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it's a saw. it goes round and cuts. just a matter of adjusting to the weight difference and how the 2 saws are balanced differently.
 

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Is their any learning curve with a worm drive saw? Have always used a sidewinder. Thanks
It'll feel stupid heavy at first. I think you "get used" to it more than get stronger to make up for it... The slower blade feels a bit weird going through light lumber i.e 2x4 SPF. I'd say there's a bit of a learning curve but its the same concept as a sidewinder.

Coming from a guy who switched to a worm drive last month
 

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I bought a worm drive last year for the first time. I picked up a well used 8 1/4 skill for 50 bucks at the pawn shop. It has quickly become my go to saw. The line of sight is great for me, and as a short person, having the extra reach for cutting 4x8 sheets is a nice bonus.
 

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What blade you use makes a difference - some are designed for worm drives and some are designed for sidewinders.
 

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Grand Rapids Remodeling
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;)
my cuts come out way more accurate/straighter when I watch the blade.

I can cut a line as nice as a table saw and only look at the blade once as it enters the sheet, and that's with a scribed line, by tape measure too. After the kerf is started, I move my attention to the guide, and keep a steady strong feed, so I cut much quicker than a TS too.


I always feel like techniques need to be talked about when comparing the two types of saws. I own both kind, but have more time on side-winders. I started appreciating the Worms more when I started gang cutting rafters/ bird-mouths. With wormies, I tend to be a blade watcher, but I keep aware of the guide (and my other senses too), but w/sw's, I religiously use the guide and my body's senses of sight, hearing, and touch, for sheathing cuts.


Wd's can cut better with dull blades than sw's. I have had some old Craftsman saws that the blade was totally hidden by the housing. I use mostly PC-315-1 mod saws. Drop foot w/top handles. Since they discontinued them about twenty years back, I just keep rebuilding them.


I think once you get a few hundred thousand cuts under your belt, it just happens, either type of saw.


One other thing I do is pull the trigger and never let off. It makes the switches last longer. Brush are cheaper and easier to replace too.


Using a Circ saw is more than just a visual experience. Your other senses are your warning lights on your instrument panel. If it looks, sounds, and feels good, all lights are green.



Keep that baby buzzing! ;)

...
 

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stacker of sticks
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Birch said:
;) I can cut a line as nice as a table saw and only look at the blade once as it enters the sheet, and that's with a scribed line, by tape measure too. After the kerf is started, I move my attention to the guide, and keep a steady strong feed, so I cut much quicker than a TS too. I always feel like techniques need to be talked about when comparing the two types of saws. I own both kind, but have more time on side-winders. I started appreciating the Worms more when I started gang cutting rafters/ bird-mouths. With wormies, I tend to be a blade watcher, but I keep aware of the guide (and my other senses too), but w/sw's, I religiously use the guide and my body's senses of sight, hearing, and touch, for sheathing cuts. Wd's can cut better with dull blades than sw's. I have had some old Craftsman saws that the blade was totally hidden by the housing. I use mostly PC-315-1 mod saws. Drop foot w/top handles. Since they discontinued them about twenty years back, I just keep rebuilding them. I think once you get a few hundred thousand cuts under your belt, it just happens, either type of saw. One other thing I do is pull the trigger and never let off. It makes the switches last longer. Brush are cheaper and easier to replace too. Using a Circ saw is more than just a visual experience. Your other senses are your warning lights on your instrument panel. If it looks, sounds, and feels good, all lights are green. Keep that baby buzzing! ;) ...
I can cut I straighter line without looking at it at all, having a conversation with someone
 

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I do a surprising number of curved cuts, so I have to go with watching the blade on these. For gradual curves, I'll use a regular blade in the circ saw, but for tighter radius curves I'll use a demo blade - it's so thin it will flex pretty easily.
 

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wormdrives are a more versatile tools. Either left or right handed. I for one use a wormdrive with both hands. I am right hand dominant and cut with my right hand 90% of the time. if I am cutting rafter cheek cuts ill switch to left hand.
 
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