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I bid an insurance fire job yesterday. It's a log cabin with a lot of soot staining. Everything that's not being replaced with new logs/carr siding is being soda blasted back to bare wood by servicemaster, then they're turning the finishing over to us.

There's over 10,000 sq ft of exposed wood that's gonna have to have a medium sanding. All the rafters are exposed logs, 2 dormers framed with logs. Ceilings & walls are all either carr siding or flat faced logs. It's all white pine, so the soda blasting is leaving the hard grain standing proud & will have to be sanded smooth to the touch, but doesn't have to be completely flat again.

I've already got 2 bosch ROS65VC-6 sanders, which will work great on the flat walls, but the rafters & other round logs. What I'm looking for, is probably a smaller 5" sander that's going to stand up to this much abuse that won't vibrate us to death on the high work.
 

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I've used the PC 5" ROS for years and have put many hours on them in a cabinet shop.Held up well.I do hear that their quality has changed lately but have not checked out the new ones.If you have air on the job you may look into the Dynabrade air sanders.You can't hurt those things but they do take some CFM to run.
 

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Holy cow Pin! That's a lot of sanding to do. I'm gonna say it...Festool. If your sanding that much, just think of the dust generated. If you want a 5" the ets125 is lightweight for working overhead. For a little more agression, the Rotex...but it will be heavy using it overhead. Get some granat paper and go to town. If you burn it up, you know Festool will back it.
 

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For the uneven surfaces you're going to do, I'd use a flap sander of some sort.... either brush backed Wolfhead,, or a Mac Mop form Klingspor.
I'd consider using a 2500 to 3500 rpm polisher, with an adapted mount.
Joe
 

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I've got 5 PC sanders----other than changing out the little rubber band speed regulator belt--all are fine---and getting old.

Porter Cable came out with a light duty one a year or so back---do not buy that one---get the heavy duty model---
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
For the uneven surfaces you're going to do, I'd use a flap sander of some sort.... either brush backed Wolfhead,, or a Mac Mop form Klingspor.
I'd consider using a 2500 to 3500 rpm polisher, with an adapted mount.
Joe

Joe, you got any sources on where to buy? That wolfhead does look promising, not just on this project, but on some of the log furniture we build in the shop.
 

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I seem to remember ther was guy on here last year that had some problems finishing after the soda blast on a cabin. You should do a search. I cant remember if it got moldy or turned green after finish but it was a problem.
 

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Pin,
Check your e-mail.

After some looking, I think I'd go with a lightweight 2500 rpm polisher, & a Wolfhead that is dedicated to a 5/8/x11 tpi shaft. You'll have to double check the polisher threads though. You need something light enough to handle, powerfull enough to do the job, & I believe the right angle polisher drive would make for a good ergonomics. I'd think a 120 would be about right to knock down the raised grain, but still leave a reasonably smoothe surface to seal up. If not, a #150 follow up might be needed. I'd think a 2" width would be about right.

Here's a model reference: http://www.gandpmachinery.com/wolfheadwheels.html#

If you look at the listings, they have some 12 brush direct mount heads that will fit a variety of threaded shafts. I'd stay with the std length brush because it's more aggressive, & the smaller diameter will be easier to handle.

Maybe this Makita polisher? http://www.amazon.com/Makita-9227C-7-Inch-Electronic-Polisher/dp/B0000223IZ/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1396832446&sr=8-2&keywords=7%22+polisher
The wrap around handle would help with comfort & control, yet it's fairly light at less than 6 lb. The shaft thread is 5/8 x 11 tpi . That's the ticket for what you need.

Joe
 

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That looks like the right tool for the job & at the price point I had in mind. This job is bid high enough to justify spending some of the profits on some new tools. Soon as I get the 100% green light that they've accepted my bid, 2 of them will be on their way.:thumbup:

Been wanting a second titan 440 sprayer, looks like I'll have it now as well.:clap:
Check the price between Rubin2 and Granat. If the Rubin2 is less expensive use it. Granat is designed to sand the modern finishes we deal with, it gives you no benefit over Rubin2 on bare wood.

Get extra bags for your extractors, the fine dust clogs the pores at about 50% of the units capacity. just throw the bags away, don't try to empty and reuse.

Tom
 

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ETS 125 in the link is a finish sander. It has a very small 2 mm stroke. It may not be the right sander for this application.

The 125 sands best with no pressure on it. With just self weight it works the best. Something you have to get used to. The ETS150-5 may be a better choice for this application. If you really want a 125 mm diameter pad, go with the RO-125, used in the random mode it is a 5 mm stroke. There may be times the Rotex mode may be helpful. There is also the RO-90. In the right hands the RAS is a great sander.

Tom
 

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FWIW, the RO125 with Rubin 2 was my first thought. Like Tom said, I always thought the ETS was more of a fine sanding machine, though I've never used it. Just used the RO125 for about 4 hours of sanding a couple weeks ago. No numbness in my hands after a quick shake out.
 

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Tom,
We use Dynabride RO,s in our shop daily, brush backed heads, hand held inline stroke, a shop converted thicknes sander for Bardo flex wheels, 7" edge sander, 36" widebelt, & 6,000lb turning sanders, just to name some. I just don't see how a RO sander is the ticket for sanding logs!

Brush backed wheels are excellent at sanding complicated profiles. They can be agressive, or as soft as you need to be, without distorting the profile, while at the same time reaching the nooks & cranies. Using a 2500 rpm right angle polisher motor would allow for a reasonable hand held technique, & Wolfhead brush head would give maximum efficiency for profile.

Just my .02
Joe
 

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Joe,

I get it, my concern would be the brushbacks getting into the soft area. I think the RO would give you more control over where the abrasive action is applied.

I have never used the Wolf head. Will it sand the higher hard grain areas without getting into the softer low areas? Also this is not a shop environment, do they makes smaller wheels than shown in the video?

Tom
 

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Tom,
Read post #11, & the attached brochure link. The brochure talks about lots of uses, including sanding raised grain.

They list a 6 1/2" head (short trim brushes) that would probably operate at about 7 1/2" dia at the slashed sandpaper edge.
 
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