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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In 1982 we moved to suburban Pittsburgh and bought a well-built 1955 house on a pretty one-acre lot that was nicely treed. With one acre of grass to cut, we bought a Toro walk-behind commercial mower and I proceeded to sketch up and build a garden shed to house it and other stuff.

Ten years later we sold the house to move a day's drive west, to my new job. Last week I was in Pittsburgh visiting relatives, my first time there since leaving long ago, and I drove by the old house.

I was shocked to see it a decrepit abandoned hulk, and this, just a par-five distance from a Whole Foods Market. Who knows why, but the owners or owner never saw fit to do anything at all to maintain the property, except to rip up all the landscaping we had done.

But, the shed. I built it myself, no help, and it was the first piece of building I had ever done, save that of helping build the family house with my dad when in early high school. I used the best stuff available for the exterior. Western red cedar for all. Roof of heavy-butt shakes, skip-sheathed, felt-interleaved. Siding and trim all WRC, the claps clear VG, the trim a pretty good grade. Copper nails, hand driven, for everything, roof, trim, and claps.

Roofing went on bare, but siding and trim were all coated on all sides, edges, and and ends with Cabots something-or-other, pigmented, and I remember doing it twice.

So behold it as I found it, untouched since being done in the late summer of 1983. The wonder of cedar, completely unmaintained.
 

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Nice shed.

Strange, the lawn doesn't look particularly neglected.

Different strokes I guess. Perhaps there's some speculative value that is yet to be realized?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I looked it up in the county GIS, and the data has it that the couple that owned it from 1996 through just six weeks ago, sold it to some LLC that sounds like a house flipper setup. They must have mowed the grass, which a family member reported to me was up at hayfield height all summer. Sale price was about lot value.

The place had been originally built by the owners of a small lumberyard. Cement tile roof that looked like wood shakes, most all the framing on 12" centers, the finest clear maple floors throughout except in tiled baths, and the front foyer was bluestone laid on a concrete bed, the floor joists all dropped to make it work out. All brick exterior with redwood, yes redwood, used for fascia and rake, and an accent wall facing the street.
 
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