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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am remodeling a home damaged by a recent flood. The entire house has been stripped to the studs and mold remediated.

The rear exterior wall of the house is nuts. Another contractor started reframing and has done some silly stuff, which should be clear in the photo (note the random furred out 1x and 2x on the beam). The room appears to have originally been some sort of sun room. The rear exterior wall is made up of a series of 4x4 treated posts supporting a double 2x10 beam. Studs have been framed in between the posts, running all the way down to the sill plate, and up to a series of top plates fastened to the bottom of the beam, between the posts.
Here's (some of) the trouble- all of the studs are out of plane with each other and out of plane with the beam resting on the 4x4s, with a variance of anywhere from 1" to 2", and none of the studs are 16" on center. They are also all fastened to the exterior sheathing from the outside, under the vinyl siding. To make matters worse, the wall is intended to be a kitchen wall- the entire length of it (about 120") will have wall and base cabinets.

Never mind the existing rough electric and cabinet blocking... I know that will need to be redone.

My question is this: can I frame up a new wall, 2x3 or 2x4, in front of the existing exterior wall? The stud bays won't match up, and the new cavity (from drywall to sheathing) will be deeper than a 2x6 wall. Does this violate fire code? Is there an easier solution?

I just want a straight wall for my drywall and cabinets.

Any advice will help.
 

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Don't know where you are located so fire code question is for your local building inspector.

Framing a straight,plumb wall in front of existing is a great solution. I'd do that.
 

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I think you need to talk with your local inspector. Just use 10' or 12' drywall laid sideways if you want to line up the studs. You might have to drywall over the existing and put a 2" x 4" wall in front of that.
 

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Install plumb studs in the corners, pull string stud to stud, top, middle, bottom, sister in new studs kissing the string. Place the studs in the bays prior to setting the string, notch studs around obstructions, they will get nailed to the existing.

Tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Why the question about if it will violate fire code?

Is this a town home or condo?

Is the existing wall in the set-back or something?

Andy.
It is a two-story, single-family detached house.

I asked about fire code because I'm not terribly familiar with it in this particular case. I feel pretty confident about what to expect from a framing inspection, but in this case I'm not sure. Usually I fur out problem walls because space is an issue (3 1/2" in this case), particularly in a kitchen. I haven't ever consider framing a new wall altogether to conceal an old one, and haven't found info anywhere on the web about it.

I'm not sure what you mean by set-back... like from the street?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Install plumb studs in the corners, pull string stud to stud, top, middle, bottom, sister in new studs kissing the string. Place the studs in the bays prior to setting the string, notch studs around obstructions, they will get nailed to the existing.

Tom
I considered this but was hesitant due to the following: 1) Each new stud would be notched out for the remaining 9 inches or so to account for the beam. 2)What would I use as a top and bottom plate, if anything, to account for the different dimensions of each new stud? 3) If I fasten the new studs to the existing studs, they will still not be 16 on center.

I'm trying to weigh the costs/benefits of each, particularly in terms of man-hours.
 

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Tom's method saves space. The wall may also be more even at "tie ins" to existing walls. Also, you can add studs to make your 16 on centers.
Depending on how out of plumb studs and beam are, your "new wall method" may save a lot of time in framing. It might add in electrical or plumbing time,though.
 

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I considered this but was hesitant due to the following: 1) Each new stud would be notched out for the remaining 9 inches or so to account for the beam. 2)What would I use as a top and bottom plate, if anything, to account for the different dimensions of each new stud? 3) If I fasten the new studs to the existing studs, they will still not be 16 on center.

I'm trying to weigh the costs/benefits of each, particularly in terms of man-hours.

1) Can you end the stud at the beam, the beam then becomes the "top plate". Hopefully the existing beam is straight-See #2.

2) See #1, if that won't work pad the beam with plywood, and drywall shims. Bottom plate can be any infill. You don't need a bottom plate where the lower/full height cabinets will go, only areas where base will be installed.

3) Who care if it is 16" on center? This is not a load bearing wall. I have not broke a sheet of drywall on a framing member in years. You're installing cabinet blocking. Stud layout means nothing and does not matter.

Tom
 
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