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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello Everyone,

I just started a bathroom remodel in the bay area,Ca and have demo everything to the studs.
For this project I have to install a Geberit wall hung toilet. I have installed these before with out a problem.

On this particular project, it happens that there is a 4' vent in the wall and in the way.

Note, bathroom is on the second floor.

how can i reroute to accommodate for wall hung toilet?
 

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NestoG510 said:
Hello Everyone, I just started a bathroom remodel in the bay area,Ca and have demo everything to the studs. For this project I have to install a Geberit wall hung toilet. I have installed these before with out a problem. On this particular project, it happens that there is a 4' vent in the wall and in the way. Note, bathroom is on the second floor. how can i reroute to accommodate for wall hung toilet?
Looks like your gonna have to re route the vent if you can't put the toilet in a different place. Even if you could move the toilet your gonna have to cut a lot of that vent out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
First of all – welcome to CT! You really should do an intro post.

I checked and there is indeed a company with your name in the Bay Area so...

I’m confused by your post. None of the toilets you’ve replaced before had a vent? :eek:
Thanks for the tip about intro post,

toilets i have replaced have had vents just not directly behind it.
for example, one toilet had exterior plumbing so there was space to put in wall hung toilet kit.
in other the location was slightly different.

in this case, i need to put the kit right where the vent is.
 

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Like BC said, you’re going to have to reroute the vent. This should not be a big deal since you need to remove the flange and closet bend anyway. Your plumber should have little problem with this reroute.

I’m guessing (based on the picture) the original work is fairly old – so hopefully you won’t have much repairing of plaster on the ceiling/walls below.

Good luck!
 

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Snap the vent above the tee twice, remove the piece of CI, burn the tee out of the hub below it, and reroute the vent stack with four 1/8 bends and a sission joint. This isn't rocket surgery.
This is where I have a battle with my plumber also, he says "just remove the studs" not caring that it is a load bearing wall and the upper portion of the vent cannot be moved with out doing work in the room above. I can't put a header in if the pipe is in the way. He always is willing to remove any studs that get in his way.
 

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Snap the vent above the tee twice, remove the piece of CI, burn the tee out of the hub below it, and reroute the vent stack with four 1/8 bends and a sission joint. This isn't rocket surgery.
As I understand it, the drain from the toilet drops straight down, into what we think of as the existing vent stack. Is there now a tee or wye sending the vent off to the side?
 

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As I understand it, the drain from the toilet drops straight down, into what we think of as the existing vent stack. Is there now a tee or wye sending the vent off to the side?
You would cut the 4" cast iron below the floor (yes, there will have to be some demo and patch work on the first floor). You would then reduce the stack to 3" with a CP-43 shielded coupling, install a 3" C/O tee to be used as a test point and then stack a 3x2" Wye above the test tee. The 3" would go vertically up the wall to pick up the carrier and the 2" would go horizontally through the wall of the floor below before changing direction and transitioning to vertical in the adjacent stud bay.

Assuming this isn't the only bathroom in the house, the cross sectional requirement would have already been met by the other bathroom(s) and you would be free to yard out the oversized 4" VTR and replace it with a 2" VTR. Yeah, some demo of the ceiling/attic space of the 2nd floor is going to have to happen in order to make this work.

This is isn't Rocket Surgery -- You just need to know what you're doing and you need to stand your ground when the GC starts flipping you a steaming pile of poo about having to open up walls and ceilings in spaces he/she didn't account for. A good GC wouldn't bid a project like this w/out first consulting the other Trades involved in the project. Period. I generally walk away from projects where the GC expects me to perform miracles. There is zero profit to be made in sucking up to folks with unrealistic expectations. Sucking up is a dangerous (and expensive) precedent to set. Period.

It isn't Brain Science, not by any stretch of the imagination. But it does require some coordination with the other Trades. GC's who argue with me and limit my ability to do the job correctly are kicked to the curb.
 

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This is where I have a battle with my plumber also, he says "just remove the studs" not caring that it is a load bearing wall and the upper portion of the vent cannot be moved with out doing work in the room above. I can't put a header in if the pipe is in the way. He always is willing to remove any studs that get in his way.
There wouldn't be a battle if you listened to the Plumber and took his/her advice.

We're there to get the job done as quickly and as efficiently as possible, not get in a pissing match with a combative GC.

You hired us to do something you couldn't do yourself -- Let us do it the way it needs to be done so the job can keep moving forward.
 

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Capra Aegagrus
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You hired us to do something you couldn't do yourself -- Let us do it the way it needs to be done so the job can keep moving forward.
That's all well and good, but when did they start training plumbers in the fine details of framing codes and structural stress analysis? No specialty fully trumps another; it needs to be a cooperative effort.
 

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That's all well and good, but when did they start training plumbers in the fine details of framing codes and structural stress analysis? No specialty fully trumps another; it needs to be a cooperative effort.
Cow patties.

Framing can always be fixed. Always. It may cost a bundle, but there are still ways to correct butchery.

Plumbing, OTOH, must still follow the laws of gravity and physics.

Also, you missed the point -- It isn't my job to keep promises the GC shouldn't have made to the HO in the first place. My job is to get the poopy out of the building as expeditiously as possible.

And just so we're clear, I don't have a combative relationship with my GC's -- They respect my wisdom and make me a part of the bidding/budgeting process. Not one of them would go in on a job like this and start throwing numbers around w/out first seeking my input.
 

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Widdershins said:
Cow patties.

Framing can always be fixed. Always. It may cost a bundle, but there are still ways to correct butchery.

Plumbing, OTOH, must still follow the laws of gravity and physics.

Also, you missed the point -- It isn't my job to keep promises the GC shouldn't have made to the HO in the first place. My job is to get the poopy out of the building as expeditiously as possible.

And just so we're clear, I don't have a combative relationship with my GC's -- They respect my wisdom and make me a part of the bidding/budgeting process. Not one of them would go in on a job like this and start throwing numbers around w/out first seeking my input.
That's right framing has nothing to do with gravity, or load paths. You still have not mentions how to move your pipe over to another stud bay without doing work in the room above or below while still staying within the 3 1/2" wall thickness. If you have to do work above and below it would be more cost effective just to build out to fit the relocated pipe.
 

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Cow patties.

Framing can always be fixed. Always. It may cost a bundle, but there are still ways to correct butchery.

Plumbing, OTOH, must still follow the laws of gravity and physics.

Also, you missed the point -- It isn't my job to keep promises the GC shouldn't have made to the HO in the first place. My job is to get the poopy out of the building as expeditiously as possible.

And just so we're clear, I don't have a combative relationship with my GC's -- They respect my wisdom and make me a part of the bidding/budgeting process. Not one of them would go in on a job like this and start throwing numbers around w/out first seeking my input.
Hey, Cow Patties.

Removing butcher plumbers from the project can always be done. Always! It doesn’t cost a dime!

Framing follows the laws of gravity, wind shear, live load, dead load and physics.

You missed the point – “No specialty trumps another” – not “always” – not sometimes – NEVER!

And just so we’re clear, you now have a combative relationship here! Your 3 posts here have not earned any respect for your “wisdom” and based on what I’ve seen here, I would not go to a project with you.

You assume that the OP screwed-up and doesn’t have the budget to do it – with or without your help or “butchery”. You also assume that a member here, that has earned our respect, needs input from a newbie who doesn’t have the balls to post his/her real name, location, website…

I don’t/won’t seek/want/need your input. Kicking you to the curb!
 

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you could add a 2nd 2x4 wall and put the in the wall toilet stuff in front of the vent pipe
Simple easy solution. ^^^

I'm in the same situation, except there is a tub/shower adjacent to the WC, so I can't fur out the wall behind the WC to accommodate the wall mount toilet, due to space constraint.

Solution, change order...."it's going to cost an extra 600 bucks because of this 4" cast iron stack in the way, which was an unforeseen circumstance, or we can get a traditional floor mount...."

Problem solved.

True story
 

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Capra Aegagrus
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Framing can always be fixed. Always. It may cost a bundle, but there are still ways to correct butchery.

Plumbing, OTOH, must still follow the laws of gravity and physics.
So you confess to butchery, eh? :laughing:

News flash: Framing follows those same laws, and without proper framing, you won't have a stable structure within which to ply your trade. Butchering that structure does no one any good.

A good end result requires cooperation between the trades; a prima donna approach by any one of them is a losing proposition.
 
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