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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am curious how others would do this. If your customer needs a beam to stiffen their garage ceiling and doesn't mind if it is going to be visible would you (A) remove an area of sheetrock just big enough for your beam so that it touches the ceiling joists or (B) leave the sheetrock and just snug the beam up to it? Any advantages or disadvantages that anyone cares to comment on?
 

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My first thought would be. Why do they need a beam?? Then what size, and, why wasn't it done from the start? If you don't cut the ceiling/drywall out, improper nailing is the best that you can provide! And who can see REALLY what is needed through drywall? There MUST be a reason, that needs to be addressed! Just my 2 cents!!!
 

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C. go through access hole or remove drywall, look and find problem. fix problem, put back drywall.. and your gonna say they just want a cheap fix, I only do the right fix..js,,
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Beam is specd by an engineer, support in the middle by steel post, beam pocket in opposing walls, cost isn't a concern. The question was remove sheetrock or not?
 

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This is sometimes done to give some storage space when the framing wouldn't be rated for storage.

Non-structural beams can go below the sheetrock, structural ones always are tight to the framing. Drywall will crush, and the nailed connections are much weaker with a mushy spacer in between.
 

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Other worthy comments considered: If you want perfect, rip the d*mned roof off and start over.

If you want to improve the situation, then yeah...

Done it, and more than once on these old 2x4 joisted garages we like so much around here.

Leave the drywall, lay 2x4 on the flat on either side to keep your beam from racking - done.

This ain't no piano we're building Spanky...

Drywall ain't gonna crush - even if that 5/8" drywall crushes completely (ASSuming they even used it), the end result over the long run is still going to be much better than the 4-5" belly these old dogs have around here.

Somebody said "engineer"? We doan need no steenkin' engineer!
 

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Before you start packing anything, I'd be more concerned about structural integrity of the ceiling which will be loaded with additional storage loads and make sure the beam you going to stick there is the right size.

Hopefully, the framing was done correctly and ceiling joist were sized properly to begin with, but without knowing the width or depth of the garage, it is impossible to make a suggestion... With that said, if you not sure or don't know how make a load calculation, it will be worth to consult with an architect or engineer, especially if you know they will be using for storage and you don't know how much s^*t they will be keeping up there.
 

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Remove the sheetrock, it's a 45 minute job.
Yup, it is that fast. I like your setup - amazing what we can accomplish working solo, eh?

Welp, here's the deal on NOT cutting.

Code man asks me "Why you want to so a half-assed repair? A beam is never going to be as effective as larger joists."

I say, because the homeowner - you know - doesn't want to spend the money to pull down the lid, put up properly sized joists and re-drywalling and painting and all that STUFF. Besides, its not falling down - just sagging a bit.

Code man says to me that when i build a garage - for fire protection - I got to put 5/8" dw on the lid and the wall shared with dwelling, and 1/2" on other walls.

Code mans says if I cut the lid to push that beam up tight to joists, I now have to cover that beam with 5/8" rock - to maintain fire code.

Home owners says "you want to charge me HOW MUCH! for dw-ing a lousy beam?!!!"

Engineer man tells me there is no benefit to lagging beam to joists - especially since any fastener capable of being effective in that regard, would also likely split the bottom face of the joist.

Better, he says, is to to lay 2x4 on the flat on either side of the beam to keep it from racking, and in that way, itty-bitty #8 screws can hold the 2x4s to the joists.

So the beam gets laid on the dw, left exposed, and everybody is happy - because it's a garage....not a piano.

Our job is to make it better - not to make it ready for NASA.

I don't know why other people put beams up in already built garages: I have only done it to help correct sagging joists - either from being undersized to start with, or overloaded from people storing crap up there. And then of course, there's the crawling up in the space and putting cribs in to help straighten the bellied rafters.
 
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