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hack of all trades
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just pulled out a window on a wall that had another unpatched hole in the siding. Now I'm trying to replace the siding, covering the old window space. Its a serious pain in my azz! I mostly do carpentry based "handyman" work but I've never done any siding. Does anyone have tips on the butt joint between 2 pieces on the same course? This is where I'm having most trouble. And some of the top/bottom fins that lock together have been bent in my frustration. This is on my house, I would probably not be winging this for a paying client!

Roof Siding Wall Property Brickwork
 

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Oh man what a PITA. I've never seen any good "weave" job on aluminum siding. It just isn't flexible like vinyl where you can manipulate it into place as you need to. The problem as you've found when trying to maneuver aluminum, is you bend it. And once bent, it's bent and doesn't flex back in place.

In my opinion, you need to get it to the point where you've got all of the shorter pieces above and to the left (where the window came out) and you've only got full courses still on the wall. Then just start building back into the siding that's there just as if you were siding the wall from the beginning.

Then you're not trying to "weave" siding into place, but rather than simply installing the siding as you would from the beginning. Maybe this will help....
 

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hack of all trades
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah that's probably it. Now that I'm not enraged, covered in aluminum chalky corrosion, and being raped by mosquitoes, I may be able to bring more finesse to the situation.
 

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I'd probably tear and salvage all the siding to just below the window opening. Literally start from there and use the new siding after the old was used up. If you are careful you can replicate the "factory" edge and notches on the old siding that was cut square at the ends. Sharp tin snips (right and left cut) and utility knife/straight edge.
 

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hack of all trades
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I took down all the siding on the back of the house so I have extra. I rebuilt that back wall and re sheathed it, then I'm doing it in fiber cement. I guess copying the factory edge joints would be the right thing to do. Thanks.
 

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If you have salvaged siding making factory cuts hopefully will be an action of last resort.

Doing carpentry and handy man type work ... Not a terrible thing to have a growing understand of to do.
 

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You can step piece it back in too. If it were a single piece or if you get to a single course not worth removing, slice off the bottom half of the panel and nail it to the wall. Then take your new piece and cut off the lock. It should measure almost 8.5" that extra 1/2" can be snugged up under the lock above.

Easy showed than explained. Hope your being paid correctly.
 

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Real shame the brick got covered up with siding. Like others have said tear it down to window and start over. cutting factories is pretty easy to do if you need to. If this stuff has the backer glued to it can put it loose when doing the factories.
 

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hack of all trades
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I copied the factory overlap cut and was able to weave a piece in pretty easily. After some time messing with it its easier to see understand how the stock material goes together and bend things back that were damaged in my sloppier removal. That brick pattern fiberboard is horrible. When I took the stuff off the back it left fibers burning my arms for days.
 
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