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What role does technology play in your profession?

In what ways does it help you?

Are you finding yourself using your cell phone, tablet, or laptop more and more or do you avoid it all together on the job?
 

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It's used at the front end and back end of all work. Support during. Basically supports or touches everything, but not essential to actual performance of production.
 

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AmCraft Manufacturing
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Depends on what type of technology...

OFFICE: All types of technology to not only accommodate customers, but take work on the go with us. (Email on phone, text messaging pictures to customers as requested, different apps used for monitoring, etc). Tablets are used sometimes in management meetings.

SHOP: Raw material vendors produce product that is made of the latest technology to accommodate the following: "Green" materials; compacted density of materials for lighter, smaller end product; they use different processes to create materials for different functions/applications (compliance codes, temperature-sensitive, light-blocking, acoustic ratings, etc), and probably other types of technologies that I have not even realized yet.

Like Texas Wax says... it's used in and touches everything! Directly and indirectly.
 

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I use technology every day. From my phone to a laptop to the electric locator I use for directional drilling.
 

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I use it for navigation (cell phones). In the field, not very much other than cell phones. Many customers prefer paper invoices, and it is possible to email invoices via a tablet, or lap top.

In my opinion, the smart phone is too cumbersome to navigate for business purposes, and the tablet, is a schlep. Pen and paper is the way to go until I get back to the office.
 

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It is our specialty :D

Really enjoy the trend towards technology being a part of the everyday construction business. Who knows, maybe 3D printers will be able to build an entire skyscraper someday. Wouldn't that be something?
 

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I think we have to use it.
Almost have to have a smartphone these days. Hate it though. I get text and emails daily concerning projects.
Of course computers, printers, and copiers in the office.
Laser levels and laser plumb bob in the field.

When bidding a job, I go with a legal pad, 2 pens, and tape measure. Lately though, I have found myself taking a couple pictures with my phone. It helps when I go back to figure things. Mostly just to jog my memory.
 

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The Ultimate Wire Hider
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Technology helps me access the internet to download technical specs, cut sheets, equipment dimensions, etc. Also, it saves me from making a phone calls and being stuck on hold while waiting for an answer. I can send an email this morning and go on about my business and when the person on the other end finds the answer, he can respond within his own time frame.

Unlike many other people, I'm not "plugged in" to it 24/7. If there is something that requires my immediate attention, it will keep until I get an opportunity to check my messages.

So to answer the question, it plays a "utilitarian" role where it is a tool that I access as I need it. This is in comparison to others where it plays an "emergency" role in their business. If you notice, some people immediately respond to every chirp, beep, squeak, or ding-dong that comes out of their pocket as if they are a slave to their mobile device. If you don't notice anyone who does that, you're probably the one that's doing it.
 

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Both me and my customers are extremely thankful for cell/email technology. I often sell jobs over the cell phone via email without ever even talking to the HO. Life is too damn busy to be talking on the phone. Personally, my phone oriented business is a ton slower than email business.

P.S. I hope I'm never the dork in the photo above.
 

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This space for lease
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I use a Garmin for directions and answer phone calls with my nonsmart phone. If I am billing someone I use LibreOffice to write up an invoice and email it. I use the internet to research tools and materials on occasion. That's about it electronically, I don't want to spend more time in cyber space.

However, technology plays a large role in all my tools. Every one is an advancement of evolutionary design. Even my hammers.

I do think that there is a trend with many going overboard with electronics. It's a tool, if it works for you, it makes sense to do it. If it bogs you down and sucks away productivity or privacy it may not be worth it.

I've had some national companies demand that everything goes through their website, invoices, checkin, check out, signatures, on site photos in real time, etc. I tell those types to go pound sand. Nothing on the internet is private, for one. And I am not a secretary, I do not want to be a secretary and they are not going to pay me enough to hire a full time secretary.
 

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If I had enough money I'd have a CNC and it would play a big role. Other than that I use my computer for renderings, contracts and pictures. Camera to take those pictures. Cell phone to record my spending habits on the spot, to communicate with other contractors and clients.

If you think about it just about everything can be considered technology. When hand tools were the thing and you came out with a circular saw that was new technology. I have all kinds of older technology in my shop. Hell my clock receives a signal from the atomic clock transmitter to adjust itself every night at midnight. That's pretty cool technology.

My truck is full of it, everything that makes it run and the GPS I put in from a 3rd party source.
 

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Regarding texting, it's essential, yet I'm beginning to find it too disruptive. I am trying to "reset" some relationships to reduce the volume, but it's not easy.
 

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Maker of Fine Sawdust
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You are using it wrong then. A phone call is disruptive. You have to stop and talk. A text is something that you get when you have time. You don't have to look at it immediately.

Set up ring tones for the texts that you want to look at when they come in. The others you get when you have time.

I've told my family if you text me I assume it's not a priority. If you call me it will be taken as a priority. Don't text me if the house is on fire. And don't call me to tell me dinner was changed from hot dogs to spaghetti.
 

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You are using it wrong then. A phone call is disruptive. You have to stop and talk. A text is something that you get when you have time. You don't have to look at it immediately.

Set up ring tones for the texts that you want to look at when they come in. The others you get when you have time.

I've told my family if you text me I assume it's not a priority. If you call me it will be taken as a priority. Don't text me if the house is on fire. And don't call me to tell me dinner was changed from hot dogs to spaghetti.
Maybe, but it can still be too much dialog, leading to too much back and forth over little stuff. Damned if you do.....or don't.
 

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My phone company has a messaging service where people can leave voice mails and I return calls when I can without having to type with a bunch of tiny keys and waiting for a response so I can type some more. Works great. To me, texts are like notes someone leaves on your door.
 
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