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Just curious as to how many of you are back rolling your walls and ceilings when spraying and why. I usually don't but am curious as to what the benefits are. Ive also noticed when spraying ceilings in a room with a lot of sunlight i often get small lines that remain after everything has dried. Oh and lastly if i do back roll what roller would u recommended?

Thanks Guys
 

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I would assume those small lines are from incorrect pressure. Try turning pressure up a bit to eliminate tails.

How do you touch up if you don't back roll?
" Master Painter" hahahaha
 

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I'm curious about this. Lowes had some people painting the stucco on their buildings here. They were spraying and back rolling but why the need to do this on stucco where you couldn't tell if its been done with a sprayer or roller either way. Does it give the paint a better bond or just level out the spray?
 

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BCConstruction said:
I'm curious about this. Lowes had some people painting the stucco on their buildings here. They were spraying and back rolling but why the need to do this on stucco where you couldn't tell if its been done with a sprayer or roller either way. Does it give the paint a better bond or just level out the spray?
I'm not an expert but regarding exterior, if you don't back brush or roll, the paint does not adhere as well and fails prematurely. I have a friend who is a painter and the sprayed a house and back brushed 3 sides and not the 4th. This was SW duration which I think is about a 10 year paint. After 4 years the sprayed side was failing and at 7 years the other sides were still good.

Again, no expert, just makes sense that it might help with adhesion.

As far as interior on walls you can't touch it up without the roller texture plus it helps even everything out.
 

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Hair Splitter
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Backrolling the first coat of primer ensures that it saturates and just doesn't sit on the surface.

As for rough textures I believe that it works the paint into the low areas.
 

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So what they were doing with 3 guys they could have just done with 1 lol. They had a guy on the sprayer unit and 2 guys in a lift and one was spraying and one using the roller. Wouldn't it be more cost effective and as quick just to put the paint on with the roller and be done with the other 2 guys!
 

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With synthetic stucco especially the back rolling works it into the spots that the sprayer didn't get it into. You can actually see the old color from certain angles if you don't back roll.

For interiors there are many reasons: so you can touch up, so you can spray it heavier and even it out without drips, so it looks better.
 

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So what they were doing with 3 guys they could have just done with 1 lol. They had a guy on the sprayer unit and 2 guys in a lift and one was spraying and one using the roller. Wouldn't it be more cost effective and as quick just to put the paint on with the roller and be done with the other 2 guys!
Rolling requires too many steps back and forth to the paint. With a sprayer you can coat a much larger area much faster and the guy that is backrolling never has to take the roller off the wall. It's actually much faster. Don't know why they had the 3rd guy though.
 

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Back rolling for stucco is a must. There is a huge difference. Especially when it is a rougher texture.

A sprayer can put more paint on the wall faster than just rolling. When we spray, say a skip trowel, we spray enough on the wall to where it is almost running off. In a 3' by 8' space when doing this the roller will run out of paint if you don't continue spraying at this pace.

Back rolling fills in all the voids. I will use a 1 1/4" Lamb skin to paint stucco.
 
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The stripe you see is from improper mil thickness. When you spray you are supposed to overlap each pass 50%. Well, we are humans not robots. So the overlap will never be perfect. The stripe is the thin spot.

You can try remedying this stripe with a cross hatch spray pattern. First pass horizontal, second pass vertical. But sometimes even that is a crapshoot.

So it is best to backroll any area that requires more than one "row" to simply avoid the headache altogether.

TNT is right, no more dipping in the bucket saves tremendous amounts of time. Even doing it solo is faster than stopping several times for a refill in each room.

Rolling is fast, but imagine how much faster it is if you didn't have to stop. Ever.

For alot of people its hard to grasp, & seems counter productive. Until you do it. Then you say "why haven't I been doing this the whole time?!"
 

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Rolling requires too many steps back and forth to the paint. With a sprayer you can coat a much larger area much faster and the guy that is backrolling never has to take the roller off the wall. It's actually much faster. Don't know why they had the 3rd guy though.
Who steps back and forth to the paint?
 

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hdavis said:
Who steps back and forth to the paint?
Does your pan follow you?
We had a new guy who would roll an entire room and never move the pan. We explained some things to him. :)

I will usually leave it till I get where I am taking more than 2 or 3 steps to the pan. I don't want to bend down and move it every time I would have to take a step to get there.
 

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Who steps back and forth to the paint?
Steps as in process, not just physical steps. You have to go back abd forth to the paint to many times just rolling. You can get maybe three vertical 8' rows on each load. With spraying the roller never really leaves the surface.
 

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Does your pan follow you?
We had a new guy who would roll an entire room and never move the pan. We explained some things to him. :)

I will usually leave it till I get where I am taking more than 2 or 3 steps to the pan. I don't want to bend down and move it every time I would have to take a step to get there.
0 Steps, just scoot it along with my foot or the roller.
 

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Steps as in process, not just physical steps. You have to go back abd forth to the paint to many times just rolling. You can get maybe three vertical 8' rows on each load. With spraying the roller never really leaves the surface.
I agree with this - just loading a roller correctly can take almost as much time as rolling the wall. The other thing is getting a roller ready to put paint on a wall takes a little time - prewet, spin out, load and soak, reload. I can be doing other things while the roller is soaking, but it makes a difference in start to finish time on a one room repaint.
 

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hdavis said:
0 Steps, just scoot it along with my foot or the roller.
Half the time I try that I mess up my tarp or something else would happen. I don't mind bend down and picking it up a few times per room.
Maybe I'll try it again.
 

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So what they were doing with 3 guys they could have just done with 1 lol. They had a guy on the sprayer unit and 2 guys in a lift and one was spraying and one using the roller. Wouldn't it be more cost effective and as quick just to put the paint on with the roller and be done with the other 2 guys!
Have you ever used a roller?

Dip, blot, squeeze out excess, lift to wall, too much paint....perfect....too little paint.

And there is no tray to accidentally step on.
 

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hdavis said:
0 Steps, just scoot it along with my foot or the roller.
Ditto. I keep a small piece of plastic under the pan to catch any drips, and grab the pan and slid it closer with the end of my roller

Unless the floor is tile or something with lipped edges. Then I pull the plastic to move the tray so I don't spill.
 
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