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For those in cold weather climates;

Handling the tools, nails, screws, etc gets to be pretty difficult when the mercury drops up here.

Is there a temperature threshold you use to decide weather your crews will work outside? (my guys are doing windows and doors outside)

Below 20 degrees?

Below 10? etc?

Also, any suggestions for the warmest work gloves available?

Also, Happy New Year to all.

I've been away from the board for awhile because I've been busy with work and my new son. I hope to get back around more in the coming months.
 

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Kind of depends on what you are working on , forecast, how desperate I am to get something done. 0 aint bad if the sun is shining and there is no wind.
I hate to be out there if all you are doing is getting your guys some time in,but you are not really getting anything accomplished
 

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framer
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I let the guys go home (no pay) at 0* wind chill counts.
The best system I have found is layers upon layers.
Fleece lined jeans beat thermals
T shirt,thermal shirt, another T, then a good sweat shirt or 2 with some sort of wind breaker over everything.
I only were the cheep white knit, glove liners unless I'm on a machine all day then some sort of ski type gloves.
I think the worst thing you can do is "get warmed up" in your truck or heated shed at lunch or breaks, I just stay in the ***** all day and like a bear you get used to it.
 

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hurtlocker
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rule of thumb for me
high of zero
there are exceptions to this either way depending on wind and sun
gloves i like hunting gloves
I buy them this time of year you can get a 20 30 dollar pair of gloves for 5 to 10 dollars
buy the ones that are not real thick, and not tight
they break in about a day or two
i buy three pair lasts me all year
 

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Here in Canada, the labour laws say -20 farenhiet. Colder than that you cannot be forced to work.

Personaly, I have worked in -40 with wind chill, but won't do that anymore. If the guys are freezing, leave it for another day.
 

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I go by the calendar, not the temperature. No work accepted between Dec. 1 (my call) and end of March or mid April (usually the GC's call) I earn enough in the season to sit winter out.



Mark
 

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Depends what I am working on. In the winter months I will not do a roof unless it is something that needs immediate attention. I usually cut off when the high of the day wont reach 20. Too many things seem to act up and everything is so much harder to work with when its that cold that I find I spend more time wasted than anything.
 

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we have a guideline of -20c for shutting down, although last wednesday i found myself working at -28 with wind and snow.

I find the best winter clothing is canvas clothing. i've had my insulated coveralls caked with ice and stiff as a board but they stay just as warm. proper winter steel (or composite) toed boots help, and it helps to bring an extra pair of gloves to keep in your warm layers so you can swap gloves when your hands get cold. you can also get disposable hand and toe warmer packs for extra cold days, though these can get expensive.

last winter i had the misfortune of fighting with 10x20 tarps 30 feet up in wind and snow at -46. i pray i'll never experience that again.

I stumbled upon 10 pairs of unused fleece lined work gloves from a garage sale for a dollar each, quite a bargain when i pay 15 for an identical pair brand new, there are bargains out there guys just keep an eye out!
 

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Project Superintendent
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we have a guideline of -20c for shutting down, although last wednesday i found myself working at -28 with wind and snow.

I find the best winter clothing is canvas clothing. i've had my insulated coveralls caked with ice and stiff as a board but they stay just as warm. proper winter steel (or composite) toed boots help, and it helps to bring an extra pair of gloves to keep in your warm layers so you can swap gloves when your hands get cold. you can also get disposable hand and toe warmer packs for extra cold days, though these can get expensive.

last winter i had the misfortune of fighting with 10x20 tarps 30 feet up in wind and snow at -46. i pray i'll never experience that again.
Good lord! I am pushing my roofing crew real hard and had them come in on Saturday today. It was +16 and sunny, but wind out of the North 15 to 20. Miserable, but they got their 8 hours in. If it got to 46 below here everything would shut down, not just construction!
 

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Yeah I don't think so. I haven't been hungry enough to want to work in weather under 40 degrees.
 

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I saw some guys (framers) putting on the first floor deck of a home to enclose it and heat for from freezing below so the others (plumbers) could put in some under-slab plumbing and have something to hang a furnace to when the propane ran out on Monday morning.

It was -16F this morning with a high of almost zero and too cold to get out and bother them about what they were wearing. I saw a truck and the sign said they from an area that had -30F (-50 windchill) this morning, so I guess they just came south where it was warmer to work. - You do what you have to do.
 

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-46 thats funny. Why would anybody do that? 10 degrees is when we consider not working. Some of the worst days are just when its wet and slightly cold like 25 degrees and windy. Years ago I worked in wind chills of 40 below. Thats when I worked for somebody else. I can't make any money off of the guys when it gets like that. So why bother?

Have you guys tried the underarmor gear? I have one pair and love em but am reluctant to spend 50 bucks on another. If they make it through another winter I will consider it.
 

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Funny that I just read this post as I'm trying to warm up after siding a colonial today. Was a high of about +15 degrees here today, with the wind I'm sure it was close to 0.

I wear layers and layers. Try to stay away from wearing a coat because it makes it hard to move around. 2-3 Sweatshirts with a couple long sleeve shirts underneath do the trick usually.

Thermal underwear or insulated bibs for pants.

As far as gloves, just keep your hands dry. I have some Gorgonz insulated gloves but I lose a lot of dexterity with them on. Maybe bring a few pairs of gloves to change during the day and keep them dry.
 

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-46 thats funny. Why would anybody do that? 10 degrees is when we consider not working. Some of the worst days are just when its wet and slightly cold like 25 degrees and windy. Years ago I worked in wind chills of 40 below. Thats when I worked for somebody else. I can't make any money off of the guys when it gets like that. So why bother?

Have you guys tried the underarmor gear? I have one pair and love em but am reluctant to spend 50 bucks on another. If they make it through another winter I will consider it.
Underarmor is great for the cold! That's why it was created! :clap:
 

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when i worked in -46 it was an absolute necessity. we poured the second story of an ICF office building and the wind was so strong it ripped off some of the insulated tarps we used to trap the heat on the top. funny thing is we poured on a mild Saturday (-8c). Often when i work in cold weather conditions it's due to emergency or a rapid schedule, it's rarely not important.
 
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