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to me engineer or solid floor look the same please advise whic one is the best and what is the differnce. always thnak you. :Thumbs:
 

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Solid floors are attached to a subfloor in some way. They do not sound very hollow at all.
Engineered will float over any flat, smooth, level substrate, so it can enable you to easily install.
It will sound a bit more hollow, and can have a thin sandable surface. But some have a thick surface

www.kahrs.com for my fav engineered wood.

Engineered wood is more stable for my area.
 

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Engineered are good, but man-made and 'repetitive' looking. They therefore tend to look better in small areas than they do in large ones.

Real wood looks much more natural, will accept multiple sandings, and therefore have a much longer life.
 

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Flor may have missed your question. Solid floors are a single planks of wood, they can cup, crown and generally misbehave. An 'engineered' plank is like plywood and is more stable.

Refinishing brings on another topic. Wood floors can be refinished many times. Engineered flooring depends on the quality.
 

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If you want the life of a solid, but the stability of engineered go with that owens wood. It is veneered but the top layer is equal to that of a solid. So it can be sanded and refinished multiple times. It is a hot item around here, It is also good because it comes pre-sanded but still requires a light sanding before finishing. Some guys get by with screening it but we usually hit it with 100 grit then screen. It comes with square edged or beveled. If it was a golf ball Tiger Woods would hit it all day long.
 

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Think about the moisture level where you live. Solid wood will cup if you live in a high moisture area, especially if your subfloor has gaps. True, engineered floors have a thin layer of veneer, their finishes are baked on at the factory and are much longer-lasting than finishes applied on-site. I'd consider solid wood if it's pre-finished because of this fact. Plus no dust in the job site and you're in and out quicker.

Another tip I just learned -- if you're in a high moisture area, you can follow all the manufacturer's installation instructions, and if the floor cups and the customer calls out the manufacturer to inspect, they will still find it "100% installer error". After follwing every instruction by the manufacturer, they came back at me asking if I tested the moisture content of the subfloor and if I sealed the subfloor. And where was that in the instructions?

So after tearing out the floor (for free), I caulked every seam in the subfloor and am using a subfloor sealer which guarantees the wood floor installed for the life of the floor. Yup, I believe that one too. Now I get to install the floor for free as well.
 

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ccoffer said:
Subfloor sealer? Like for plywood?? That might be the dumbest thing I ever heard.
Yep. Check Bosticks web site for subfloor sealer. It's supposed to work pretty good.
 

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Subfloor sealer

Yup, I never heard or thought of sealing a subfloor. But when you're stuck with a report from an "expert" which says since you didn't seal the subfloor and you're at fault, then you have to tear the entire thing out and replace it for free, you may change your mind. In the future, I will always provide in writing the opportunity for my customers to choose or decline to have their subfloor sealed. If they decline, I will state that their declining absolves me of any liability if the floor cups or warps.
 

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Are you really talking about a wood subfloor? Wouldn't it just be easier and better for the house to make sure the subfloor isn't getting wet? Plastic in the crawlspace and plenty of vents?
 

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GriffDecker said:
Yup, I never heard or thought of sealing a subfloor. But when you're stuck with a report from an "expert" which says since you didn't seal the subfloor and you're at fault, then you have to tear the entire thing out and replace it for free, you may change your mind. In the future, I will always provide in writing the opportunity for my customers to choose or decline to have their subfloor sealed. If they decline, I will state that their declining absolves me of any liability if the floor cups or warps.

That will not hold up in court..Sorry. Im not a lawyer but Ive read related stories in magazines.
 

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GriffDecker said:
Yup, I never heard or thought of sealing a subfloor. But when you're stuck with a report from an "expert" which says since you didn't seal the subfloor and you're at fault, then you have to tear the entire thing out and replace it for free, you may change your mind. In the future, I will always provide in writing the opportunity for my customers to choose or decline to have their subfloor sealed. If they decline, I will state that their declining absolves me of any liability if the floor cups or warps.
Like adams said, liability release clauses are not worth the paper they are written on once they cross the courthouse threshold.
But the story isn't making a lot of sense, if this is really about a wood subfloor. No industry standards, anywhere, even mention sealing a wood subfloor. Its just not healthy for the house to have a wet wood subfloor. No qualified "expert" would suggst that either. An inspector might say that you were at fault if they could prove that you failed to take moisture readings, or laid the material on a wet substrate. Or that you installed the floor knowing of poor drainage under the house without suggesting mitigating action, etc. Either we are not getting the whole story, or you rolled over way too quick.

As an aside, I wonder what the consequences of suggesting plastic in the crawllspace, but the owner refusing. Would the contractor be liable if the floor cupped during an exceptional wet season?
 

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That will not hold up in court..Sorry. Im not a lawyer but Ive read related stories in magazines
Yup, the judge will expect you to be a pro.
 

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Simply need to install a moisture barrier between your subfloor and the wood floor; such as #30 felt(tar paper) or #15 felt. This is the norm around N.C.
 
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