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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
got some Boral to experiment with before I use it on jobs. The dealer I got it from has 1" and 3/4" thicknesses. I routinely replace 1 1/4" thick rotted wood window sills. So I would need to laminate 2 pieces of Boral to get 1 1/2" then thickness plane down to 1 1/4" . 2 questions: what glue for Boral would work best for face gluing 2 pieces together, and will this stuff kill my high speed steel planer blades? The spec sheet recommends mostly different brands of construction adhesives tubes. I use a lot of West Systems epoxy, would this be a good glue? The tech spec sheet also recommends carbide tooling and nothing is mentioned in there about thickness planing. I also have a drum sander that I could use to thickness, but it would be alot slower than the planer.
 

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Tom Struble said:
what kind of window sills would need to be 1 1/4'' the full depth of the window?seems to me just the nosing would need to be
Older brick framed houses, but they're usually 2 1/2 thick at the brick face, and deeper than the window.

Eh.

I'm having trouble understanding the OP,
so.

Borate!
 

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TBFGhost said:
If I needed to thickness plane it, I would buy a cheap portable planer off CL.
If I needed to thickness plane it, I would find an exterior "wood" alternative to this solution.

If Boral is at all similar to Miratec/MDF, that would be the last power tool I would consider for this material.

Even HSS, planer blades are gonna be shot halfway through the first pass.

By the time you by a POS, Thickness planer off of CL, you're probably beyond the cost of a rough sawn slab of cypress or even teak.

This just doesn't make sense to me.

Anytime you're thinking of planing an MDF like material, your barking up the wrong tree.

Just my two cents.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
that's why I am asking if anyone tried it. I was afraid of it killing the blades. Im just thinking ahead and trying to decide whether its worth the effort to use Boral for this purpose. The next job I have is the woodpecker damage on the corners as I posted before. I am definitely going to use it there 3/4" thickness. This post is just for my own experimental reasons. Trying to figure out the material. One time I tried to plane down an old 4 x 4 that was stained with solid color exterior stain. The blades were shot before it was finished coming out the other end of the planer! That's why I was scared to try it with the Boral. In my original post I was wrong about the thickness of the sills. I meant to say 1 1/8" thick , with the offset in the nosing. Most of them are 1950s and 1960s vintage homes with old Andersen style windows set in brick. Usually the bottom of the brickmold and sills are shot. I try to use cedar, Spanish cedar, or thermally modified ash for those sills. Was just thinking about the Boral as a substitute for those woods(no backpriming needed would save some time).
 

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Sorry man,

I'm having a bit of trouble with the theme of this thread.

Don't take this the wrong way;

Is this your only resource for info in the trades?

If it is, okay. I'll re-adjust my expectations.

I read your intro.

I've read some of the threads you started.

We don't mind fielding these type of questions but it seems that all your posts are these type of questions. Answers that can be found with a little bit of research.

In my experience, with a new product or technique, read everything in print you can about it.

Experiment. Talk to suppliers.

I'm not trying to bust your stones, but it feels like your using this forum as "Cliff Notes".

If I'm wrong, feel free to blast me.
 

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I actually used it to make some shutters. Had to laminate it to get the proper thickness. Used epoxy and a vacuum bag.

To thickness the stuff I used a drum sander. It sands very easily. I definitely wouldn't try and plane it. It will absolutely destroy your blades. That stuff kills carbide router bits in one pass.
 

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You would probably need pcd tooling to plane that stuff. Pcd makes carbide look like plastic in terms of abrasion resistance. We had a set for making MDF parts on our moulder, each blade was several thousand dollars. Pcd is what MDF molding manufactures use.

I recently saw that Freud now offers a pcd tipped blade for pergo flooring.
 

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If it's something you need alot of you should be able to get it made. I was talking to a rep over the summer at a product showcase and he said they have a shop where they can fabricate custom mouldings. For part of his display he had a cope and stick raised panel door made from the stuff. All their literature says it can be tooled with standard carbide woodworking tools.
 

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If it's something you need alot of you should be able to get it made. I was talking to a rep over the summer at a product showcase and he said they have a shop where they can fabricate custom mouldings. For part of his display he had a cope and stick raised panel door made from the stuff. All their literature says it can be tooled with standard carbide woodworking tools.
Yeah. My yard is selling Boral shutters. Cope and stick, louvers, the whole nine.
 

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From past experience I know there's a lot of nasty stuff in fly ash and if someones sanding it, as mentioned above, make sure to wear a respirator and don't track that dust home.
 
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