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What material would i expect to see in a 1900 home. Trying to figure out my max spans for true 2x6 joist but i have no idea what type and grade of material to put into the calculator to figure this out. What options could i use as to be safe if im not sure.

here's the site im using Joist Span Calc
It was usually timber that was either cut down on site or close.

Most common would be Red Oak or Chestnut. In your location I may be inclined to think southern yellow pine as well.
 

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WarnerConstInc. said:
It was usually timber that was either cut down on site or close. Most common would be Red Oak or Chestnut. In your location I may be inclined to think southern yellow pine as well.
Thanks man. I think its pine but I'm gonna send an engineer over there to figure this thing out. didn't realize there's so many options to pick from. There's a massive difference between there span capability of each type too.
 

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Could be anything. Roanoke, IIRC, had a train line in the 1880s and before, so stuff could have easily been shipped in. Add to that anything which could have been cut locally, and it's wide open.

Darcy's area was one of the big lumber and millwork centers in the US in 1900 and later, the stuff was shipped all over.
 

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Almost always oak up here.

Some pine......but in my experience, mostly oak.
 

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I though oak would have been better than pine but its weaker based on that online calculator. how is that even possible?
Makes absolutely no sense to me.

Maybe strength to weight ratio???

I thought when I did it (a few times) on that calculator, oak allowed a slightly longer span. (????) :rolleyes:
 

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Elastomeric fiber bending, gentlemen. That's how.

According to this 2005 edition of design values for rafters and joists published by the American Forest and Paper Association, a No. 2 Red Oak 2x6 has a design value in bending(Fb) of 1,195 where repetitive members are spaced not more than 24 inches.
Southern Pine - 1,440.

Of course, god only knows what grade Oak you have there, or what grade Pine, what region it came from, or what hick farmer notched the ends to sit on a beam which in essence turns it from a 2x6 into a 2x4.

Bottom line - Quit raggin on Pine. It's a quality tree.
 

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No. 1 (construction use) is sound, tight-knotted stock, containing only a few minor defects. No. 1 has no knotholes or other serious defects. It must be suitable for use as grain-tight lumber. Used for siding, cornices, shelving, paneling, some furniture.


No. 2 (standard use) grade has more and larger knots and blemishes than No. 1.


No. 3 (utility use) contains a few defects, larger and coarser than those in No. 2; for example, occasional knotholes. Does not take paint well. Used for crates, sheathing, subflooring, small furniture parts.


No. 4 is low-quality material, contains serious defects like knotholes, checks, shakes and decay.


No. 5 commonly holds together only under ordinary handling and where appearance is not important. This kind of wood is not paintable.
 

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As Rose stated in her book on Sears homes,S.Y.P. was the wood of choice. As Die. stated,in Chicago area,Doug Fir was wood of choice.(Chicago land does not have any forests to speak about).
 

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I have always assumed that DF was the default around here and everywhere. Never considered it was anything else.

I suppose if they were kit homes, they could be something else though. Learn something new every day.

Now I'll have to keep my eyes out for other wood types. Oak would never cross my mind as being used for framing.
 

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I have always assumed that DF was the default around here and everywhere. Never considered it was anything else.

I suppose if they were kit homes, they could be something else though. Learn something new every day.

Now I'll have to keep my eyes out for other wood types. Oak would never cross my mind as being used for framing.
You are in the land of Firs.

Red oak around here as far as you can see.
 
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