Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a client that is considering converting a jacuzzi deck that I built a few years back into a cabana house for a new pool. The deck was built robustly to support the weight of the water and is in good condition. The question is: Can I simply frame walls on top of this deck with the 2 foot cantilevers on two sides? The framing is @ 12" O.C. but is only 2x6 lumber. I have attached a PDF of the framing layout.

Adding support or another beam along the exterior perimeter will be difficult at best so I would like to just use the cantilever if possible.

Any thoughts?

Thanks
 

Attachments

·
Pro
Joined
·
506 Posts
I have a client that is considering converting a jacuzzi deck that I built a few years back into a cabana house for a new pool. The deck was built robustly to support the weight of the water and is in good condition. The question is: Can I simply frame walls on top of this deck with the 2 foot cantilevers on two sides? The framing is @ 12" O.C. but is only 2x6 lumber. I have attached a PDF of the framing layout.

Adding support or another beam along the exterior perimeter will be difficult at best so I would like to just use the cantilever if possible.

Any thoughts?

Thanks
Not if there is code enforcement in your area.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
building on cantilevers

If you can install kick backs along the edge to another beam bolted to the post that may give you the required edge strength you are looking for. But if you try to bear your new walls on a 2 foot cantilever It will fail in while.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,257 Posts
I've seen houses w/ second story bumpouts that are cantilevered up to 2' -
9 1/2" TJIs as joists.
Where I personally don't like the idea of hanging weight off a cantilever, I daresay an engineer could definitively answer your question for you.

Mac
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,965 Posts
:whistling
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,965 Posts

·
Tech Geek
Joined
·
2,654 Posts
Even with standard dimensional lumber you can go 2/3 with 1/3 hanging...not to exceed the span tables. Just did a 4' cantilevered building off another building and it passed with flying colors...ADA compliant and everything. I used treated lumber when I could have gotten away with western just for the extra rigidity. Used 16' 2x12s to gain 4'. Not my idea..it was engineered.
Maybe for a deck, but when there's a load bearing wall going on it things change.
 

·
Tech Geek
Joined
·
2,654 Posts
Just for the record. I stand corrected.

2006 IBC said:
2308.12.6 Irregular structures. Conventional light-frame
construction shall not be used in irregular portions of structures
in Seismic Design Category D or E. Such irregular
portions of structures shall be designed to resist the forces
specified in Chapter 16 to the extent such irregular features
affect the performance of the conventional framing system.
A portion of a structure shall be considered to be irregular
where one or more of the conditions described in Items 1
through 6 below are present.
1. Where exterior braced wall panels are not in one plane
vertically from the foundation to the uppermost story
in which they are required, the structure shall be considered
to be irregular [see Figure 2308.12.6(1)].
Exception: Floors with cantilevers or setbacks not
exceeding four times the nominal depth of the
floor joists [see Figure 2308.12.6(2)] are permitted
to support braced wall panels provided:
1. Floor joists are 2 inches by 10 inches (51mm
by 254 mm) or larger and spaced not more
than 16 inches (406 mm) o.c.
2. The ratio of the back span to the cantilever is
at least 2:1.
3. Floor joists at ends of braced wall panels are
doubled.
4. A continuous rim joist is connected to the
ends of cantilevered joists. The rim joist is
permitted to be spliced using a metal tie not
less than 0.058 inch (1.47 mm) (16 galvanized
gage) and 11/2 inches (38 mm) wide
fastened with six 16d common nails on each
side. The metal tie shall have a minimum
yield of 33,000 psi (227 MPa).
5. Joists at setbacks or the end of cantilevered
joists shall not carry gravity loads from more
than a single story having uniform wall and
roof loads, nor carry the reactions from
headers having a span of 8 feet (2438 mm) or
more.
 

·
Maker of fine kindling
Joined
·
6,199 Posts
Code is you're not allowed to cantilever more than the width of the joist. 2x12=12"cantilever.
Just for the record. I stand corrected.
I'm glad to see you did some homework on that one.

There are a ton of split levels and raised ranch houses that I was a part of that have a 2' cantilever with 2x10 16"oc floor joists.

I was wondering if they all have fallen down yet.:laughing:
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top