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We are in the excavation trade and being kinda pushed into doing the small time concrete work like sidewalks and curb and cutter from the GC's. We done tried subing it out and have had mixed results. We would like to bring it in house, since we do have basic concrete working experience. My question is how does a guy suppost to afford all the forms necessary to do all the different styles. It seems it would be a standard type and thats it. But every engineer that draws the plans likes something a little different. Is there such a thing as forms that you can change to different styles?
 

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How many different types and what types are used in your area?

How much C & G are you doing, just driveway approaches, etc. Or a few hundred feet?

Are you talking about C & G in the public rightaway or private? Remember some roads in residential developments are private and they can use whatever type of C & G they want. Generally C & G standards in the public rightaway/roads are dictated by the city/county/state, as mentioned before.

Years ago we used to do C & G and walk in the city for residential lots we were building on. Generally it was just a rip out of the exisiting straight curb for a driveway approach. So we just framed this out of wood since it was usually only about 30 feet wide with the radius.

Generally around here we only have 3 types of C & G, straight, roll/S curb, and a driveway approach. I use 2 different curbing guys, one uses a machine, and the other does it by hand with forms. The form guy uses just one basic set of forms and wood. He uses the forms for straight curb and driveway approaches that are straight. For the driveway approach on the straight he just pulls out the section in the midde that is used for the straight curb upper face. And then uses wood for the center form as needed to center the approach since the sections never line up right where you want them. The radius is done by hand. He also uses part of hs straight curb forms for roll curb, basically as steel forms for the outside and uses plywood screeds cut out to the shape of the roll/S curb to shape the top. All curves and cul-de-sac's are formed with wood.
 
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