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WICKED WOODCHUCKER
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A little about me, Im a gc that does a little of everything, framing, drywall, painting, trim, etc.

When I do large jobs I hire experts to do there thing

yesterday I had the painters in. They were hired to paint 3 rooms, a bedroom, bathroom and huge walk in closet/dressing room. I was also paiting across the hall from them in a small 12x12 bedroom.

They were making fun of how slow I was. And my technique. I was cutting in and rolling one wall at a time then move on to the next wall. I like to roll into a wet corner. Not sure if this is right or wrong but its how I do it. It took me about an hour and a half to complete the room, which I didnt think was to bad. Had a lot of cutting in, 2 windows, 2 doors, the crown, and the base board.

So we all had a good laugh at my painting skills. had lunch and they took off. Went into there room and I could see the difference in the corners and walls, also there were holidays and roller lines. Went into mine and it looked great.

So I called them back up and within an hour they were back fixing it. I laughed and laughed and laughed. When they were finally done I asked for a job application!! LOL

So my question to you expert full time painters is whats your cutting, rolling technique? Do you cut all of it and then roll? whats the best method and why?

Just curious because even though I was a lot slower then the painters mine came out alot better
 

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A little about me, Im a gc that does a little of everything, framing, drywall, painting, trim, etc.

When I do large jobs I hire experts to do there thing

yesterday I had the painters in. They were hired to paint 3 rooms, a bedroom, bathroom and huge walk in closet/dressing room. I was also paiting across the hall from them in a small 12x12 bedroom.

They were making fun of how slow I was. And my technique. I was cutting in and rolling one wall at a time then move on to the next wall. I like to roll into a wet corner. Not sure if this is right or wrong but its how I do it. It took me about an hour and a half to complete the room, which I didnt think was to bad. Had a lot of cutting in, 2 windows, 2 doors, the crown, and the base board.

So we all had a good laugh at my painting skills. had lunch and they took off. Went into there room and I could see the difference in the corners and walls, also there were holidays and roller lines. Went into mine and it looked great.

So I called them back up and within an hour they were back fixing it. I laughed and laughed and laughed. When they were finally done I asked for a job application!! LOL

So my question to you expert full time painters is whats your cutting, rolling technique? Do you cut all of it and then roll? whats the best method and why?

Just curious because even though I was a lot slower then the painters mine came out alot better
Even though there are a lot of painters out there that insist that the newer latexes don't flash, I still work to keep a wet edge and cut just ahead of rolling. I feel that this is especially important for the final coat; I don't worry about it for primer or the first coat of multiple-coat work.

I think you've stumbled upon the approach that a whole lot of painters seem to be taking these days: pushing the envelope to see what they can get away with. They'll do a quick and dirty job and if they get away with it, they've made great wages. If they get "busted" as happened with your guys, they'll come back and do another coat. Most of the time, the clients don't care or don't know the difference.

Years ago, I had a mentor in a previous line of work who had a motto:

"If you don't have time to do it right, when are you going to have time to do it over?"

That's an approach that's stuck with me.
 

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Fortune and glory, kid.
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Even though there are a lot of painters out there that insist that the newer latexes don't flash, I still work to keep a wet edge and cut just ahead of rolling. I feel that this is especially important for the final coat; I don't worry about it for primer or the first coat of multiple-coat work.

I think you've stumbled upon the approach that a whole lot of painters seem to be taking these days: pushing the envelope to see what they can get away with. They'll do a quick and dirty job and if they get away with it, they've made great wages. If they get "busted" as happened with your guys, they'll come back and do another coat. Most of the time, the clients don't care or don't know the difference.

Years ago, I had a mentor in a previous line of work who had a motto:

"If you don't have time to do it right, when are you going to have time to do it over?"

That's an approach that's stuck with me.
With your permission, on behalf of your Mentor I would like to use that line.
 

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Gough,
I still work to keep a wet edge and cut just ahead of rolling. I feel that this is especially important for the final coat; I don't worry about it for primer or the first coat of multiple-coat
Same here.
 

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The Duke
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A little about me, Im a gc that does a little of everything, framing, drywall, painting, trim, etc.

When I do large jobs I hire experts to do there thing

yesterday I had the painters in. They were hired to paint 3 rooms, a bedroom, bathroom and huge walk in closet/dressing room. I was also paiting across the hall from them in a small 12x12 bedroom.

They were making fun of how slow I was. And my technique. I was cutting in and rolling one wall at a time then move on to the next wall. I like to roll into a wet corner. Not sure if this is right or wrong but its how I do it. It took me about an hour and a half to complete the room, which I didnt think was to bad. Had a lot of cutting in, 2 windows, 2 doors, the crown, and the base board.

So we all had a good laugh at my painting skills. had lunch and they took off. Went into there room and I could see the difference in the corners and walls, also there were holidays and roller lines. Went into mine and it looked great.

So I called them back up and within an hour they were back fixing it. I laughed and laughed and laughed. When they were finally done I asked for a job application!! LOL

So my question to you expert full time painters is whats your cutting, rolling technique? Do you cut all of it and then roll? whats the best method and why?

Just curious because even though I was a lot slower then the painters mine came out alot better

It all depends on what colors and finish I'm using. For lighter colors in flat/matte, I cut the whole room or house out then go back and roll into it,darker colors I'll go wall -wall. Now with a eggshell/semi gloss on finish coat I'll go wall -wall with a 9" roller rolling as tight to the corners and across the ceiling line to hide as much as the cut edge as possible. On really dark colors like burgundy, I'll use the Aura Matte,go wall-wall and I've never had it picture frame on me.
 

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... It took me about an hour and a half to complete the room, which I didnt think was to bad. Had a lot of cutting in, 2 windows, 2 doors, the crown, and the base board.
An hour and a half to complete a room is awesome. I've done a lot of painting and there's no way I could do it that fast. It would probably take me about twice that. Of course, I don't know how good your cut lines are, but I'm pretty fussy.

As far as technique, I cut in everything and then roll everything. As long as I feather the paint a little where I cut in, I don't find it necessary to keep a wet edge unless I'm using Aura or a high gloss sheen (rare).
 

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If I am going to put on a coat of paint and don't keep a wet edge, I think it is a coat with mittens, scarf, hat and boots. That is not only a great quote but true. Something we have all lived and learned at some point or another.

I use this one an just about every client. Any money spent on what you don't want- is to much money.
 

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native floridian
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With flat finishes i will roll first then cut in, With any finish that has a sheen keeping a wet edge by cutting first and rolling right behind works best for me
 
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