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Does anyone have some links to building handicap ramps? I googled and found mostly nonsense. I found a site a year or so ago but I don't remember how or the address.
Thanks.
 

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If i think back, we used to go for every 1" in heigh we would have to go a foot in length. Anything after 12 feet in length needs a landing / break area so the person or persons can stop for a minute and take a break.

BJD
 

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The latest issue of Proffesional Deck Builder has some decent info, and I believe Bjd is correct, 1/12 slope is max.
 

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IRC 2003 Code

MinConst said:
Does anyone have some links to building handicap ramps? I googled and found mostly nonsense. I found a site a year or so ago but I don't remember how or the address.
Thanks.
Wherever IRC 2003 Code is being used, the maximum slope for a ramp is 1:8.

Although I would still suggest a 1:12 if practical.
 

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MinConst said:
Does anyone have some links to building handicap ramps? I googled and found mostly nonsense. I found a site a year or so ago but I don't remember how or the address.
Thanks.
Minconst, if your seriuosly getting into the handicap retrofit business,you might want to pickup a ada code book. Try www.contractor-books.com
 

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No IRC Difference Between "Ramp" and "Handicap Ramp"

Tom R said:
I thought it was 1:8 for a 'ramp', - - but 1:12 for a 'handicap ramp'.
Tom:

International Residential Code 2003 only uses the term "ramp" and makes no distinction for ramps used exclusively for handicap egress. The maximum slope is 1:8.

R311.6 RAMPS.
R311.6.1 Maximum Slope. Ramps shall have a maximum slope of 1 unit vertical in eight units horizontal (12.5 percent slope.)


The commercial International Building Code 2003 may vary.

A lower slope like a 1:12 slope is a safer slope in my opinion, but of course this increases the cost and the overall length.

ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) requirements only apply to commercial/public buildings and are not enforceable for private residences but they are still good guidelines to observe.
 

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homebild said:
Tom:

ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) requirements only apply to commercial/public buildings and are not enforceable for private residences but they are still good guidelines to observe.

Thanks, Homebuild, - - good info, - - but in my area, - - the 1:12 is enforced on local residences (for handicapped).

Don't know how it works in the rest of the country, - - but around here the National and/or IRC codes are just the required minimum, - - the 'local code' is always at least that and oft-times more.
 

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I built a ramp for my wife's grandfather when he became wheel chair bound. I went 1:12. It does make for a long ramp. I had to put in two platforms which were 5x5 for the wheel chair and operator to turn. This was a small old village house with steps up both the side entrance and front! I ended up cutting in a pato door in the back of the house with a 8x8 deck. I made the ramp removable by putting plywood on the posts for the ramp and bolting in sections. When grandfather past on we gave the ramp to a needy family.
Sorry for the long post, but definitly go 1:12. If you are having a service help with transportation or loading they may not help if it is less than 1:12. That is my case in the North East. Good luck.
 

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GMW, I believe that you are on the right track. Make it comfortable for the one involved. The donation was more than generous. Many of us may be there someday.
This is a contractors site and we have to deal with legalities which is why I recommended the ADA site. It gives you a guideline to fall back on if you are sued, commonplace here.
I reiterate, the State flag of Florida is a seopena.
 
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