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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I work in a northern state where it can get very cold and windy. We do siding and window installs all year round. The issue I am having is when its okay to postpone a job due to weather. In my opinion, and back in the day, nothing stopped a job, you throw on extra layers and keep going. However things are not like that anymore.
I want to come up with some sort of SOP that says, if its -10 wind-chill we postpone. But then I will have guys scouring every weather app out there until they find it, or they watch the weather all day and leave the second it hits -10, so I am not sure that setting a temperature like that is the best option.
We also have considered having the guys go out to the job no matter what and if its too bad they can go home and get paid 1-2 hours for their travels and trouble. But how do you regulate that? And is 1 hour of taxed pay enough to get them out there to assess?
I should mention my installers are employees not subs.
Anyone else deal with these issues have any suggestions?
 

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When we schedule around weather, we consider what our tolerable precipitation is in terms of inch per hour. Then we consider the probability forecasted for that precipitation during our working day, and if possible, down to the hours during our work day.

We then determine if it's worth our time to pay for the potential production we can accomplish in that environment.

We do not have a hard SOP about it. Sometimes we save inside framing work for inclement weather, such as punch out and basement build outs.

If I was just going by temperature, I'd consider what the forecast was for the entire work day, and determine if, 4-6 hours for example, would be within our "acceptable working criteria", and then go from there.

2 hours of cold weather below my threshold would not stop me from giving the day a go, so to speak.

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
When we schedule around weather, we consider what our tolerable precipitation is in terms of inch per hour. Then we consider the probability forecasted for that precipitation during our working day, and if possible, down to the hours during our work day.

We then determine if it's worth our time to pay for the potential production we can accomplish in that environment.

We do not have a hard SOP about it. Sometimes we save inside framing work for inclement weather, such as punch out and basement build outs.

If I was just going by temperature, I'd consider what the forecast was for the entire work day, and determine if, 4-6 hours for example, would be within our "acceptable working criteria", and then go from there.

2 hours of cold weather below my threshold would not stop me from giving the day a go, so to speak.

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Thanks that helps give me some direction for sure!
 

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IMO it depends on a few different factors. If there is going to be one brutal day and then warm up I would consider calling it. If there is nothing but cold and wind in the forecast I still need to make money.

I wouldn't put anything a SOP as each situation is different. I remember framing a house on a really tough winter and my lead and I were trimming garage doors in -7 temp with negative 35 wind chill. Didn't matter as it wouldn't stop snowing and no end in sight for the cold. We were actually laughing as we worked, just stupid.

One thing I find very useful is keeping materials warm as possible before install. Vinyl siding/window can be tough anything much below freezing. Can also be tough having a customers house open in single digits.
 

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Whoever us responsible for the production makes the call, IMO.

Obviously, the gear for working with -35 wind chill isn't necessarily the same as working at +10. If you never work in really adverse weather, nobody is going to get the gear to do it.
 

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Cold I work, wet I work. Cold and wet, I stay home.

What constitutes cold and wet depends on my mood.

I've done vinyl in 18 degree weather. Took twice as much J, as it cracked half the time.

I was a sub then. Now, we would bag it, as very little production gets done.

That being said, I've sided during rain storms, and yep, we just soldiered on and laughed the whole time.

Once the crack of your A$$ is wet, it doesn't matter anymore.

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I take a lot of pride in working with the boys right straight through some nasty sh!t man... Weather changes so fast here in Michigan that I almost never call the day off ahead of time. It's got to be a consistently brutal forecast for the day to do that. We almost always at least get started. Good to have a couple of indoor jobs floating around on standby when this happens, but obviously it doesn't always work out like that.

I've provided all the guys with the proper serious gear you need to be safe and comfortable in a range of weather, so we always at least give it a go. There have been days where we've worked 90 minutes, cracked a bunch of material, couldn't get the tools to work properly in the cold, etc, then called it. Buy the boys breakfast and send em home. Another day this past July, I came back from a supply run to find my entire crew wandering around like zombies because it was 95 plus degrees, with direct sun on our entire work site, some of which was on a roof. I could tell they were beat and we had reached the point of diminishing returns
Could have easily cracked the whip and squeezed another two hours out of them, but at what cost? . Sent em home. It's just a judgment call, day by day.
 

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I'm in Ontario... We get -30C ( I think about -20F) to +35C (up around 90+) or more. All depends on what stage the job is at and how much it will slow things down. We always break tools more in the cold but can usually find a way to make it work.

I don't think I've ever called a day off for low or high temperature. Most of our off days due to weather are for extreme precipitation or moderate to heavy freezing rain or snow when we are framing roofs.

Depends on the crew lead, if he's a big puss the crew will follow.

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Damm that’s cold

In all fairness my full time job is working for the railroad so they don’t care about the weather, it’s a 24/7 365 day a year operation so I know what it’s like working in that crap

There is no better feeling than hanging on a metal train car coated in snow and ice, going down the tracks at 10 mph when it’s 0 degrees


David
 

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Back in the day, we would pretty much frame in whatever weather. Once I became the boss, and production hurt my wallet. we had a 10 degree rule. Occasionally, we would bend a bit on that if there was no precip. Nowadays, I will just stay home if it isn't getting to at least 20.
 

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Back in the day, we would pretty much frame in whatever weather. Once I became the boss, and production hurt my wallet. we had a 10 degree rule. Occasionally, we would bend a bit on that if there was no precip. Nowadays, I will just stay home if it isn't getting to at least 20.
Yes production in any trade falls off the cliff when the weather sucks


David
 

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Back in the day, we would pretty much frame in whatever weather. Once I became the boss, and production hurt my wallet. we had a 10 degree rule. Occasionally, we would bend a bit on that if there was no precip. Nowadays, I will just stay home if it isn't getting to at least 20.
Upper teens is my limit, any lower and I can’t keep my fingers warm for very long to work.
 

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Brickies in general are spoiled temp wise you need 25 degrees f and rising to work out of doors with warm materials and mortar.....

but As owner or foremen I'm out of doors building / repairing the shelters needed for winter masonry..

For me, learning how to make money in the winter makes working in the other 3 seasons child's play.

WInd direction and speed data is far better then even 10 year ago in most areas thanks to all the silly wind mills.... build the windward wall first during average and below average wind days/hours

Have a hard number the whole crew knows that they are expect4ed to work in ....

Have NOGO time in the morning when you phone tree the workers with your decision to work or not.

Everyone can increase the tolerance through acclimatization, but there is different body types and actually race based differences in extreme temperature resistance, The bony will need more, better gear then the mildly round ones.

Hot lunches make the winter go much better.

Don't wear your gear riding to work in the warm truck, TAKE it off, put it on at the site.

Have a heated job shack/trailer. Keep your materials covered/ ice free.

I'd rather build a shack at 10 degrees dry or snowy, then at 30 degrees and slushy.....

Gore Tex and its Chinese friends are the construction worker best friend in the winter.IMHO

Make sure employees and company vehicles have good tires, working window washers and emergency gear in all vehicles used at work and to and from home.

Have a PLAN for surprise blizzards ICED roads, at the job site, motel hotel, neighbors, to stay with if needed.

Wind speed wise OSHA already has some pretty hard limits in place year around.....
 
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