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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I spend a fair amount of time on this forum but a different trade.

Hot water heater died this weekend while we were gone for about six hours. Came home to a real mess. Heartco engineered hardwood glued to slab in hall and entry, no doubt need replacement. Two other rooms with wood connected to these have minor damage. Carpet soaked in several bedrooms. Hardwood is all one big giant piece with ever room connected to each other. Some shoe molding and baseboards damaged?



1. Does all the hardwood need to be replaced? (if so why)

2. If part, would sections not directly damaged need to be refinished?

3. Does the order of wood & carpet replacement matter?


I would appreciate all the help you can give. I don't want to get short changed from my insurance carrier.

Also any tips on what floor system to go back over a slab.

Thanks
 

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You didn't mention what the wood condition looks like. Is it delaminating? Warping? Coming unglued from the slab?

If the water spill/flood just happened less then 48 hrs ago, let it dry out first. If there isnt any visible damage yet see what happens. After the liquid is immediately removed, wait a few weeks - until the moisture itself evaporates.
Then you will be able to see what the extent of the issues will be and how far throughout flooring they run. Fans & dehumidifiers will help.

The floor and slab need to dry out. If it is slightly cupped, often it may go back down somewhat when it drys.

Sometimes its not as bad as the first painful reaction to seeing water all over your beautiful floor.

Engi flooring is a bit more forgiving then solid, so you have that in your favor, but it is still prone to moisture issues.
 

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I work for a restoration company, and see this stuff more and more than enough! First off, call your insurance company, pay the deductible, and go from there! WITH-OUT looking at it, it needs to be dried asap, for the wood. The carpet/padding needs to be pulled, for padding does not dry if it is soaked. The wood "might' stay, lay flat, if it is dried quickly, with the proper equipment put into use! A fan blowing over the floor will not do it!!! We have equipment that will "suck/pull" the moisture out, for lack of words. The area needs de-humidifiers for dying as well, to work, and bring things back to normal. THE MAJOR issue that will happen, if not tended to properly, is MOLD, EVERY house has it, don't be alarmed, and it will start to grow, with-in 24-36 hours pending the area. That will give you the hazard, and the smell as well, that you don't want!
Please do the correct thing, safety first for the Family, and by all means, this info is just my thoughts on what to do, and just my recommendations, with the knowledge that I have learned!
 

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And may I add one more thing, see/if you call your insurance company, talk to the adjuster, do they have a company that is in good standing with them, work with them, and go from there! NOT all companies are! Some are good, some are bad!

We would be on the road in less than a hour, BUT A LONG DRIVE!!!! LOL
Let me know if I can help!
 

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engineered flooring will not lay flat once cupped..ever...

it is not a solid.. for reference see a sheet of warped plywood




That makes sense if the entire plank is soaked through down to the subfloor and the plywood, or mdf, underside/core warps

However, if only the veneered harwood gets wet on top and cupps, and the plywood underside doesnt warp, it certainly can lay flat(er) again.

Granted, as in any cupped gloor, ir rarely looks perfect again, but if it's a thick enough veneer, it could require just a sanding once it settles down.
 

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That makes sense if the entire plank is soaked through down to the subfloor and the plywood, or mdf, underside/core warps

However, if only the veneered harwood gets wet on top and cupps, and the plywood underside doesnt warp, it certainly can lay flat(er) again.

Granted, as in any cupped gloor, ir rarely looks perfect again, but if it's a thick enough veneer, it could require just a sanding once it settles down.
For the top layer to Cup the whole plank has to Cup otherwise it is delamination. It's a ply. Glued 1to the other. 1 cups the next cups. Or it has separated.
 

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As Dave said it is EXTREMELY important to get a restoration company in to run commercial dehumidifiers and fans to draw the moisture up and out . They will let it run for several days until they test for R.H. levels. This is the first step to take and could cost several thousand dollars, and most insurance companies will work directly with the restoration companies. I'm assuming you already took up all the affected carpeting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yes, they were out three days ago just hours after discovery. The best part is that they do work directly with my insurance carrier and bill directly to them.
 

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For the top layer to Cup the whole plank has to Cup otherwise it is delamination. It's a ply. Glued 1to the other. 1 cups the next cups. Or it has separated.
Sorry, Not always.

I have seen edges slightly swell and raise. The plank wasnt 'warped' and there wasn't delamination. It got better about a month later.

Okay, perhaps 'cupping' wasnt the right word, as the entite plank wasnt curved in that situation.

IF the ply did move slightly on the underside, it was negligible.

Sanding fixed the issue and there wasnt flex or bounce any more than a regular padded floating floor.
 

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One thing you may need to do is install dry-lock subfloor system. This would help with any future problems you might have such as another flood. The only drawback is you have to cut all your door jambs and doors and you lose a little headroom. I cant remember exactly how much it is but I'm thinking you could go back with solid hardwood if you wanted to. Like I said your particular situation may not allow this modification but it's definetly worth looking at.

We installed it for a lady who had an exercise room in her finished basment and laid solid maple on it and it turned out great. It's an option.
 

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Thanks, Eaglei.

How is things going there?? Any better? Keep me in the info loop!

Most Insurance Companies will work with the Restoration Co. some are better than other! But, the HO doesn't pay out off pocket for the "clean-up/drying/etc." for the most part, just the deductible. They try not to get it into the MOLD stage, then ya are talking lots more money! And yes, we have the equipment as needed. I work for one of them there Big Name Companies, Local Owner!
We have the needed equipment to dry, air movement, pull water through hardwood, pull water out of walls with drywall, and PULL the moisture out of a wet F!*$ if needed! ( THAT IS THE BOSS'S JOB! ) LOL If not on hand, only a phone call away!
 
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