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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ive recently started my own masonry business and have been doing a few chimneys. I have worked with two different masonry companies both of them used different morters for between the flue tiles and I am curious as to which one I should use.. I thought using the fire clay method would be the most responsilbe method until I washed my hands at the end of the day and noticed that the stuff was easily soluable in water. I figured the company that used portland cement was simply to lazy to use fire clay but now Im starting to wonder. Flue tiles are exposed to moisture I cant go back to using fire clay....
It would be great if I could simply use a caulking gun and put a bead of some sort of heat resistant glue on these flues.

Any ideas?
 

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Chief outhouse engineer
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Rutland puts referactory cement in a caulk tube and it comes out about perfect for applying to flue liners. Yes it is water soluable which comes in very handy when building the fire box as you can clean it up with a sponge.

All the refractory cements are water soluable as far as I know. The silica is what gives it the heat resistance that portland does not have. 2000 plus degrees for refractory cement, 600 for typical type N mortar.

Installing a cap on the liner above the wash will keep moisture out as well as birds and small animals. :thumbsup:
 

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The only thing I will EVER set flues in is Heatstop II. Non-water soluable when cured, but can still be washed like Alsey, or any pre-mix. I've seen far too many washed out joints in flues to use anything else. As a matter of fact, I've seen alot of chimneys that leak out through the veneer, even one we fixed that leaked fire (with a wood shake roof) out through the chimney! The only downsides with the Heatstop II are the fact you have to mix it for each flue, & it's gray, & doesn't always look as nice as Alsey with firebrick.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks

Thanks for your responses. I guess nothings perfect. I was simply worried what condensation inside the chimney would do to water soluable fire clay. Ive helped take down many chimneys and quite a few of them have good solid caps yet these chimneys are just as rotten on the inside as the outside I can only think its condensation.
Does anybody install weepers for air circualtion when they construct a chimney?
 

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Chief outhouse engineer
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once refractory cement sets up it is no longer easily washed off. After the first fire, it will not dissolve until it is removed by taking the chimney apart. Read the label, it is all you need to know. Domestic and rutland are common in the midwest.
 
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