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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok this is driving my parents nuts. Washer on the second floor, the vibration is felt and heard in the kitchen below. They do not want to move it to the basement, we have put rubber mats, we had a carpenter build a box and we placed it on that with rubber mats, we have extended the legs on the machines, then another carpenter that my father works with came and took a look and he is still unsure. Hopefully one of you hold the solution to this problem! The photo with the kitchen in view, the top of the picture you can see through the banisters the doorway into the bathroom that the washer and dryer are in. Thanks everyone!!!
 

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I'm just taking a stab at a fix, although I'd imagine the deck underneath wouldn't help at all...If not, make it worse.
Anyhow, you might try something with more cushion. Maybe some cork board under feet or foam of some sort.
I personally think they are in a bad place to begin with and would also try and see if the washer is faulty.
 

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Did it always have this issue?
 

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Add as much mass as possible to the stand (500 lbs?) and place the washer on top of vibration isolation pads on top of that. There will still be some vibration.
 

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Joe The Handyman
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Is the floor "bouncy"?
Is the washer touching any wall?
I would think removing the wooden base and lowering the legs would help.
Is it on rubber pads made for a washer?

You can also try vibration isolation pads.
 

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1) Make sure the shipping retainers were removed
2) Make sure it is not touching anything besides the floor
3) Make sure it's level
4) Have a service call to make sure it's balancing correctly. Some washers won't balance on all size of loads.
5) The more flex in whatever it's on, the more vibration you'll get. I can't tell for sure, but it looks like it's in an alcove / closet type of area. If that's the case, try putting a double layer or 3/4" Advantech across the entire floor, and screw it down about every 6 inches. Besides stiffening the floor, this will help pick up some of the wall mass to help keep the vibration down.

6) If that doesn't work, go with Bob's 500 lb slab plan.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Its always had this issue since we moved in, back in 2007...this is now the 3rd washer installed and still the same problem =/ ...i know its been leveled, we have had sears out here to look at it..but ill tell them about these ideas and see what we comes from it...thank you all for your time!
 

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I had issues with my front load too. Granted mines on a concrete slab.... Found it would shake a little no matter what I did until I retracted one foot to throw it out of level and then push a shim under it until it stopped. Seemed to work alright for me.
 

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Its always had this issue since we moved in, back in 2007...this is now the 3rd washer installed and still the same problem =/ ...i know its been leveled, we have had sears out here to look at it..but ill tell them about these ideas and see what we comes from it...thank you all for your time!
Good luck with it, it looks like the obvious has been already covered a couple of times:sad:
 

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I had issues with my front load too. Granted mines on a concrete slab.... Found it would shake a little no matter what I did until I retracted one foot to throw it out of level and then push a shim under it until it stopped. Seemed to work alright for me.
I'm going to file that one away, good thinking:thumbsup: I assume I could get there by retracting one, and then screwing back down, but I don't think that's practical.
 

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hdavis said:
I'm going to file that one away, good thinking:thumbsup: I assume I could get there by retracting one, and then screwing back down, but I don't think that's practical.
But then you have the adjust the one in the back corner...
 

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My first thought was to do what CARPSFO said and do a huge mass of conc. as a platform, but Frank Castles sand filled box sounds even better. The sand will add the needed mass, & act as a damper at the same time.

Joe
 

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My first thought was to do what CARPSFO said and do a huge mass of conc. as a platform, but Frank Castles sand filled box sounds even better. The sand will add the needed mass, & act as a damper at the same time.

Joe
And the sand could be taken out... 500#s of concrete... not so much.
 

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And the sand could be taken out... 500#s of concrete... not so much.
Well that depends. It wouldn't have to be done as one piece. I was originally thinking 4 x 8 x 16 solid conc block in a box would work well, but as I said above, the sand box looks like a winner to me. The only thing I might add, is to isolate the sand box from the existing floor with maybe a foam or similar.
Joe
 

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Sandbox won't do much, nor will vibration reducing pads. The problem is the resonate frequency of the structure. Unless you can re-enforce the floor by sistering up some joists I think all efforts are in vein. If it's that big of an issue switch to a top load.
 

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Head Light Bulb Changer
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Just my thoughts -

The sandbox idea sounds like a good one. Maybe even layer some rubber or cork every 2-3" to help isolate vibration.

HOWEVER - It doesn't matter what you do (short of an extensive/expensive sound-proofing), you're still going to hear and feel the washer because of where it's placed. It's right over your head. No amount of anything will make it quiet. IMO, either move it or get used to it.
 

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Sandbox won't do much, nor will vibration reducing pads. The problem is the resonate frequency of the structure. Unless you can re-enforce the floor by sistering up some joists I think all efforts are in vein. If it's that big of an issue switch to a top load.
Anything that reduces the floor movement will decrease the resulting SPL. Adding a mass, stiffening the floor system through beefing up the top and / or bottom membranes, isolating the washer from the floor, building an enclosure that ties that floor into the joists above...

I personally don't know that floor's resonant frequency or any of the related structural elements.
 
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