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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I saw in the directions of my tile saw that they recommend placing the water pump in a 5 gal bucket of clean water rather than in the water tray.

I've never seen anyone put the pump in clean water. I'm sure that it's much better for the pump, but are any of you guys doing that and is it even worth the hassle. I mean the pump would eventually fill your tray to overflowing.

Also, it's interesting that the hose on my saw is so short that the pump only really reaches the tray it wouldn't reach the bottom of a 5 gal bucket so it's like they don't even intend for me to follow their advice of using clean water.

Is there anyone that could take a guess at the life expectancy of running a good quality pump in dirty tile water vs clean water? I thought tile water pumps where made to handle dirty water.
 

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Carpe Diem
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I've never had to replace a pump. I once was crazy and did the fresh water bucket thing. Then I realized it's a tool and I now treat my saw like one. For as much tile as I install, I'm not saving anything by all the extra work the clean bucket thing costs me in time. If a pump goes, $35 dollars for a new one and back into the dirty water, you b!tch.
 

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The only time i do this is when it's winter and the water freezes solid in the tray. I put a heater into a 5 gallon bucket and put my pump in their with it. I then put the bucket under the tray and let the water run from the tray back into the bucket. This way i never have an issue with frozen water and it keeps my hands warm too as im cutting. Watch them bucket heaters though as they will boil the water. I put mine on a time and have it turn on and off at different times.
 

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I've never had to replace a pump. I once was crazy and did the fresh water bucket thing. Then I realized it's a tool and I now treat my saw like one. For as much tile as I install, I'm not saving anything by all the extra work the clean bucket thing costs me in time. If a pump goes, $35 dollars for a new one and back into the dirty water, you b!tch.
Same here, never replaced one. If it won't move first thing in the morning I shove a small screwdriver through the grate and start the impeller moving.
 

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Carpe Diem
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I clean the pump as well as I can when shutting down for the day. I have sprayed some WD40 on the propeller shaft before. Just don't go too crazy so you won't have oily water spraying down your tile the next time you use it.
 

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I extended the hose and added a valve to control water flow. It greatly reduces overspray.

I'm a bucket guy. I try not to use my wetsaw too much so I don't want a tray full of water to deal with at the end of the day. Also, by using valve, it reduces tray water.

I've replaced a pump. Like anything, it happens at the worst time.
 

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Paul
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Depends on which saw I'm using. My rail saw I just use the tray. My cart saw I do the bucket thing. Better water capacity, pump stays clean, and easier cleanup. The main reason is, due to over spray and evaporation, I have to add water several times a day if I use the tray but with the bucket I rarely do. Like Gary said - the pump never goes out at a good time.
 

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This is a little off topic and I don't use a wet saw much but I love to run this little $75 dollar special with bucket.

Little saw.jpg

It keeps the reservoir full and I like having running water to clean off the deck.

Little saw too.jpg

The overflow settles out in the mud pan and trickles back in the pail. I keep a grate in the bottom of the bucket for the pump to sit on. Easy clean-up this way.

Great little rig with right blades.:laughing::laughing::laughing:

__________
Mike
 

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JackP23 said:
This is a little off topic and I don't use a wet saw much but I love to run this little $75 dollar special with bucket. It keeps the reservoir full and I like having running water to clean off the deck. The overflow settles out in the mud pan and trickles back in the pail. I keep a grate in the bottom of the bucket for the pump to sit on. Easy clean-up this way. Great little rig with right blades.:laughing::laughing::laughing: __________ Mike
How do you find that little saw. I have seen that for sale for $50-$300 and always wondered if it was any good.
 

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How do you find that little saw. I have seen that for sale for $50-$300 and always wondered if it was any good.
Got it at Contractors Direct. It has it's limitations but it's pretty smart how it's designed.

I use an alpha and a cyclone with it. Not a production saw by any means but if you're snappin it doesn't matter. Super cool for backsplashes. Hell for 75 bucks.....

Like all those table top saws, it puts a little water out, but I definitely can set it up indoors.

It's got a lot goin for it. I've never tried the briccolina......that one interests me too.

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Mike
 

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This is a little off topic and I don't use a wet saw much but I love to run this little $75 dollar special with bucket.

View attachment 114021

It keeps the reservoir full and I like having running water to clean off the deck.

View attachment 114022

The overflow settles out in the mud pan and trickles back in the pail. I keep a grate in the bottom of the bucket for the pump to sit on. Easy clean-up this way.

Great little rig with right blades.:laughing::laughing::laughing:

__________
Mike
I had that same saw set up the same way, Over the years the fence became a problem and rust on the base. I now have a Rigid one which I like better $125 I think, set up the same way.
Did you add the pump?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks for the replies. :thumbsup: I didn't think dirty water was that big a deal, but I think I'll at least run some fresh water through the pump before packing it up.
 

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I had that same saw set up the same way, Over the years the fence became a problem and rust on the base. I now have a Rigid one which I like better $125 I think, set up the same way.
Did you add the pump?
I just got a small one. Don't think I'll use this saw enough to rust it. :laughing::laughing::laughing:
 

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its the chips they get em, and the fine stuff which wears it out over time. But if your worried about chips, just wrap your pump in one layer of panty hose. :clap:
The silkier ones are a finer mesh than the fishnet obviously. :eek:
 

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In the time since this thread started, I've converted to using a bucket exclusively. We had a cutting booth set up to cut and bullnose a bunch of travertine, and I'm convinced that less stone dust ended up in the air and potentially in my lungs and around the shop or site, when using a bucket of clean water. Whoever's cutting wears a 3M 7500-type respirator in the booth so the dust isn't getting breathed, but it still keeps things cleaner. We changed the plastic curtains a couple times and they stayed clearer after switching to the bucket.

The whole setup worked better for me.
 

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I have those respirators, comfortable, not sure they remove 100% of the dust though, the prefilters help. The cartridges I use I think are 3100 for organic chemicals,
So we're cutting engineered hardwood outside and have the blower going to avoid breathing formaldehyde and whatever other chemical is injected, and we allowed the granite installer to work, so he's cutting the outlets out of the backsplash, no mask or anything. I said, I don't think that's good to breathe, he says I've been doing this since 16 and I'm 37 now, I don't think it's bad for you!
Well I don't know for a fact what the concoction of minerals or the consistency almost light as air mixing in the lungs will do, I installed granite tops at a radiologists home and was wearing the respirator and he said its good I'm wearing it because it doesn't take a lot to effect the lungs, I guess he's seen firsthand what silica/dust from masonry etc. Will do. So along with keeping blade cooler and keeping dust down I'm all for it, though I would prefer vacuum attachments for the dust and not the water/slurry mess, and wiping off the water for the tile to stick to thinset.
 
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