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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
To qualify for an appointment the prospect must:
  • Admit they have a problem
  • Be committed to solving the problem
  • Be able to pay for the project
  • Arrange for all decision makers to be present
  • Agree to make a decision
 

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always ask if they own the home or if they do,or they renting it out.here is the grey area: "is this a project you are just thinking about maybe doing sometime down the road or is this something you plan on doing soon?"
i choose NOT to ask that question on the phone.usually i can get an idea by the tone of their voice and the questions they ask me if they are at least serious. after that,its up to me to give them my best pitch.
example,i have someone who called today and set up an appointment for Monday. they said they are looking for something pretty good but not too expensive because they plan on selling in about 2 years. that is a bunch of BS,they say this so it creates a situation to where i automatically give them a very cheap price. i already said i will definitely not be the cheapest but i will only guarantee them that they will be happy in the end. i locked in the appointment and its time to get to work!
 

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Captain of the Titanic
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To qualify for an appointment the prospect must:
  • Admit they have a problem
  • Be committed to solving the problem
  • Be able to pay for the project
  • Arrange for all decision makers to be present
  • Agree to make a decision
Elaborate a little Mel and for the record, I'm not sure its fair to grille a call in lead to ensure they will absolutly make a Y or N decision if you meet with them though I will admit it would be a perfect world if they all would do just that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Elaborate a little Mel and for the record, I'm not sure its fair to grille a call in lead to ensure they will absolutly make a Y or N decision if you meet with them though I will admit it would be a perfect world if they all would do just that.
It’s fair to ask for a decision if that’s what they agreed to do.

I’m not going to give away an entire script but you can pick up bits and pieces of it by reading my posts.

Suppose you have been talking to the prospect on the phone for several minutes and you ask them “Will you be comfortable giving me a Yes or No answer when we meet?”

If they answer that question with a “Yes” you will hear a “cha-ching” sound in your head. Now you know you have a live one. You have a high probability of closing the deal.

If they don’t answer your question with a “Yes” they will offer information that will help you know where they stand and what issues will prevent them from buying now.

I know some of you will criticize me and say I am “high pressure”. I’m not high pressure. Before you criticize me why don’t you get up enough guts to try it first?

Here’s a fact: within the first 20 seconds of the call I say “You may be concerned that you’ll be pressured into buying something. Let me set you at ease; you’re not under any pressure because you can end the process any time you want. OK?

You see? There’s no pressure, they don’t have to set an appointment with me if they don’t want to.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
So what book are you quoting from?
It’s not from a book.

I wrote the script myself. I make changes to it as I go along.

The qualifying process is something that I learned from a sales training coach using the Sandler Sales System.

You can find some similarities with stuff from Dave Yoho. However I think Yoho teaches to use the “Yes or No” question as a closing technique at the end of the presentation. I use it at that point sometimes but I bring it up during the initial phone call also.

I don’t know if Yoho is a proponent of qualifying. I have taken some of his stuff and adapted it to the phone call.

Most of the script is influenced by Sandler. I have adapted that system to what I do and most of it is my own words.
 

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MEL -

You are the one qualifying the prospect. They are the ones that are qualifying you and your reputation before the appointment. You just have a lead.

You captured your position and attitude when you said "You see? There’s no pressure, they don’t have to set an appointment with me if they don’t want to."

They do not have to see you and you don't not have to talk to them on their schedule. - You are the one that is looking for the opportunity to present yourself and do some work. They may not need have to do the work done and they are they buyer and you are just a seller, unless you have something unique that they want or need. - that is what separates marketing from selling, which is a big step. Only an optimistic peddler expects to sell everything. In the real world of selling the real percentage is 10-20% at best and bulk mailings are only 2-3% at best for the chance to contact a person that might have a project.

In order to qualify, you need more than your schedule. The requirement for ALL people involved to be present to allow you to meet with you is absurbed and unreasonable unless you just want a quick one-night sell, which is not realistic.

Asking for a commitment immediately is also not realisting since that takes some work and you probably do not have a complete and all-encompassing proposal including options and codes requirements, which is unlikely for a one-night stand in someones home. If it is a major, designers and code officials should be included unless you a flipping a house (one of the 25%) in Detroit and hoping to flip it with guaranteed financing for any amount in advance.
 

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The best end closing technique that I have found goes something like this...

After you have gone over your product, why your the best at what you do, and why your price is what it is you follow with this.

Salesman : Mr. Homeowner, do you feel confident about the quality of materials and install we could accomplish for you?
Homeowner: Yes I understand and feel confident about everything.
Salesman : Alright good. If you have no further questions, we can get the contract signed and get you on our schedule.
Homeowner: Well, I dont feel ready to do that.
Salesman: Oh, I thought you said that you felt confident with us and that we would be the best to assist you in completing your project.

That usually trips the homeowner up a bit and helps me understand how "gung-ho" they are about starting their project or if they really want us to do it. Usually I am not even close to aggressive or being that pushy but in certain situations I find that you have to be.

A lot of time people will say they can get the job done for cheaper and most the time I ask them why they are still looking then.

You can not always be a nice guy.
 

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People love to buy, but hate to be sold.
They came to you looking to buy a roof, make it easy for them.
By nature people are resistant to salesmen, let them make the decision to buy, don"t force it.

Read Sandler again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
MEL -

You are the one qualifying the prospect. They are the ones that are qualifying you and your reputation before the appointment. You just have a lead.

You captured your position and attitude when you said "You see? There’s no pressure, they don’t have to set an appointment with me if they don’t want to."

They do not have to see you and you don't not have to talk to them on their schedule. - You are the one that is looking for the opportunity to present yourself and do some work. They may not need have to do the work done and they are they buyer and you are just a seller, unless you have something unique that they want or need. - that is what separates marketing from selling, which is a big step. Only an optimistic peddler expects to sell everything. In the real world of selling the real percentage is 10-20% at best and bulk mailings are only 2-3% at best for the chance to contact a person that might have a project.

In order to qualify, you need more than your schedule. The requirement for ALL people involved to be present to allow you to meet with you is absurbed and unreasonable unless you just want a quick one-night sell, which is not realistic.

Asking for a commitment immediately is also not realisting since that takes some work and you probably do not have a complete and all-encompassing proposal including options and codes requirements, which is unlikely for a one-night stand in someones home. If it is a major, designers and code officials should be included unless you a flipping a house (one of the 25%) in Detroit and hoping to flip it with guaranteed financing for any amount in advance.
Selling is a game. And I play the game to win.

Have you ever watched football game and the quarterback fakes a pass and then hands the ball off. Do you think there is something wrong with that? No, it’s part of the game.

The prospect can play the game the way he wants and I can play it the way I want to.

We keep score in this game by going to the bank.

A young man 21 years old recently won 8.55 million dollars in the world series of poker. He won it on a bluff with only a pair of nines.

Someone that thinks the way that you do would conclude that he should not have been allowed to win with a bluff. Or maybe he should have at least of been required to have a full house to win that much money.

I don’t gamble but way back in high school I played poker with some of my friend and I took everything that they had.

When a prospect asks me to come to their house because they need a new roof my intention is to walk out with a signed contract. Because I play to win and I keep score by going to the bank.

When the prospect tells me he only has $10,000 to work with I’m going to call his bluff and sell him a roof for $10,000 and add on gutter protection for $1500.

I’m going to play the game to win and I’m going take all that I can get. I’m not going to feel guilty about it.

I get the sense that you think there is something wrong with playing this game to win.
 

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Captain of the Titanic
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Mel, like i said, if you want to ever make a move, call me:thumbsup:.

There are times I have felt this level of forwardness can be considered pressure and I know I'm not happy when I am put in that type of situation but having said that, I also recognize my own weakness as a sales person and in this type of economy I really wish I had someone to bring the bacon home.
 

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Selling is a game. And I play the game to win.

A young man 21 years old recently won 8.55 million dollars in the world series of poker. He won it on a bluff with only a pair of nines.

Someone that thinks the way that you do would conclude that he should not have been allowed to win with a bluff. Or maybe he should have at least of been required to have a full house to win that much money.

When a prospect asks me to come to their house because they need a new roof my intention is to walk out with a signed contract. Because I play to win and I keep score by going to the bank.

When the prospect tells me he only has $10,000 to work with I’m going to call his bluff and sell him a roof for $10,000 and add on gutter protection for $1500.

I’m going to play the game to win and I’m going take all that I can get. I’m not going to feel guilty about it.

I get the sense that you think there is something wrong with playing this game to win.
First off, he won after playing hundreds of hands to get there. Likewise, a good business thrives on, day after day, doing good work at fair prices, and getting positive reviews and referrals. Pushy sales tactics are exactly the sort of thing that will ultimately lead to someone thinking they got ripped off and who will bash you anonymously on an internet review site for all to see forevermore! :w00t:

Second, While I appreciate your enthusiasm and the motivation to be successful, there's nothing in the other poster's post that could lead you to conclude he thinks you "shouldn't be successful." I simply read his comments as a very pragmatic analysis of a sales doctrine that is vague at best and (at worst) likely to lead to failure for anyone trying to implement it.

While the tactics you're espousing might have worked in 2005 when we all had more work than we could handle, that's only because the bar was really low for good salesmanship. If today you honestly run your business by trying to thrust a contract and pen into the hands of everyone you give a quote to, you're going to end up stocking shelves at Wal-Mart before long.

Guess that turned into a bit of a flame, just trying to be constructively critical.

Hugs & Kisses,
-Duck042
 

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Selling is a game. And I play the game to win.

Have you ever watched football game and the quarterback fakes a pass and then hands the ball off. Do you think there is something wrong with that? No, it’s part of the game.

The prospect can play the game the way he wants and I can play it the way I want to.

We keep score in this game by going to the bank.

A young man 21 years old recently won 8.55 million dollars in the world series of poker. He won it on a bluff with only a pair of nines.

Someone that thinks the way that you do would conclude that he should not have been allowed to win with a bluff. Or maybe he should have at least of been required to have a full house to win that much money.

I don’t gamble but way back in high school I played poker with some of my friend and I took everything that they had.

When a prospect asks me to come to their house because they need a new roof my intention is to walk out with a signed contract. Because I play to win and I keep score by going to the bank.

When the prospect tells me he only has $10,000 to work with I’m going to call his bluff and sell him a roof for $10,000 and add on gutter protection for $1500.

I’m going to play the game to win and I’m going take all that I can get. I’m not going to feel guilty about it.

I get the sense that you think there is something wrong with playing this game to win.
Well said Mr. Mel !!! i am with you on this.
 

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It really does work....TRY IT!

First off, he won after playing hundreds of hands to get there. Likewise, a good business thrives on, day after day, doing good work at fair prices, and getting positive reviews and referrals. Pushy sales tactics are exactly the sort of thing that will ultimately lead to someone thinking they got ripped off and who will bash you anonymously on an internet review site for all to see forevermore! :w00t:

Second, While I appreciate your enthusiasm and the motivation to be successful, there's nothing in the other poster's post that could lead you to conclude he thinks you "shouldn't be successful." I simply read his comments as a very pragmatic analysis of a sales doctrine that is vague at best and (at worst) likely to lead to failure for anyone trying to implement it.

While the tactics you're espousing might have worked in 2005 when we all had more work than we could handle, that's only because the bar was really low for good salesmanship. If today you honestly run your business by trying to thrust a contract and pen into the hands of everyone you give a quote to, you're going to end up stocking shelves at Wal-Mart before long.

Guess that turned into a bit of a flame, just trying to be constructively critical.

Hugs & Kisses,
-Duck042
Again, as I've mentioned in other posts, it's just the difference of what is allowable in different industries. In windows, siding, and roofing, we can put a whole "proposal" together and come up with an exact number on the spot. Why shouldn't we then ask for the business?

The industry closing rate in the window and siding industry is around 35%. These are the guys that give the estimate, wait for a call, follow-up, wait for a call.....I ONLY do one call closes. My closing rate is 65% for the entire year and I've written $1,512,813 in business. (Probably won't see me at WalMart stocking shelves anytime soon) My co-worker who does the "bid/estimate" thing is at $807,692. My customers still get a great product at the same price and phenomenol service and support. Who do you think made more money this year? (Everyone reading this IS in business to make money right?)

The important thing to remember is that a one call close is not a pressure situation. It is simply saying, "if you like EVERYTHING about my company, me, my product, my pricing, and it's affordable then I have EVERYTHING you are looking for. Let's do business. If there is ANYTHING you DON'T like then let's not beat around the bush. You don't have to spare my feelings. Let's just decided we're not a perfect fit and tell me NO. I can devote time to others that have a need and you can find the right fit for you."

A pressure sale is when the homeowner says NO....then the guy stands in the shower until the homeowner signs a contract (a true story relayed to me by the homeowner. She maced him and called the police--and yes I closed that one on the spot...no mace needed).

When a homeowner tells me NO then I'll ask what they felt wasn't perfect for them. If I can address it great. If I can't I leave. No pressure.

You have to ASK for the business SOMETIME. (Everyone is asking right?) You might as well do that while the info is fresh, people are excited, and you're all there together.

If this doesn't work for your business...great. Read and move on. If it's interesting and you'd like to learn how to apply it to your business it can probably get you an extra job or two. Looks like there are some very successful guys and gals that do it so ask and learn.
 

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Diamond,

Totally valid point about this being an industry-specific tactic, and there are probably factors with your situation that allow you to do "one call closes" like the price you're bidding the job out at, the level of competition where you are, the demand for the work, etc. In any case, congrats on the sales figures, I hope you got a good commission on that! :thumbsup:

I can tell you that for a job with a lot of moving parts in a down economy and in a state like AZ that had massive overbuilding (such as a kitchen remodel with new cabinets, flooring, appliances, etc.), there's no way you could reasonably expect someone who is about to spend $50k or more to commit to going with you on the first meeting, without talking to their spouse, or without getting other bids. Even repeat customers need help understanding a complex job.

Besides, I don't have a big two-page ad in the Yellow Pages for "AAAA111++++ Remodeling" that relies more on volume than good word-of-mouth referrals. The last thing I'd want is for someone to feel buyer's remorse because they were pushed into something they didn't have time to consider and do because they wanted to, not because a salesman was staring at them. They'd trash me to their friends and I'D be stocking those Walmart shelves! :shutup:

That said, be honest about what the tactic seeks to accomplish. While you may not be standing in the lady's shower making her sign a contract (hilarious, btw :laughing:), the whole point of this tactic is to implicitly pressure the homeowner to sign a contract on the spot without giving them time to get other bids and/or try to negotiate the price down.
 

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A pressure sale is when the homeowner says NO....then the guy stands in the shower until the homeowner signs a contract (a true story relayed to me by the homeowner. She maced him and called the police--and yes I closed that one on the spot...no mace needed).

Sure, you knew they were out of mace and couldn't defend themselves any longer. :>)

Just kidding, but this always seems to turn into a contentious debate when we discuss sales techniques. I will try to not land on one side or the other in this one.

I just want to say I don't like the poker game analogy at all. Poker has winners and losers. The winner is all happy happy and reports to the bank while the loser walks away with nothing, possibly left to bum lunch of a friend.

In our game it is increasingly important for all parties to an agreement to be winners. We're not out to sell a job and leave the homeowner in smoking ruins. Rather that we set out to assist them in claiming their prize, which is a good job well done. Win win selling is always the best but doesn't work well at the poker table.

Again, no sides, hugs & kisses.

Good Luck
Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Some of you guys act like you’re more afraid of selling something than the prospect is of buying it.
 

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Some of you guys act like you’re more afraid of selling something than the prospect is of buying it.
Ah, you have much to learn, young Padwan.

I believe Benjamin Franklin once said "It is better to have a happy customer who understands the deal than it is to have the failings of the contract you pushed upon him and wrote with an 11th-grade education exposed before an Administrative Law Judge and the Registrar of Contractors." Ok, maybe that was me... :thumbup:
 
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