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Discussion Starter #1
It would be nice to start a thread for reference concerning the different types of mortar and when and when not to use them. There are many of us me included that are not too knowlegeable in this area as those who taught us were not that knowledgeable. Thanks to the internet that can now change. I for one would like to learn.

I basically use Type N and Type S mortar thats it. I use N for applications such as brick facia and mortared patios and type S for just about everything else as the price is about the same, it finishes allright, and is arguablly stronger in structural situations. Ok laugh at my ignorance but then do me a favor and tell me what I need to know. :cheesygri So far this has worked for me without any callbacks but I def. don't want to run into a major problem down the road. For example I have a proposal written that is being considered right now for repairing the facia architectual detailing on the bank face. I don't want to know what mortar to use with the old 1920's brick.


Thanks in advance for all the replies.

Tim
 

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Luka, Without going in to great detail I will tell you that there are a lot of different factors that are involved in determining mortar uses. There is a lot of info out there if you look for it. I would answer a specific question if you post it and I know the answer.
Are you in a freeze/thaw region? If so, those 1920's brick may not work together well with a portland cement based mortar. You may need to use a lime putty mortar to allow the brick to move. Lime putty mortar is what was used before portland cement was discovered. It basically is not as hard as portland cement and allows for expansion of brick.
On a large job where a lot of joint restoration is needed. I would take some mortar samples and send them off to be tested. US Heritage out of Chicago will do this and will make up batches of lime putty mortar to match your project. It's not cheap, but neither is replacing an entire building facade.
Mason's in Europe only use lime mortar on restoration work. They have much older buildings and work very hard to preserve them and we should do the same.
 

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Do you know of any written resources with which I could edumacate myself? I have read different things in various resources I have...but mortar has pretty much been mentioned in an offhanded way.

thanks
Tim
 

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The federal government put something out a few years back that goes over restoration mortars.They only put it out after discovering the importance during the Capital restoration.
There was also a good article in JLC covering this. It was years ago but it was a good read. Search on the JLC website www.jlconline.com

There are also books that cover the subject. I think Advanced Masonry covers mortar pretty well. Don't know the author's name
 

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Somewhere in a thread on this forum, I posted a link to an article about historical mortar mixes. New system, and I can't access the link now. Look in the "tuckpointing an 1890 home thread.
JVC

Also google up the stone foundation, or their magazine stone nexus which also has some good articles about the old style mixes.
 
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