Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
530 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wondering how many of guys do winter work in a climate like upstate NY?

I have been asked to look at some projects that I have turned down because I don't think we are geared up for this. Ground heaters, blankets, equipment problems, short days, miserable working conditions etc.

The spec book for the last one I looked at it says that you can not work with frozen material. We have at least 90 days of below 20 temps here so whats you thoughts.

I was thinking at least 30% up charge but I decided to not give a price.

Again wondering if any has gone down this road?
 

·
Vagitarian
Joined
·
3,589 Posts
A few of my buddies are working on the gas wells and pipeline here in PA. The gas companies finally figured out that they cannot make any money here in the winter. My one buddy told me that last year it was -15 below 0 and by 1:30 PM the only thing they got running was an old Cat 235. From what I have been hearing, guys at the gas wells figure around 40% more for winter work.

Is there a deadline to meet ?? This could be the deal breaker.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
219 Posts
I have more work lined up this winter than I have ever before. I just started a 4 unit apartment complex that needs 5500 tons of engineered fill brought in, another ongoing project that needs 1000 tons of fill, and a hauling job for a power line crew that will be drilling in January. All things that would be better to do in the regular season, but can be done in winter. I am definitely not looking forward to getting equipment started and frozen material etc., but cash flow through winter should be good.

I guess I'll find out in the next few months.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
530 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Backhoe,

I am very interested in how this works out for you. A few questions:

Are you responsible for snow removal of the site? Do you receive snow everyday?

How large of an area do you need thawed out?

Are you responsible to use ground heaters and blankets so the in place material doesn't freeze?

Does the imported material need to be trucked in heated box trucks.

Is the spec book specific about placing, testing, importing, compacting frozen material?

Do you have a specific schedule you have to follow or be penalized?

Finally what are you planning on a % of up-charge?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
219 Posts
Answers to your questions:

1. Not responsible for snow removal, may haveto push some out of our way for access, but shouldn't be terrible.

2. Should have excavating done before ground freezes very deep, just be backfilling to do in winter.

3. Once I've got it packed, it's someone else's problem.

4.I don't have heated boxes, some will freeze to the box

5. The imported material is basically sand, it will freeze on the outside but should crumble once you get into it.

6. I don't have a schedule per say, they'll want it done in a timely manner though.

7. The one job was bid in August I think, should be a lot farther along, wasn't planning to do it in winter. The second job I added about 10% to the part we would have to do in winter. I know that's not enough but I thought it would be better than sitting at home and provides for some work right away in the spring.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
555 Posts
Winter is tough, if we can break even during the couple months of bad weather we call it a win. Not really breaking even though with all the maint. We try to get every piece in the shop through the winter months to pm everything. Works out pretty good cause we try to stay balls to the wall during the good weather. We do a lot of paving work though, if the plants stay open and customers want it done now we try our best.

I don't add anything to our bids though, most stuff is bid then we find out who is doing the work weeks or months later. If we run into extra work due to weather we try to work something out with the customer. Ours are pretty good to work with if they need it done we will do what it takes, but the extra as usually t&m. Unless it is bitter cold for long stretches we usually don't get super heavy freeze. Concrete and asphalt get pretty dicey though and can be pita.

On another note we do tend to collect our money pretty well and have cash on hand in the winter until we do all the repairs and Uncle Sam comes calling anyway! We also lay some guys off to try to keep payroll under control as much as possible.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top