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#1 stunner
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Went to bid a remodeling job with the plumbing already roughed in 13 years ago. There is a toilet flange and on down a drainage hooked up for the vanity sink which is a 2" line. On out roughly 6' or so there is a 1 1/2" pvc pipe for the shower.

My problem is this is in the basement and there is no way to vent any of the plumbing with out doing a wet vent (which I want) or coming out the rim joist then going out the side of the house which I rather not do because of looks.


I was thinking about using something as an air admittance valve but I have never used one before are they prone to failure? would one work well for both the shower, vanity, and toilet or would I need 2? I gotta work up the bid then if they accept my bid I will be calling my plumber to check out the 13 year old plumbing as I don't want to warranty anything I didn't install.

Im up for ideas, here are a couple of pics to get an idea.

link to the valve http://www.oatey.com/apps/catalog/instance_assets/assets/Submittal_Sheet/6DFU.pdf







Sorry for the crappy camera phone pics.
 

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I have used AAV's/Durgo's hundreds of times in the UK. In fact almost every trap comes with one installed. The ones on the traps ain't the best but they work but i don't think i have ever seen them over here anyways but the type you show in your link are fine. The problem is with code and do they allow them. AAV's work very well and you mostly only ever need one vent to atmosphere preferably at end of run but many codes say otherwise. Like the house across the road from me with 10 vents sticking out of the roof? :w00t: As you should know they are only designed to let air in not out so if water does ever back up in the system the water wont come out of the AAV. It will be coming out of the fixtures long before it would come out of the AAV.
 

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If you're going to pull permits make sure that AAV's are accepted by the building department. I've always liked the idea of reducing the number of roof penetrations but have been concerned about long term reliability.............................
 

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#1 stunner
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well on this application it is impossible to go through the roof (possible but would add serious amounts of money to the job) or into existing vents with out doing a wet vent. I don't have to pull any permits nor does it have to be inspected so regarding the AAV if they are allowed are not is not an issue in this particular home location.

I am trying to bid this very competitive because I need this job they are getting very slim in this area. So I am looking for other solutions for venting rather then an ugly option or ripping up drywall, patching, paint, etc for a roof penetration to save on cost.
 

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AAV's have been used for many years in Sweden which is where they were developed (I think). Maybe think about having it placed where it could be checked periodically to ensure that it is operating as designed. Good luck on the bidding.
 

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#1 stunner
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Really? Where are you located that there is no building department???? :eek:
The joys of farm houses. :laughing: It varies from county to county, sometimes I don't have to pull a single permit some times it seems like I have to pull them for pulling in the driveway sometimes. .

AAV's have been used for many years in Sweden which is where they were developed (I think). Maybe think about having it placed where it could be checked periodically to ensure that it is operating as designed. Good luck on the bidding.
I believe thats what I am going to do, the home owners requested panel board for a wall covering so if there is a problem it can be somewhat easily accessible.
 

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My sister lives in rural Missouri and is in the process of building a house with no permits...............
 

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Air admittance valves/vent piping

Hi. Based on what you say it appears that some pvc drain lines were roughed-in for a lavatory sink, a water closet (toilet for those of you who are not plumbers) and a tub or shower. If this is the case then by all means you can use a studor-vent(air admittance valve) in stead of continuing the vertical lav drain up through the roof (or better, trying to tie-in to an existing vent). Having done new construction plumbing for years, there were many homes where we would install studor vent rather than run the stack up through the roof. I as a plumber prefer a vent stack for (2) reasons: it can't malfunction like an air admittance valve and a clogged drain line is easily cleared from a stack on a single-story roof. Whenever I had a service call where a drain line was clogged, I hated it when I didn't have easy access to the drain. I have also seen where the AAV goes bad and the fixtures won't drain and/or there is a terrible sewer gas odor in the bathroom. However, in your case you will need to use one just to get this job contract and keep your price low. Place it in an accessible location (required by most plumbing codes) . Hope this information helps.
 

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Da Grump
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theres no future vent dropped down through the 1st floor anyplace? if not is it possible to follow existing stack up to 1st floor and tie in above flood level of existing fixtures? ;)
 
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