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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK, so our own projects always come last after getting the ones that pay the bills complete. As I have stated before I am not a roofer, so I am asking the question to those who specialize. I have 2 sections of roof to complete, witer has finally hit here in NH, one is on the north side of the house a couple hours of work, but the frost stays on the underlayment all day, I would prefer to shingle it without the frost undernieth, but if Ishingle over it(frost) will this cause me long term problems, in which case I may as well just tarp and wait for a really warm day? The roof literallygets no sun at this time of year. Being well ventilated it does not heat up much to speak of either.
 

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OK, so our own projects always come last after getting the ones that pay the bills complete. As I have stated before I am not a roofer, so I am asking the question to those who specialize. I have 2 sections of roof to complete, witer has finally hit here in NH, one is on the north side of the house a couple hours of work, but the frost stays on the underlayment all day, I would prefer to shingle it without the frost undernieth, but if Ishingle over it(frost) will this cause me long term problems, in which case I may as well just tarp and wait for a really warm day? The roof literallygets no sun at this time of year. Being well ventilated it does not heat up much to speak of either.
Shingle away, you are worrying too much. I have shingled straight through the winter with no problems later. We get 100+"'s a year.

Just be very carefull about scaffolding etc while you are on the roof!:thumbsup:
 

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You'd be surprised how easy the frost sweeps off of felt. I still wouldn't worry about it. If there was ice under the felt, then you'd have a few problems when it thawed.
 

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Torch them down:w00t::laughing::laughing:

If everyone followed the idea temperatures on the package it would only be a spring and fall business. I don’t know any outfit ever that can charge enough in 2 seasons to get through a year
.
 

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Don't lay felt over frost and don't lay shingles over frost. Done it and learned the hard way with nail pops. Of course they were on new builds with sup's breathing down my neck to get the roof done.

As far as my season we have one tear off we'd still like to do since the Timberlines at 12 years old are severly cracked and we suspect 25 sheets of bad decking will need to be replaced. This roof will need to be done sooner than later.

Other than that just a few new roofs to do. One is getting framed now, a 75 sq 8/12.
 

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Sweep the frost down before installing the shingles, your nails may stop prematurely from the build up of frost and end up being pop ups come spring time after everything thaws out.

I stop scheduling re-roofs in November but work new construction year round.
We will occasionally do a re-roof in the winter but not often.
The one we are working on right now will be our last for the year, we were to busy to get it done last month and the home owner can't wait till March.

Shingles on northern exposure sections will take a longer time to seal in the winter but if properly fastened you'll be ok.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I am using tri-flex underlayment and shooting 1 3/4" nails on the Landmark TL's. I am only concerned about the affects of moisture lieing under the shingles. Sealing is not a huge concern, as I know what to expect there! And of course one last valley to form. But I am keeping 2 bundles of shingles in the basement(in the same room as my wood stove) and as long as it is above freezing I haven't had any problems with them cracking coming across the valley, although last weekend I did use the heat gun on Lo-temp for the first weave course as the valley seemed to be extra deep at the base(gotta love old work). The rest of the courses layed in the valley just fine with the heat from my hands at 35 degrees.
 

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Frost isn't a biggie, just sweep it off and you're good to go. With any small amount of moisture it should dry off from the heat of the house without any major issue.

We go year round, generally speaking re-roofs are not encouraged, but there are outfits out there who do, with the realization a few wet days during spring are spent servicing callbacks regarding roof debris on the ground to pick up (shingles, nails paper).

Nailing is the biggest issue, if they dont set well enough, do so manually (with a hammer). If they blow through, add another.

Ideally it would be nice to take the winter off, but reallistically it isn't going to happen.

This week has been extrememly quiet...temperatures in the minus 20's-30's with wind, and a ton of snow. Some places have drifts over 6 feet deep. Good time to get caught up on paperwork/beer. :thumbsup:
 

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August cut-off

We don't install roofs any later than August.

You need GOOD HOT SUNSHINE to heat the shingles to the point where the tar tabs underneath will melt and seal before winter sets in. You still get some decent sunshine in September but don't count on it.

If the tar tabs don't seal before winter, dust and dirt blow up underneath the shingles and prevent the melting tar tabs to contact the shingles below for good adhesion. Tar stuck to dust does nothing.

With the cost involved and warranty issues from the shingle manufacturer, why take a chance.
 

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We don't install roofs any later than August.

You need GOOD HOT SUNSHINE to heat the shingles to the point where the tar tabs underneath will melt and seal before winter sets in. You still get some decent sunshine in September but don't count on it.

If the tar tabs don't seal before winter, dust and dirt blow up underneath the shingles and prevent the melting tar tabs to contact the shingles below for good adhesion. Tar stuck to dust does nothing.

With the cost involved and warranty issues from the shingle manufacturer, why take a chance.
How in GOds name do you earn a living if you are a roofing contractor?

Trust me, your shingles will be fine if you do it all year. Been doing it for years on all types of substates with only an occasional problem with nail pops.

With that much OCD you would be better suited to be a finish carpenter.
 

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Hey JTW, Frost should not hurt if you go over it, as the felt paper is there as a vapor barrier and that is its job, under the shingles or as temporary water protection from rain. The biggest problem as I see it is trying to roof your home with frost on the roof! My suggestion would be to tarp the roof, (ie, w/ 6 mil visqueen), the night before you want to roof it, make sure you have the heat or wood stove in the house going, the tarp will capture a lot of the heat trying to escape from the home, then that morning, pull the tarps and roof away. If you don't finish the roof, be sure and tarp it again that night, and repeat above. Always watch out for frost, ice, etc. Frost, Ice and roofing DO NOT MIX! As far as the tar tabs sticking before the sunshine heats them, that will only be a concern, if you live in a designated high wind area, (over sustained 80 MPH winds). The asphalt tabs are only there for wind uplift. This is not as much an issue with the advent of the new dimensional shingles, as the old 3-tab shingles allowed wind to enter from 3 sides, of each tab, which allowed a higher chance for the wind to blow off the shingle, the "wind blowoff" is a lot less likely with the new "strip" shingles. Wind can only come in underneath the shingle and if you (6) nail a shingle, "wind blow off" is even less likely. Good Luck!
 

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Hey JTW, I read your next post, are you "weaving" your valleys with a CertainTeed Presidential TL shingle? As I am aware, as a Select Shingle Roofer with CertainTeed, with regard to you valleys, you need to run a minimum #30-36" ASTM rated felt, or if you are in snow country, I would use a minimum of a CertainTeed Smooth SA (peel-n-stick), underlayment underneath a minimum, 24"wide, 26 gauge, thick, valley metal and cut the shingle short of the "W" back about 1 1/2"? I don't think they will warrant a "weaved" TL valley? I might be wrong? Does anyone have any other info on this?
 

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per the msa book:

"open valleys are recomended; however closed cut valleys are also acceptable. woven valleys are not recomended when applying Presidential and Presidential TL because the laminated shingle can buckle and become damaged when shaped into the valley"
 
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