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Making Things Accessible
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Discussion Starter #1
There are 4 methods to create a barrier free shower for ...one is using a trench drain recessed into the floor.

There are many considerations when implementing this solution, but from a plumbing standpoint, do you see a problem with the trench drain being the only drain in this shower?

Also, does anyone have experience with specific trench drain manufacturers for this application?

I'm creating the specs for the job so I thought I'd ask.

Thanks for the feedback/comments.
 

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There shouldn't be a problem with it being the sole drain as long as it has at least a standard 1-1/2" opening to connect to the line with.

I did notice a few things, not to be nit-picky, but just trying to be helpful. Usually in my experience fall in a custom shower pan slope is recommended to be 1/4" per foot, which is double what you've got there. Also, I'm sure that's just a rough draft, but I would consider lowering those shower head holsters (or at least one of them) a bit. They're a little high for someone confined to a wheelchair. Also I wouldn't put any kind of casing trim, even vinyl, inside the shower as it gives a perfect place for water to sit and mold to form. I'd stop it short of turning the corner into the shower and short of the trench drain.
 

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Making Things Accessible
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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the thoughts.

For larger showers, its preferred to have 1/8" drop per foot. For smaller showers, its recommended to use 1/4" drop to contain water as quick as possible.

I agree on the floor molding...I haven't figured out how to make that a flush rendering but I'm working on it.

The client has a C6 spinal cord injury so he's max assist/dependent with showering. The hand held showers will be placed for caregiver use only. A big consideration is the number of different caregivers using the hand held over the life of the shower...they will vary in height/right-vs-left handed, etc. I typically follow universal design concepts when addressing building aspects for a large population -vs- use by the individual using the wheelchair.
 

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Making Things Accessible
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Discussion Starter #6
I agree on the slider...I'm missing the CAD symbol in my program. The slider is functional but you need to be careful cause its not intended to be a grab bar (at least the ones I've installed) so some client/caregiver education is needed.

I actually installed 2 water sources (opposite wall) in the last project...one for able-bodied users and the other for the individual using a wheelchair.

The on/off switch on the shower head is a must. There's a ton of hand held showers out there which are more about aesthetics then function and don't have this option. A good "value" hand held is by Moen which is distributed by creative specialties.
 

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Carpe Diem
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I think code would dictate some of the placements and specs.

And the spec is 1/4"/foot to drain. There is no additional spec based on size of sq ft of the shower floor.

I know this would definitely be debatable, but I'm thinking the drain may work better if put towards the back.
 

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Making Things Accessible
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Discussion Starter #8
Regards codes for residential accessibility, in most jurisdictions, they don't exists. I would be cautious in using the ADA (or other codes) for residential accessibility because those standards are for public accommodation which might/may not work for a single user. For example, a 5'2" 100 lb person using a rolling shower chair independently has completely different needs compared to an individual ambulating with assistive devices transferring in/out of the shower area. In most cases, my projects involve just one disabled client and using the ADA code would result in an environment which works 80% of the time.

Residential accessibility is a gray area and creating a functional environment is always a challenge considering the client's medical needs, assistive devices being used, and the limitations/characteristics of the structure.
 

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I don't disagree with you. However, I've seen the inspectors themselves have very different opinions on what to do. Unfortunately, we are at their mercy.

I'm lucky enough to know the plumbing inspector in my town very well. He is open to interpreting when it comes to those grey areas. I have dealt with others that are not. I had one complain I didn't have green board on a tub surround (I used Durock :rolleyes:).

I do like the idea of the channel drain but something keeps bugging me by having it towards the entrance of the shower. I guess if something accidentally blocked the drain (to some extent) the water would then be able to bridge the channel and get into the toilet area. If the drain was at the back side, that would happen. Although, in that case, the water could dam and then overflow into the toilet area. :blink:
 

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Making Things Accessible
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Discussion Starter #10
good point on rear-vs-front location.

Since the client needs water at the toilet (hand held shower will extend over), I'll slope the floor under the wall mounted toilet towards the drain. This will help with your point/concern but not completely solve it. Below is what I'm thinking...still needs a lot more detail.

The problem with a rear wall trench is the front of the shower will be 3/4" higher than the back. That would then require the bathroom floor to be 3/4" higher than the finished floor in the hallway. I would need to lose that differential over the remaining bathroom floor. All floor surfaces need to flush and continuous without a change in elevation. Its a tricky balance between continuous floors and water retention :w00t:.

I was going to recommend the Quick Drain in the rear but wanted to work the front drain option first cause it eliminates the floor height differential. Its all preliminary at this point so I'm flexible!
 

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Eric Anderson, do you install w/c lifts, stairlifts, patient lifts etc?

I used to do that is VA and a little MD and NC. Just wondering if you get into that part or more bricks and mortar items.
 

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Making Things Accessible
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Discussion Starter #12
I've been installing lifts, ramps, and other accessibility equipment since 1996 locally in the Greater Baltimore area. I still own the business but I no longer operate it...my staff handles that. Over the past 3 years, I've been acting as a national consultant for insurance carriers.
 

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It sounded like you might. I installed van equipment, stairlifts and platform lifts of various makes. Also did elevators and overhead patient lifts (Barrier free was a major model) really liked the patient lifts and elevators.

Like the work alot, but was not happy with the money.
 

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I am sure there is a reason it has not being mention (angus). What about the kerdi drain, they even show a detail of a disabled shower waterproofing the whole area using a combination of kerdi and ditra. I am using this set up on a curbless shower, for a nice clean look.
 

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Carpe Diem
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IMO, the Kerdi-Drain is the single best thing to happen to tiling showers.

However, I do see the advantage of using the channel drain in this situation. You don't have to pitch 4 separate sections towards a central drain. You just have 1 pitch of the entire floor towards a drain. That, to me, would be beneficial to someone in a wheel chair.

However, stay tuned for more about this :shifty:
 

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I'm with Angus on the 1/4:12 being the minimum allowed codewise and wonder if ponding will occur with 1/8:12. As for no residential ADA regulations that's true and I told a plan checker that and he told me that while there are no specific regulations if one starts doing a set of plans and starts providing instructions that look like they are falling along the lines of the ADA then the inspectors expect everything done to follow those guidelines.
 

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Choosing your grill cover and drain placement

The linear drain you show above is an European model and will not be suitable for your North America project.

If the drain you are placing is at the entry like shown in your mock up - you may consider a wave pattern like this one from Quick Drain USA...

This drain style was designed in part to prevent water from travelling across the grill.

good point on rear-vs-front location.

Since the client needs water at the toilet (hand held shower will extend over), I'll slope the floor under the wall mounted toilet towards the drain. This will help with your point/concern but not completely solve it. Below is what I'm thinking...still needs a lot more detail.

The problem with a rear wall trench is the front of the shower will be 3/4" higher than the back. That would then require the bathroom floor to be 3/4" higher than the finished floor in the hallway. I would need to lose that differential over the remaining bathroom floor. All floor surfaces need to flush and continuous without a change in elevation. Its a tricky balance between continuous floors and water retention :w00t:.

I was going to recommend the Quick Drain in the rear but wanted to work the front drain option first cause it eliminates the floor height differential. Its all preliminary at this point so I'm flexible!
 

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Eric, what software are you using? If it is a Punch software product such as Home Design, you go to the trim section of the materials menu and scroll all the way down. and select the "no trim image" which is either blank or a circle with a line through it. If you do this with the wall selected, it will change to no trim. Hope this helps.
 
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