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For the past 10 years, I've been pulling my trailers with F250's. Have yet to hook onto anything I can't pull. (within common sense) Currently pulling a 7x14 cargo with superduty diesel. I'd like to trade trucks & am thinking about downgrading to an F150. I have zero experience with half tons. How disappointed am I going to be with the downgrade?

I'm gonna sell my 18' trailer, which is the biggest thing I pull & buy a second 14'. Any experience on the subject would sure be appreciated.
 

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As long as you use a little common sense an F-150 will serve you well. I used an extended cab as my work truck for 10 years and it never let me down.
I never tried to pull an 18 ft tool trailer with it, that would be a load, but I've got a 14 ft flatbed that I use to haul material (plywood, blocks, lumber) and it does the job.:thumbsup:
 

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For the past 10 years, I've been pulling my trailers with F250's. Have yet to hook onto anything I can't pull. (within common sense) Currently pulling a 7x14 cargo with superduty diesel. I'd like to trade trucks & am thinking about downgrading to an F150. I have zero experience with half tons. How disappointed am I going to be with the downgrade?

I'm gonna sell my 18' trailer, which is the biggest thing I pull & buy a second 14'. Any experience on the subject would sure be appreciated.
The thing missing from your post is the weight of what you are pulling.

I have an f150 and an f250 both with the same motor in them. But does that mean anything the f250 can pull safely the f150 can pull just because they have the same motor? No.

When it comes to pulling you have to think about -

Motor
Tranny
Towing Package
Tongue Weight
Being able to stop

Stopping safely is to me the 2nd biggest factor right behind how much can you pull.

And you have to think about this is the worst conditions - snow, ice, rain, not what you can do on a bright sunny day.

With all that said - we do tow the same trailers with either the f150 or the f250, but the f250 has a far larger margin of safety and a far less margin of wear and tear being put on it compared to the f150. But we still can tow with both.

The wear and tear factor is far greater on the F150. We have no doubt prematurely added wear and tear to the f150.

What is the weight you are towing, this is the most important fact.
 

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The f150 is a very good trailer tow truck. Ok it ain't got the capacity for payload like the F250 but they have upto a 11,300lb towing capacity, Trailer sway control, Intergrated brake controller which is interlinked with RSC and trailer sway, Tow & haul mode (this is not an overdrive mode but a system that changes shift points and gives you engine braking with the tap of brakes) 6 speed gearbox with great towing ratios, Engine has almost 400ft/lbs of TQ from a 5.4 gasser, The 6.2 Will have almost 500ft/lbs when released.

They are a very competent tower and you def wouldn't be disappointed.

By the way all these specs are on the new 09/10 models. pre 09 models dont have these options.

Also remember the F150's are a lot more comfortable and easier to hande in tight spaces. I never take our SD even with the 16ft and 20ft trailers. The f150 does them with ease.

Remember though you aint going to get deisel TQ from anything but the 6.2 so if you want to be able to tow a 11k trailer up a mountain at high speed then ya gonna need the 6.2. The Ecoboost will Also give you great flat TQ curve but all depends on what terrain you are manily driving.
 

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I had an 06 F-150 and pulled a 16' trailer. Trailer weight average was about 3,000 lb with trailer. The F-150 has no problem pulling the trailer around town. The problem occured on the highway. At speeds over 55 mph the truck would constantly down shift then up shift. The surface area of the trailer created that much drag. I tried knocking off the overdrive and the engine would screem. (Bad millage!!!) I do enough highway driving I traded up to an F-250 and love that the trailer does not even feel like it is back there.:clap:
 

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I pull a 6x10 trailer with a 2000 f-150, 5.4 v8. It pulls great in town but shifts up and down a lot on the hi-way. It doesn't pull it as well as my old Toyota 4runner did.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The thing missing from your post is the weight of what you are pulling.

I have an f150 and an f250 both with the same motor in them. But does that mean anything the f250 can pull safely the f150 can pull just because they have the same motor? No.

When it comes to pulling you have to think about -

Motor
Tranny
Towing Package
Tongue Weight
Being able to stop

Stopping safely is to me the 2nd biggest factor right behind how much can you pull.

And you have to think about this is the worst conditions - snow, ice, rain, not what you can do on a bright sunny day.

With all that said - we do tow the same trailers with either the f150 or the f250, but the f250 has a far larger margin of safety and a far less margin of wear and tear being put on it compared to the f150. But we still can tow with both.

The wear and tear factor is far greater on the F150. We have no doubt prematurely added wear and tear to the f150.

What is the weight you are towing, this is the most important fact.

Mike, well thought out questions, thanks for helping me brainstorm this. I honestly don't know what my tools weigh Best guess, between 2500-3000. The reason I guess this is the 6x12 I was hauling my tools in had a single 3500# axle & it was for sure overloaded. What's the weight of a 7x14? 1500# or so? That would put me around 4500#. Add to that another 2500# or so for flooring on those occasions I'm hauling materials to the job site in my trailer along with my tools. So, I'd say max load, including trailer weight, would be around 7-8000#.

My plan is to pull my trailer to the dealership & see if they won't let me hook onto it & pull it down the highway. I've got 25 years experience pulling heavy loads. I'll know within a very few miles if a half ton will be enough truck for me to feel safe in adverse conditions.

For some reason, I've got this feeling I either won't be trading, or I'll be trading for another f250. I was just hoping to get into something with better fuel mileage for a change.
 

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Mike, well thought out questions, thanks for helping me brainstorm this. I honestly don't know what my tools weigh Best guess, between 2500-3000. The reason I guess this is the 6x12 I was hauling my tools in had a single 3500# axle & it was for sure overloaded. What's the weight of a 7x14? 1500# or so? That would put me around 4500#. Add to that another 2500# or so for flooring on those occasions I'm hauling materials to the job site in my trailer along with my tools. So, I'd say max load, including trailer weight, would be around 7-8000#.

My plan is to pull my trailer to the dealership & see if they won't let me hook onto it & pull it down the highway. I've got 25 years experience pulling heavy loads. I'll know within a very few miles if a half ton will be enough truck for me to feel safe in adverse conditions.

For some reason, I've got this feeling I either won't be trading, or I'll be trading for another f250. I was just hoping to get into something with better fuel mileage for a change.
Your right on with the weight IMO.
I pull with a f150 and it's fine around town but on the interstate it is a pouch up and down shifting and soft swaying suspension. Before this I towed with a 1ton dually and couldn't tell the small enclosed was back there.
Cole
 

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i doubt the dealership will let you test tow it.. youd be better off to go home and get your trailer :thumbsup:
 

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I would try to go and rent an f-150 for the day, then take a nice trip on the freeway,backroads,hilly roads, etc. this way you can feel it out and it will only cost you about $100 or so!!

beats droppin 30-40K and then trading it in a year later!:whistling
 

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i think chevys have better towing capacitys then fords!!

i just sold my 06 f-150 crewcab lariat, sloppy handling with the 20s, maybe the newer ones are better?:shutup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
so you are trying to get better gas milage by down sizing to a 1/2 ton with a gas.
What do they get 18 maybe 14 or less towing?

I am not seeing any reason to down size. The 250 is perfect. Well maybe in a 2500 series!!

I run a lot of miles not hooked up to a trailer. I know I'm not going to better my mileage pulling my trailer.

With my diesel, I'm getting 14mpg empty & 10 pulling a trailer. Don't matter if it's my 18' trailer or my 12' trailer. Still 10mpg.
 

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I run a lot of miles not hooked up to a trailer. I know I'm not going to better my mileage pulling my trailer.

With my diesel, I'm getting 14mpg empty & 10 pulling a trailer. Don't matter if it's my 18' trailer or my 12' trailer. Still 10mpg.

Sounds like we use our trucks for similar amount of use. I looked at every half ton on the market and ended up with a Ford. Best tow capacity, Best safety features, Highest ranked, Proven engine and trans, Unmatched build quality and she looks dam good lol. To be honest a F250 is way more than you will need even for a 20ft trailer. my 7x14 has a GVWR of around 7000k lb and i have towed a 16 and a 20 on many occasions with our family F250 and the F150 and f150 is so much nicer to tow with. If i was towing 10k lb or more i would def consider a F250 but your in the 7000lb and less bracket which half tons have no issue with. Drive both and you will understand what im talking about. The f150 is smoother, quieter, More agile, more comfortable, easy to manover and gets great MPG. There was a reason it was voted 1/2 ton truck of the year in 2009 and more than likely 2010 also.
 

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Mike, well thought out questions, thanks for helping me brainstorm this. I honestly don't know what my tools weigh Best guess, between 2500-3000. The reason I guess this is the 6x12 I was hauling my tools in had a single 3500# axle & it was for sure overloaded. What's the weight of a 7x14? 1500# or so? That would put me around 4500#. Add to that another 2500# or so for flooring on those occasions I'm hauling materials to the job site in my trailer along with my tools. So, I'd say max load, including trailer weight, would be around 7-8000#..
You're doing about the same as me. I think with an f150 you'll feel the same way I do, that you are using an F150 more toward it's upper limits towing like that.

5000-6000 lbs to me would be the sweet spot on an F150, over that you're putting a lot of stress on the tranny and brakes.

Maybe it just depends on how much towing you are doing?

With your experience I think you will have it figured out pretty quickly with some real world experience that you are planning by testing it all out.

Good luck.
 

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I don't know about the ford but I used to drive a 1/2 ton dodge 4x4. I pulled a 7x16 trailer for 8 years with that truck. I had to put 2 leafs in the rear when I bought the bobcat though.;) The leaf spring work only cost $300.00. Do your regular matainance and you should be fine. Now I pull an 8.5 x 16 with a GMC 2500 van. Not the prettiest thing but its all mine:whistling. Looking for a truck but don't want any payments! Good luck!
Chad.
 

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I used a 1/2 ton suburban for working out of many years ago. after adding a leaf to the springs, the sag under load was fixed. some loads such as a tractor on a flatbed require a little extra front (tongue) load so the added weight was to much for the 1500 but added spring capacity solved the problem. will your trailer be more front heavy b/c of the tools and open area for materials?
 

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You're doing about the same as me. I think with an f150 you'll feel the same way I do, that you are using an F150 more toward it's upper limits towing like that.

5000-6000 lbs to me would be the sweet spot on an F150, over that you're putting a lot of stress on the tranny and brakes.

Maybe it just depends on how much towing you are doing?

With your experience I think you will have it figured out pretty quickly with some real world experience that you are planning by testing it all out.

Good luck.

I def wouldnt say a F150 is on it's upper limits at 7klbs. They are rated to tow around 11000+ lb's but if it was me i wouldnt do anymore than 10 with it.

Brakes also are not that much of an issue as your ment to have trailer brakes anyway but even if you didnt the new F150's have brakes bigger than most F250's. I think they are around 13.8-14" rotors which in my eyes is OTT for a half ton but if you do tow something in the 10k + lb's region and you have no trailer brakes then the f150 is gonna stop that trailer easy. I have towed our 16ft with way way over it's GVRW which didnt have trailer brakes connected and i guess it was around the 9-10k lbs and my 09 stopped it with zero problem from about 55mph. With trailer brakes it would have been less work on my pads without doubt but the F250 has no better brakeing than a F150.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I def wouldnt say a F150 is on it's upper limits at 7klbs. They are rated to tow around 11000+ lb's but if it was me i wouldnt do anymore than 10 with it.

Brakes also are not that much of an issue as your ment to have trailer brakes anyway but even if you didnt the new F150's have brakes bigger than most F250's. I think they are around 13.8-14" rotors which in my eyes is OTT for a half ton but if you do tow something in the 10k + lb's region and you have no trailer brakes then the f150 is gonna stop that trailer easy. I have towed our 16ft with way way over it's GVRW which didnt have trailer brakes connected and i guess it was around the 9-10k lbs and my 09 stopped it with zero problem from about 55mph. With trailer brakes it would have been less work on my pads without doubt but the F250 has no better brakeing than a F150.
You have no problems with it feeling loose pulling in the 7000# range?

The brakes were one of the biggest issues I was having. It's not that hard getting a load moving, the real trouble is when ya gotta stop it.

My sister's got a newer 1/2 ton short bed with crew cab. Maybe I'll just hook up my trailer to her truck & give it a run down the road before I go shopping for a new truck.
 
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