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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Guys I got a job with a situation similar to the layout in this picture below. I'm not a big fan of sanitary T's on toilet waste lines but they are used around here on almost every build but I hate using them as I don't feel they have enough sweep to clear the pipe of waste but space is extremely tight and even the 3" copper sanitary T in there before was snug and I'm even having trouble getting a PVC sanitary T in there but I can just about sneak it in. I have never seen a blockage from using then on their sides but I know its not recommended to use them like this. An advice on if I should adjust the joists or stick with the sanitary t in this situation like almost every other build around here has done.

This ain't my picture but its basically shows what's going on with my issue.




image-4058339025.jpg
 

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I'm not a plumber but is a clean out needed since there is no access to the clean out? Then you could use a sweep 45.
 

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Everything about that is a code violation in every state. You are doing the customer a serious disservice by installing this without proper knowledge.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Again that's not my picture I posted that to show the way the toilet is plumbed in currently with the sanitary T on its back. I forgot to take a pic whilst i was at the job. The homes in this area I work on are all plumbed with these T's mounted this way but I'm not a fan of using them for numerous reasons. I ended up removing the sanitary T and messed with the framing some so I could get a wye in there instead. I have no idea how these get passed around here on the inspections as even a noob knows its a bad idea.
 

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Again that's not my picture I posted that to show the way the toilet is plumbed in currently with the sanitary T on its back. I forgot to take a pic whilst i was at the job. The homes in this area I work on are all plumbed with these T's mounted this way but I'm not a fan of using them for numerous reasons. I ended up removing the sanitary T and messed with the framing some so I could get a wye in there instead. I have no idea how these get passed around here on the inspections as even a noob knows its a bad idea.
Gotcha.

Did you need a hand with lay out still? I can make a quick drawing.
 

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Thom
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Here laying a san T on it's back would get you a correction notice. If you told the inspector there was not enough space to do otherwise he would respond that if there were inadequate space it's because you planned your layout poorly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
thom said:
Here laying a san T on it's back would get you a correction notice. If you told the inspector there was not enough space to do otherwise he would respond that if there were inadequate space it's because you planned your layout poorly.
They pass them here all the time even when there is space. It never blocked in the 30years the home has been there but you can put money on it that once I changed it out for PVC with the same layout it would have blocked in a week after tile went down.

It is crazy what you will see passed around here. The spec homes always have code violations. The customs seem to be pretty nicely done but even they have quite a few also.
 

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I totally agree with Thom.....laying a sanitary tee on its back is a big no no! It is totally against code to lay a tee on its back for the purpose of draining or venting.
 

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The Grand Wazoo
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I totally agree with Thom.....laying a sanitary tee on its back is a big no no! It is totally against code to lay a tee on its back for the purpose of draining or venting.
Maybe your code, not mine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Regardless of code.....it's not good practice nor good plumbing!
I would say yes and no. Yes because its done on almost every house in this area and i never see issues with it but no because i wouldnt want to be the one guy who installed it that same way because everyone else does then have to tear up the bathroom to adjust it because it got blocked up.
 

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Maybe your code, not mine.
Remember though, some states have weak codes and weak enforcement policies. They give everybody a license and they call themselves plumbers.

Other States like ours are hard core. I knew a guy from Florida who wrote and failed his masters here like 5-6 times. He just couldn't do it. It's over 8 hours long.

He moved back to Florida and gave up.

Perspective
 

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The Grand Wazoo
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Remember though, some states have weak codes and weak enforcement policies. They give everybody a license and they call themselves plumbers.
Oh trust me, I know, when I see some of things that pass code in other states I am thankful that I still live and work some where that makes knowledge and skill a requirement to perform the job.

I call it the "If you can't glue it I can't do it" syndrome.
 

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Capra Aegagrus
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Oh trust me, I know, when I see some of things that pass code in other states I am thankful that I still live and work some where that makes knowledge and skill a requirement to perform the job.
Having to deal with excessively restrictive code requirements has little to do with skill. Or knowledge, outside of rote memorization.
 
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