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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A few yeas back i had an additional put on. In the original house, i had a full bath and powder room with a sink. they added a stall shower and i asked about the venting. well needless to say, it bubbles in the downstairs basement. my question is, besides ripping up the bathroom, is there a way i can vent in the wall cavity ?
 

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Fentoozler
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Air Admittance Valve or Stupor vent ~ IF ALLOWED/LEGAL in your location.
 

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The Old Master
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A few yeas back i had an additional put on. In the original house, i had a full bath and powder room with a sink. they added a stall shower and i asked about the venting. well needless to say, it bubbles in the downstairs basement. my question is, besides ripping up the bathroom, is there a way i can vent in the wall cavity ?
Per your post "bubbling in the basement" Did it always do that from new, or did it just start? It is posible you do not even have a venting problem. You could have a drainage problem down stream from where it is bubbling. It could also be an evaporated trap in the basement (like a floor drain) that is not used frequently. The fix would be to pour some water down the drain see if the bubbling sound stops.
 

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the pipe master
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AAVs will not work in all situations. It depends on where/what the problem are.

They won't work if there are bellies in the line or if there is a high volume fixture like a laundry machine between the addition to be vented and the closest VTR.
Air Admittance Valve or Stupor vent ~ IF ALLOWED/LEGAL in your location.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The issue started right away. the bathroom is actually on the first floor, not the basement. Every time the upstairs toilet is flushed, the downstairs toilet bubbles up and you can hear the air being pushed up through in the form of big splashing bubbles. also from time to time, the downstairs toilet will not flush, and after plunging and flushing the upstairs toilet, the downstairs will all of a sudden get sucked through hard. hope this explanation is better.
 

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It sounds like the toilet waste pipe is too small. I see this happen once when a guy had reduced down from 4" soil pipe to 2" waste pipe and when you flushed one toilet on the same run as another toilet it would cause a plunger effect and the air in front of the water would be pushed out of all the lower traps and toilets. There are a few other reasons that could cause this. Blocked wastes, T's fitted in the wrong direction, Bad pipe sizing and so on. I would get the guy back who fitted the bathroom.
 

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The Old Master
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The issue started right away. the bathroom is actually on the first floor, not the basement. Every time the upstairs toilet is flushed, the downstairs toilet bubbles up and you can hear the air being pushed up through in the form of big splashing bubbles. also from time to time, the downstairs toilet will not flush, and after plunging and flushing the upstairs toilet, the downstairs will all of a sudden get sucked through hard. hope this explanation is better.
Philadelphia, like most east cost cities uses house traps in the plumbing system. A house trap requires a fresh air inlet. Normally air is sucked into the plumbing system through this pipe via the vents on the roof acting as chimneys. It works good to ventilate the system. But the house trap retains a big body of water and when a body of water is coming from IE: a toilet being flushed, the air in the pipe must be relieved or the system will not flush. At that point the fresh air inlet is not drawing air it is releaving the air trapped between the two bodies of water. Sounds to me that your problem is a blocked fresh air inlet.
 
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