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Livin the dream...
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got my first vinyl plank floor. Will be going over old hardwood floor and linoleum in laundry room.

What is the recommendation for prep? Any tips for a first timer?

Plan is to use floor leveler then staple luan over entire floor. I don't think existing floor will be good enough (covered in carpet now) and I know telegraphing can be an issue in time.

Product is Shaw Versalock Vinyl Planks - http://www.lowes.com/pd_516563-57077-LX90100705_0__?storeNumber=1773&selectedLocalStoreBeanArray=[com.lowes.commerce.storelocator.beans.LocatorStoreBean%4042074207]&productId=50047993&ipTrail=192.237.245.183

Am I on the right track?
 

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Paul
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Without seeing the shape of what's down it's hard to say, but its a floating product. Luan sounds like overkill if the existing can be made flat with patching.
 

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Paul
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Floating vinyl plank is quite thick/dense. It doesn't telegraph nearly as easy as sheet goods or vct. Not saying it won't but it's not as critical.
 
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Livin the dream...
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Floating vinyl plank is quite thick/dense. It doesn't telegraph nearly as easy as sheet goods or vct. Not saying it won't but it's not as critical.
Thanks. I'm looking at buying one of those bullet tools magnum shears I know you love. :thumbup: I'm getting quite a bit of flooring jobs lined up. Might as well make money from the get go.
 

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Flooring Installer
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Probably better off without luan, it has too many voids in the plys and can bleed. If you feel that you need something, use underlayment plywood.
 

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Paul
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Thanks. I'm looking at buying one of those bullet tools magnum shears I know you love. :thumbup: I'm getting quite a bit of flooring jobs lined up. Might as well make money from the get go.
If you plan to keep doing floors it will be the best investment you could make, tool wise.
 
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Thanks. I'm looking at buying one of those bullet tools magnum shears I know you love. :thumbup: I'm getting quite a bit of flooring jobs lined up. Might as well make money from the get go.
Make sure you have more work line up first, I've bought many specialty tools when I though my business was going to venture in that direction then they sit around for years.

I'd knock this one out with a speed square, a jig saw, a multi master and an extension cord.
 

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Livin the dream...
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Make sure you have more work line up first, I've bought many specialty tools when I though my business was going to venture in that direction then they sit around for years.

I'd knock this one out with a speed square, a jig saw, a multi master and an extension cord.
Point taken.

I've got two floors scheduled for the last week of the month. Assuming I get the go ahead tonight for the second one I'll probably pull the trigger on it. It would save a lot of time on both jobs. Pay it off with the profit for the week. After that its a money maker. I've got more flooring lined up down the road also where I know it will come in really handy.

It always sucks paying the money for expensive tools. Then I hold off and go the "just get by" route and end up buying the tool later anyway and wonder why I didn't just get it to begin with. We'll see what happens.
 

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Livin the dream...
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I do a lot of vinyl plank. You can score and snap them very easily. I have the bullet shear and use it every day for my laminate installs but the score and snap is much faster for the planks.
Good to know. I've got a hardwood floor to do in an occupied house at the top of a stairs. Can't set up a saw inside. The shear would be perfect if it works. Also have another engineered hardwood I'd like to use it on.

Do you square your cuts when you score and snap or just eye ball it?
 

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Owner/Installer
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I use a square but I'm a bit more obsessive than most. I have the Magnum shear which they say will cut 3/4 oak bit I feel like I'm going to break the damn thing trying. You're very off with a small miter saw with a shop vac attached or just bring a helper and make them run up and down the stairs to make cuts.
 

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I have the 20" magnum shear, dam thing is heavy, not something to just pick up and move anywhere. I believe the 13" would be ideal for portability. The miter cuts is why the need for the width of cut. We cut carpet tile 4" for base where the 20" cutter was useful . For thick vinyl plank you could use a cheaper laminate cutter, just helps for hand fatigue, no VCT cutter though
 

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We just did a vinyl laminate job. The homeowner bought the stuff. He already had it purchased when I bid the job. It cut with a sharp utility knife. Pretty easy. Went down quick. We laid underlayment down becuase I was afraid the existing floor was not smooth enough. I don't know if I had to, but I feel better starting off with a smooth surface.
The stuff we put down wasn't very durable. It was about 1/8" thick. Not solid thickness, It was hollow in the middle. The next day I dropped my speed square and it made a significant dent. It was in the doorway and we were able to pull the piece and replace it.
Just letting you know to go easy on it after it is installed. Of course your product may be different.
 

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whatever you do not use cork as an underlayment. a I was doing a kitchen and they had a local flooring company do there vinyl plank flooring on the whole first floor of the house, it was a lot of flooring.
they used cork underlayment and the fridge sank into the floor and when they would sit at the table there chairs would sink into the floor.
not only that but they stored the floor out side while installing it and when it got warm enough to turn there a.c. on the floor started to gap in the kitchen area. after a few weeks there was a 1/4" gap.

they had to come back and tear it all out and re install it.
nicko
 

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Paul
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I have the 20" magnum shear, dam thing is heavy, not something to just pick up and move anywhere. I believe the 13" would be ideal for portability. The miter cuts is why the need for the width of cut. We cut carpet tile 4" for base where the 20" cutter was useful . For thick vinyl plank you could use a cheaper laminate cutter, just helps for hand fatigue, no VCT cutter though
I have two 13s. On large laminate, engineered, plank, vct, etc. It saves so much time by having one at either end of the job that they literally pay for themselves after a few jobs. Yes you can cut plank just fine with a speed square and a utility knife. On larger jobs I'm normally making multiple cuts at a time. I guarantee I'm quicker with the shear than anybody is with a speed square...I'm about working efficient and smart - not hard and cheap. You can cut trim with a hand miter too, but why would you want to?
 
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Make sure you have more work line up first, I've bought many specialty tools when I though my business was going to venture in that direction then they sit around for years.

I'd knock this one out with a speed square, a jig saw, a multi master and an extension cord.
Double and triple the recommendation for the multi tool. You simply can't beat it for undercutting jams and door casing. I wouldn't go to a flooring job without it anymore, and for that matter, about a hundred other jobs.
 

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Got my first vinyl plank floor. Will be going over old hardwood floor and linoleum in laundry room.

What is the recommendation for prep? Any tips for a first timer?

Plan is to use floor leveler then staple luan over entire floor. I don't think existing floor will be good enough (covered in carpet now) and I know telegraphing can be an issue in time.

Am I on the right track?
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I'd be a little concerned about what you use for a "floor leveler" with the plan of laying a sheet of "luan" over top-------and then obviously nailing, stapling or screwing through. I don't do any residential to speak of but I have in the past and still encounter some wood subfloors and underlayment issues on occasion.

Generally speaking it's an either/or as opposed to an and-----with regard to leveling and smoothing with cement patch or ply. I know there's been a few instances where I did some patch UNDER a plywood but it's rare and you certainly wouldn't want any extensive (wide areas or deep fills) under the ply. Better to just go with a heavy enough ply and/or layered materials to get the floor flat and smooth OR just screed, float, skim/emboss as necessary.

Make a long story short I'm either going to float or ply------not both. Very odd this concept of a "floating installation" given the specific instructions I read in the link you provided. Essentially for ANY warranty I found the procedures and disclaimers the same as you'd get for the glue down versions. So what's the point?
 

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spazman
Flooring
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Can someone fill me in on the magnum sheers? I install a lot of the floating vinyl plank and anything to speed up cutting it would be nice to have. I have been using my VCT cutter for cross cuts but length cuts are a pain.
 

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Paul
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Can someone fill me in on the magnum sheers? I install a lot of the floating vinyl plank and anything to speed up cutting it would be nice to have. I have been using my VCT cutter for cross cuts but length cuts are a pain.
Rip cuts are what they are - none of the cutters are going to help you there. If you have a decent vct cutter already then a shear isn't going to gain you anything on vinyl plank. If you install laminate or engineered a shear will be worth it's weight in dollar bills.
 
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