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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everybody,
I am going to bid a job today on some brickwork. The bricks are half-way up the side of the house which turns into the cedarshingle siding at that point. The weather has been cold and i am wondering what would be the best to apply to brick. Also, should my proces vary upon the neighborhood/area that i am working in? Thanks for any help on this.
Buddy Abbott
Abbott's Painting, Charlotte NC
 

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ProWallGuy said:
acrylic masonry primer for a first coat, and topcoat with any high-quality latex exterior house paint. Brush and roll on with a 1" + nap. Check weather conditions before hand, you want about 50 degrees around the clock
3-1/2 years ago I did it just the way PWG said. I power washed everything a week in advance and waited for a stretch of good weather. I applied (2) coats over the primer. Still looks as good as it did when it went on.
 

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I can't comment on the paint question but I did want to speak to your second question. IMHO, it's not a good idea to have "different prices for different neighbourhoods" - especially if you are hoping to have "word of mouth" work for you. You go giving too many different prices in your quotes and soon people won't trust your quotes/word. That doesn't mean you can't have different prices because of different variables though. For example, if you have to sand-blast before priming/painting that that would cost more. You just have to be careful if you price 2 similar jobs at drastically different prices - it could come back to bite you in the a$$.
 

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I reckon I missed the second part of the question too. I agree with Decks.
Try to keep charges on similar jobs similar. There can be upcharges for different scenarios, but generally if you are running a business, you should have a basic price list for basic jobs. If you owned a muffler shop, whether Joe Ghetto or Suzy Escalade wants a new muffler, it should be the same. Now if one of the above rolls into your shop with a 1942 3.5-ton Dodge truck, and you need to remove the whole rear-end assembly just to see the muffler, you charge differently. Does that make sense?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks again for the advice. I need to call the man building the place and make sure he knows that it may need a primer. Some of the brickwork looks very old and some is new. Should it all get the masonry primer?
 

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Grumpy, I don't know if it destroys bricks, but its really hard to go *back*.

Blabbott, I'd charge more if they're in the Ballantyne area just because they wouldn't want anything inexpensive. What would their neighbors think? :cheesygri :evil:
 

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Three months ago I painted a all brick home for a client. The home was built in the 50s'. I first pressure washed then applied a good coat of primer. Then rolled two HEAVY coats of blockfill with a 1 1/4" nap. Then two coats of a good exterior latex. The job turned out great.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
It is cold!

Here in Charlotte n.c. the weather has been below freezing at night and generally not out of the 40's during the day. What should i do about this and what to tell the owner.I know he really wants to get this place finished and sold.Thanks.
ProWallGuy said:
I generally use a block filler or acrylic masonry primer for a first coat, and topcoat with any high-quality latex exterior house paint. Brush and roll on with a 1" + nap. Check weather conditions before hand, you want about 50 degrees around the clock for this stuff to dry/cure properly.
 

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blabbott said:
the weather has been below freezing at night and generally not out of the 40's during the day. What should i do about this and what to tell the owner.I know he really wants to get this place finished and sold.Thanks.
What do you do about the weather? If there's something you can do about it you sure don't need to be painting. Tell the Owner the truth - if it's too cold to paint then tell him that. If you can cover the whole house in tarps and heat it then tell him how much more that'll cost him. Old British proverb say "you can't always get what you want, but if you try sometimes, you'll find, you get what you need". :Thumbs:
 

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No way you can paint the home in cold weather...brick is a funny animal as it will absorb and retain both heat and cold. If you paint during the day when it's 50 out but the night before was 30 the interior of the brick will "breath" the damp cold air. You apply paint to that and in 4-6 weeks it'll be layin on the ground :eek:
 

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I agree with what don said above. You could check the surface with a moisture meter, but I personally wouldn't want to take on a job like this at this time of year. Weather conditions can change overnight. I would tell the customer to wait until spring, or have him sign a waiver (make sure your lawyer has read this waiver and it will stand up in court) releasing you from any damages if/when the paint fails.

As Pipeguy said above, you could tent off sides of the house while running a heater, or something similar, but it might be against OSHA regs, and it would cost a fortune to pull off.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks for the knowledge.

I am going to have the owner sign a waiver. He is very adament about having it done. He says low to mid 40's are fine with him. I will cover myself though.
Paint on!
 

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I guess sometimes people just want to hear themselves talk. Of the (3) posts that mentioned temperature, all (3) said, in a word, 40's is too cold to paint brick. What's the response? As long as the customer signs a paper telling me to do ********************ty work that's what I'll do. It's a shame real painters have to compete with jacklegs like blabott who know even less about painting then they do about sound business practices.

This is one reason why the contracting community gets a bad name. When the paint falls off the house in the spring and the new home owner is pissed, who do you think they will figure is at fault? - the painter. Do you think the old homeowner would ever admit that he paid someone knowing the paint would come off? - hell no! He'd go down to his grave swearing that he got screwed by some unscrupulous painter.

Basically, when you agree to do something like this you're playing a role in defrauding potential buyers. The picture you paint (pardon the pun) does not reveal the true story. And the future owner will have to cough up the cost of removing the old paint as well as applying new. IMO, if you knowingly do ********************ty work you deserve to suffer whatever troubles come back to bite you.
 

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For what it is worth, I have run into many people who were selling their homes, and the majority of them I had nothing to do with. I have a business reputation to uphold. Those people are moving, they won't be back and they don't care. Their only concern is passing the inspection by the bank, and making the place look pretty-curbside view! I have to live and work here and I don't need my reputation tarnished. I have one way of doing a paint job-the right way! You may go to a lawyer and cover your butt if something goes wrong, but, if something does go wrong, what will you do? Will you canvas the neighborhood explaining to everyone what happened? I don't think so! If a job goes sour, the first thing people and other contractors want to know is who did the job. Maybe you have your back against the wall with this customer, but you have to weigh out the consequenses of your decision. When I first started out, I used to toss and turn wondering if I did everything right on a job, but I don't anymore. Brick and concrete hold the cold, and like it's been said- the surface itself is supposed to be 50 or warmer for 24 hours or longer. Do what you want to do, but, I wouldn't feel right if I didn't say anything. Good luck to you whatever decision you go with.
 

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layup said:
You may go to a lawyer and cover your butt if something goes wrong, but, if something does go wrong, what will you do? Will you canvas the neighborhood explaining to everyone what happened?
Well said. :Thumbs:
 
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