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I am remodeling a kitchen where the range hood is on an interior wall. There is no option to go up or straight out, but there is the option to go down and back out underneath the kitchen. Does anyone know if this can be done using inline duct fans? It needs to travel back about 11 ft. Any help is greatly appreciated.
 

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Most range hoods will tell the maximum duct work distance and minimum duct size. Every elbow count as so many feet of run....
Worst case you might need to get a more powerful range hood fan.
The other option is to just use a shell and put the motor and fan on the exterior and pull the exhaust. This usually costs a lot more but it is very quiet and does work well.
Bill T
 

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I think you can do anything with inline fans. It would be good to be able to access them and clean (gross) them periodically. Every down draft hood I've seen has sucked. The best was a wolf, but you had to crank it for it to work and it would start sucking the gas flame towards it. WTF
 

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I've ran into this in the past a few times.

What I did was run rectangular duct pipes straight down and then did whatever was necessary in the basement to get it outside. Depends on your joist configuration. I ran my duct up to a few inches from the top plate and later cut out my 8 inch hole, don't have to worry if your duct in the wall is high enough. Never had a problem with air flow.
 

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whats the point of ducting smells UNDER where they are created? If you cant go outside or to where attic heat will draw foul smells up you might as well just use a carbon filter IMHO
 

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I've run ducting through the top shelf in cabinets to the nearest exterior wall. Or through the joist bays of the ceiling. There's pretty much always a better way than down. It just may be more complicated initially.
 

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If the air flow is strong enough there would be no reason for any foul smells to linger in the pipes. I don't really feel the need to defend my decision on going down but I can assure you there was no way to vent upwards without massive re-structuring.
 
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