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Discussion Starter #1
Sorry for the amaturish question but I think contractors would be best to answer this, even though I am only a helper.

I have never worked in construction before. I only started about 3 months ago as an electrcians helper. The weather here is starting to become very hot.

The Journeyman electritian I work with most of the time (not the company owner) says I am supposed to bring the drinking water for each day.

The owner doesnt seem to want to get involved with such trivial matters.

Is the journeyman trying to take advantage of me? If it is indeed the custom for the helper to supply the icewater then I will find a way, even though I view the dollar a day for ice as thirty dollars a month I could spend on milk and food for my kid.

Thank you very much,
 

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I would hope that the journeyman is only joking with you! It usually is every man for himself. If anybody is going to supply water or anything for other workers it should be the owner.
 

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I supply ice&water for my crews. We work in FL, it is an absolute requirement.
As for an employee suppyling it, I'm with Glass and the others. I like Bob's answer best, I didn't start at the top.
 

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my company provides water for each day. the foreman picks it up daily. it's an 'industry standard'. OSHA requirements follow:

1926.51(a)

"Potable water."

1926.51(a)(1)

An adequate supply of potable water shall be provided in all places of employment.

1926.51(a)(2)

Portable containers used to dispense drinking water shall be capable of being tightly closed, and equipped with a tap. Water shall not be dipped from containers.

1926.51(a)(3)

Any container used to distribute drinking water shall be clearly marked as to the nature of its contents and not used for any other purpose.

1926.51(a)(4)

The common drinking cup is prohibited.

1926.51(a)(5)

Where single service cups (to be used but once) are supplied, both a sanitary container for the unused cups and a receptacle for disposing of the used cups shall be provided.
..1926.51(a)(6)

1926.51(a)(6)

"Potable water" means water which meets the quality standards prescribed in the U.S. Public Health Service Drinking Water Standards, published in 42 CFR part 72, or water which is approved for drinking purposes by the State or local authority having jurisdiction.
 

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Electrical Contractor
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Some contractors do provide water for for the guys, usually during the extreme heat.
Most do not.
It's up to you if you want water, bring it or get it in the morning.




Pipe,
I truly hope you wrote made that whole thing up.:eek: If so it is very funny.:cheesygri

If not then what a pathetic world we live in that we need an OSHA standard to tell us to drink clean water.:rolleyes::rolleyes:
These are some of the reasons I relish the fact that I am a small non-union contractor. I don't have to deal with that BS.
If I EVER had an OSHA guy come on site and show me that list I would laugh him off the site.
 

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I've have had crews working in the desert for 20 years and always supplied ice and water. some workers bring thier own. I always had plastic containers filled with water in the freezer and took one with me every day for my own use.
 

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DGR,IABD
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I provide the drinking water. All the trucks have a water jug holder built on them from the factory with a cup dispenser on the side of the water jug. I had one employer in the past that had a small ice machine right in the shop for us to fill up our water jugs. While I will agree that it is most normal for each man to bring his own stuff to drink, I am aware that drinking water is an OSHA requirement that is the employer's responsibility. In my area, the same guys that provide porta-potties can also set up portable drinking water stations. I'm one of those people that suffers from heat exhaustion quite easily if I don't keep hydrated, so I'm a little fussy about people getting plenty to drink, especially if its hot out. The journeyman in the original post is being a world class jerk off by making the helper bring him water. I'd bring him in some really good "water" all right.
 

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I bought an Ice machine and have a filtered water spigot for my guys.

Happy workers are productive workers.

As far as bringing him water, you can doctor him up a special jug ;)
 

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Rusty Nails said:
I bought an Ice machine...Happy workers are productive workers.
So does that mean your workers get Hawaiian ice? :cheesygri Nothing like 10 gallons of ice to make for some head shattering water. [/QUOTE]
 

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The OSHA standard for drinking water is correct. Your employer is obligated to furnish you with good drinking water. But I choose to bring my own in a plastic gallon jug. It can be stashed in the shade somewhere. I don't care to drink water somebody else prepared, and what I bring costs almost nothing.

Excuse me, toastermaker, for being presumptuous, but I figure you are either young, inexperienced, or both. In any case, don't let the old timers rattle you when it comes to your health. If I could go back in time, I'd have taken better care of myself and ignored my macho impulses. That is, when you get that feeling that you need to impress someone, or act like you're a cool guy, stop and listen to the quiet voice telling you not to be stupid. That quiet voice is often right. And this post reflects that you have the good judgement to listen.

Point is, don't rely on the yahoos you work with to care about you. Most of them don't. But don't be like them. As you gain experience, share it with the young and new guys.

For example, never trust a guardrail. Did you put it up? If so, who screwed with it afterwards? Or if you see material on the ground, never step on it. It may be covering a hole and unable to support your weight. If you don't stand on concrete or earth, you may find yourself learning about the physics of falling objects.

Not sorry for the rant, I earned the right by surviving.

:cheesygri
 

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"His fault" don't cut it from a hospital bed, does it?

Bob

GCMan said:
The OSHA standard for drinking water is correct. Your employer is obligated to furnish you with good drinking water. But I choose to bring my own in a plastic gallon jug. It can be stashed in the shade somewhere. I don't care to drink water somebody else prepared, and what I bring costs almost nothing.

Excuse me, toastermaker, for being presumptuous, but I figure you are either young, inexperienced, or both. In any case, don't let the old timers rattle you when it comes to your health. If I could go back in time, I'd have taken better care of myself and ignored my macho impulses. That is, when you get that feeling that you need to impress someone, or act like you're a cool guy, stop and listen to the quiet voice telling you not to be stupid. That quiet voice is often right. And this post reflects that you have the good judgement to listen.

Point is, don't rely on the yahoos you work with to care about you. Most of them don't. But don't be like them. As you gain experience, share it with the young and new guys.

For example, never trust a guardrail. Did you put it up? If so, who screwed with it afterwards? Or if you see material on the ground, never step on it. It may be covering a hole and unable to support your weight. If you don't stand on concrete or earth, you may find yourself learning about the physics of falling objects.

Not sorry for the rant, I earned the right by surviving.

:cheesygri
 

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Yer gettin' snowed Toaster. Its a case of the grizzled old veteran taking advantage of the new guy. Go buy milk for your kid and tell him to bring his own water since he probably makes twice+ what you do he can better afford that buck a day anyhow.
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
Thank you all for your replies.
Based on the unanimus response, I am no longer going to worry that I am not doing my job properly just because I don't bring ice water for the journeyman to drink.
Thanks again for your help,

ps
Special thanks to GCMan for stressing the safety factor for a beginner like me. When I watch the journeyman and see how cavilier he acts about everything it makes me think I am being overly cautious.
You reminded that even if others can do this stuff with thier eyes closed, I still need to stay on my toes, use common sense, and follow good saftey practices. Hopefully I will never get so relaxed around electricity to accidentally blow my arm off or get myself or someone else killed.
 

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Yeah, Toatermaker, it's a funny thing. It's an ancient tradition to mess with a greenhorn's head. But it should be about wives and girlfriends, not safety, lol!

Just keep in mind that the old timers who are teasing you are the ones who survived their own stupidity, the dead and disabled aren't on the job to play with you.

BTW, do you think the company who employs this yahoo wants a tard like him? And if they do, do you plan to stay with such an outfit?

You get it, glad we could help.

PS: Being in a hurry is rarely productive, but your lazy-ass boss who failed to plan ahead may think so. This is how people get hurt or die.
 

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Cable/emt stretcher

When I worked as a "helper" I was told to go out to the truck and bring in the cable stretcher (sometimes they'd ask for the EMT stretcher).

It didn't take too long to figure that one out... the guffaws were one hint :confused:

Bob

toastermaker said:
Thank you all for your replies.
Based on the unanimus response, I am no longer going to worry that I am not doing my job properly just because I don't bring ice water for the journeyman to drink.
Thanks again for your help,
 
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