturer coming in a week to inspect the window to make sure it's not a seal or something on their end. Because regardless, it's sealed and the pony wall is insulated. I can't see a draft being able to seep through. But the story now is that it also "looks ugly".

I wish I had pics. Client won't let us into her home to look. And refuses to show pics of anything she is claiming.
 

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If it was installed and she paid for it its hers. If you dont like your meal at the restaurant you dont eat and ask for a refund; you send it back.

Is thid the same customer who was busting your chops about the chimney or a different one?
 

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I'm having a really hard time picturing this. Some pics would be great if possible. On one hand, I'd say that she accepted the job as being complete 2 years ago, so at this point she really can't come back and want something different at your expense. Otoh, if this was really a bad design choice in the first place which is causing some fundamental problem like not being able to seal the sill, you could have some responsibility there being the professional, Ethically if not legally.... Not saying that is the case, but again, some pics would help a ton.
 

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If she paid, its her problem to deal with, unless you warranty your work. I would get this "other contractor" to do another on site walk through with you to see what he is talking about. Iam sure he will not want to do that. If you are saying that the rough opening is so tight you can't get insulation in, there is a good chance the window is installed incorrectly. Casements should be perfectly square, plumb and level to work correctly. I can't imagine on a window that tight, you were able to accomplish that without shimming.
 

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Use a straight edge and a knife or somehow trim 1/4" off the bottom or top of the window to allow room to shim enough to foam around it:
 
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