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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello ,
I am a newer site work company. I know times are tough right now. I spent the money on the yellow book and I don't think I have gotten 2 call this year. I am looking for advice on setting up a web site, are they worth the money ? any input would be great ! Thanks:thumbsup:
 

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semi-skilled laborer
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You cant go wrong with a good website. The internet is the Yellow Pages of this generation. People are starting to use Google and other search engines instead of a phone book. It is easier to find just what you are looking for and a company's website will give you alot more information about it's products or services then a business card sized ad in the Yellow Pages will.
 

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bathroom guru
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I needed a website a couple of years ago and after a little searching found a guy who did my site (18+ pages), including 1 years hosting, for $250.00. I now pay $120.00 a year for hosting and he adds pages, does minor changes no charge.

It may not be the flashiest website going, but, I think I got a pretty good "bang for the buck"

www.jarvisdesignbuild.ca
 

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1. Don't build a webiste without having a purpose in mind first. Don't be on the web to just be on the web.
2. Know how to differentiate yourself from your competitors and exploit it.
3. Use Google analytics to measure your sites progress.
4. Use SEO techniques to optimize your rankings.
contact me at [email protected] and I'll send you some good websites.
 

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Two thoughts:

1. Websites are impressive when you have a strong portfolio of jobs. I love to see client lists/ jobs and pics - even if you just do site work. But if you're using for a B2B site, it might not work as well as you think if you're new to the game.

2. Now if you do residential, make it personable. Have a clean pic of yourself, your work fam, and your real fam (if you're married, whatever). Write about how passionate you are about quality, efficiency, and keeping your client's best interest as a top priority.

A website works only if you execute it well and then promote the hell out of it.
 

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I owned my own electrical contracting business that did well. I used postcards and the newspaper. Then I found a company to provide referrals. I only got charged 10% if the lead resulted in a sale.

I have had the good luck with a combo of newspaper ads under "Home Services" and my web address when I had my contracting business. You can also find companies who will provide referrals on and offline (as mentioned above) with no costs, they use a marketing plan and send out emails/flyers and all kinds of marketing materials for your company and only get a referral fee when the lead they gave you results in a sale. I personally like this the best for residential service work. As far as the postcards go, you want to use New Homeowner Marketing leads if you don't mind paying for it! Yes -- You get what you pay for! But in my case they were well worth it...I had my calls jump up allot. The key in my opionion is getting fresh leads that are new move-ins (not new homes) people who just move into a home. They are the ones looking for a lot of work. I have tested ads that really work well for me. That is how I make my living now. I hope this helps.
 

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The posts by speakeasy and jarvis (#3 and 4 above) show the diversity of pricing and scope on web sites. I personally agree with speakeasy that an effective web site for a small business is going to require a $3k to $5k investment. The $500 sites usually equate to little more than a $500 hole in your bank account. Sure you get a site, it may even look good, but no one in their right mind can help you succeed at those kinds of rates.

There are some other excellent points made above too. The point about people not using the phone book any more is absolutely true. Not being online these days is a death sentence waiting to happen. Don't expect the web site to just work magic though (refer to Copper Nerd and ManBearPig posts). You must do your other marketing right. If it means scaling back on the site design so you can afford a targeted mailing list, then scale back and step your site up later.

One key to a successful site is to find out in advance what your customers will need from your site and then provide it. If you can do that, you will have done what very few site owners accomplish. Most try to sell their services rather than serve their visitors/customers.
 
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