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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was asked to replace the round top windows in this picture. There are three of them, all in similar condition. The homeowner filed a claim with insurance after a hailstorm, and when the contractor demoed the walls for the new windows, this is what they found.

The homeowner tells me the contractor bailed out at this point, because the new windows were to big for him to install. They are 6' wide, & 9 feet tall. The new windows are a one piece picture window and are supposedly 600lbs each.

The homeowner believes the existing mulled windows caused the water damage. Hence the one piece replacements.

I am just wondering if the stucco is the cause of the water problems, and if they should start investigating around the rest of the house.

I passed on the job, btw.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
The picture doesn't show as much as I had hoped. The osb is soft enough to poke your finger through, with water damage showing on the framing from the inside. (The drywall has been removed)
 

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Would have to have better pictures, but doubt the actual mull of the windows caused that much damage. I would say either bad window installation or stucco/water proofing wrong.
 

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Is that Fypon around the windows?
I would like to see a close up of where that meets the windows above and below the Fypon(?)
 

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THe IRon Piñata
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The problem with stucco is it looks good but once house settles it cracks up high an water gets behind it an rots corners of the house. The top of Fireplace is a good place to check first. If it's on front I bet it's all over house it's a big mess to fix all that maybe insurance will cover damages idk. It's called fucco around here for that reason. Needs an inspection ASAP. Never buy stucco. Poor guy.
 

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Superseal could provide you with good info here. I think he had some issue like this on "the hurd job" thread.
 

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It is up to you but why would you pass on this job?

A proper scaffold setup would have you completing this in no time.

Stucco leaks not because of cracks but because it is stucco. That is why a drainage plain (paper/Tyvek) is required behind it. The drainage plain (or lack of it) is most likely the problem.

Andy.
 

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THe IRon Piñata
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Stucco leaks from cracks above. Most homes not all have a thin layer of concrete, styrofoam backer wire mesh nailed to the ply some have felt others tyvek. So water will find a way but it's not gonna penetrate all those layers to rot wood that high. It's getting in from the highest part of the stucco an stucco does crack. True stucco is really thick doesn't have all those cheap products behind it. The outside corners an where two roofs meet, chimney an some windows will have Rot.It's not rocket science get u a job where u tear it all off an u will have extensive wood rot on various parts of the home. Brick usually sits 1/2 to 3/4 off a house stucco sits on the ply exterior. Water can't escape or dry stucco is crap.
 

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Stucco leaks from cracks above. Most homes not all have a thin layer of concrete, styrofoam backer wire mesh nailed to the ply some have felt others tyvek. So water will find a way but it's not gonna penetrate all those layers to rot wood that high. It's getting in from the highest part of the stucco an stucco does crack. True stucco is really thick doesn't have all those cheap products behind it. The outside corners an where two roofs meet, chimney an some windows will have Rot.It's not rocket science get u a job where u tear it all off an u will have extensive wood rot on various parts of the home. Brick usually sits 1/2 to 3/4 off a house stucco sits on the ply exterior. Water can't escape or dry stucco is crap.
uhhh.....



....OK.
 

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Stucco leaks from cracks above. Most homes not all have a thin layer of concrete, styrofoam backer wire mesh nailed to the ply some have felt others tyvek. So water will find a way but it's not gonna penetrate all those layers to rot wood that high. It's getting in from the highest part of the stucco an stucco does crack. True stucco is really thick doesn't have all those cheap products behind it. The outside corners an where two roofs meet, chimney an some windows will have Rot.It's not rocket science get u a job where u tear it all off an u will have extensive wood rot on various parts of the home. Brick usually sits 1/2 to 3/4 off a house stucco sits on the ply exterior. Water can't escape or dry stucco is crap.
If your having those problems then it has been applied wrong somehow. Stucco is the siding around here. As with any other product, when installed correctly there should be no problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Not sure if it was Fypon or not, but that would be a reasonable assumption. I am not going back so won't be able to verify.

There are plenty of stucco homes around that are doing just fine. I don't buy into the assertion that all stucco/eifs is inherently bad.

This house was built in 1997, when there were a lot of eifs/stucco problems caused by incompetent installers.

I had just never seen one this bad up close before. It's a $1.4 Mil dollar home, in an area where that is very rare. You would have thought the builder would have gotten that part right.

I didn't pass on the job because of the size of the windows. I passsed because the HO only wanted to get his windows installed. Which to me is the least of his problems. I did not want to own an install over mushy osb, without any future regard to a plan for a drainage plane. I encouraged the HO to recruit a competent GC, and/or a good stucco company. I don't know what he chose to do.
 

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THe IRon Piñata
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If your having those problems then it has been applied wrong somehow. Stucco is the siding around here. As with any other product, when installed correctly there should be no problems.
Georgia weather during the summer months is humid. Arizona in dry desert heat stucco does great. Two different regions; different climates ; different outcomes.
 

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We have huge problems with EIFS and Monolithic claddings on houses built in the 90s over here, brought on a major overhaul on the code in regard to those products they all have to be installed over drained and vented cavity's now IMO the only safe way to get the stucco look is to have it over block or brick.
 

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Good call on turning that job down. It would have been a headache for you that brain surgery couldn't get rid of :laughing:. The mull on the windows had nothing to do with the rot. The EIFS did. EIFS+residential+moisture=Exactly what you see. It IS improper installation, as EIFS wasn't designed to be used in residential applications with wood windows/doors/trim touching it. The problem becomes worse in high moisture areas of the country. It works OK in dry climates, but it's a disaster in wet ones. Thousands upon thousands of homes built here in the south are literally falling down due to all the moisture intrusion around the windows. The moisture can get in, but it can't get out. Real stucco breathes, EIFS does not. I've turned down many window replacement jobs, just like yours, over the years because the windows aren't defective, the whole process is flawed. There have been thousands of lawsuits filed against Dryvit because they said it was fine for residential use. Now they say it has to have a 1/4" gap between the 'stucco' and trim that needs to be filled with Butyl caulk.
 

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Georgia weather during the summer months is humid. Arizona in dry desert heat stucco does great. Two different regions; different climates ; different outcomes.
No matter. When installed correctly for your geographical location stucco will be fine. As long as all involved are educated on the installation, care, and precautions traditional stucco will do fine.

EIFS is a bit of a different story but once again for the most part correctly installing the product will yield the best results.
 
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