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We do the vegetable thing also. Late tomatoes are delightful, and squash for dinner about every evening. Unfortunately, too much harvest at one time. I wish avacodo trees could survive here. Canning is a PITA. It would be nice if one could have a years worth of tomatoes throughout the whole year vs. a years worth of tomatoes in about 1-2 months.

The Jersey boys here are quite proud of their tomatoes. I "grew" chickens last year. The benefit is they freeze easily, and I knew they were treated humanely (until ...)
 

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Nights have been a little cold until recently, so only cold hardy stuff has been planted - that's changing starting today. Prep started a couple months ago. Started seeds under lights, transferred some of the plants to a heated greenhouse, and they're ready to go.

Some crops over-winter here - scallions and Russian Kale, for instance, and asparagus has already been picked. Chives over-winter in a cold frame, so those have been picked as well.
 

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Talking Head
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Square foot gardening has some good ideas but it's a hell of a lot of trouble if you have a decent amount of space. I use it for a few things that turn over pretty regularly but just give some of the spreading plants their room. Crockett's Victory Garden is the book I recommend to new gardeners. All the learning is really most helpful after the first year. Just remember to save all the varietal names that you use each year so you can get the same ones next year or avoid them if they didn't pan out.
 

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Brian are you trying to grow a few patio stone trees?
 

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Square foot gardening has some good ideas but it's a hell of a lot of trouble if you have a decent amount of space. I use it for a few things that turn over pretty regularly but just give some of the spreading plants their room. Crockett's Victory Garden is the book I recommend to new gardeners. All the learning is really most helpful after the first year. Just remember to save all the varietal names that you use each year so you can get the same ones next year or avoid them if they didn't pan out.
Agreed. I was looking at the spaces he had, and it seemed to be a good fit.
 

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I hate tomatoes, but I have found a solution by growing one monster plant iin a large pot/planter. I get the baby it daily with little effort and protect to get the first ripe tomato and the biggest one. It takes little time and space.

When I was living in Virginia, I use a 24x24 (about) plastic planter with a drain tray. I planted a couple of seeds and set it on the south side of my garage and then started building a 6' high cage from 1/2 pvc tubes and connectors. It worked so well that the monster grew over the top of the 6' cage and down nearly to the ground. - Over-fertilizing does wonders.

The bad thing was that area saw some gentle winds that would blow the assembly over almost daily and it was necessary to provide enough water daily to provide weight and ballast for stability.

the tomatoes were big and very early, but my neighbors seemed to avoid me after a while since I could not get rid of them.

Now I am trying to grow Zucchini on one bush plant and try to keep up with picking and avoiding the ones not picked the day earlier. - I learned you can never give away enough Zucchini since I had two bushes last year.

If you do not have a need and cannot store/save it, a garden is a problem if it does well, so I am limited to very small space.
 
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Radical Basement Dweller
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Anyone else planting veggies......garden.....
I've planted a 30 x 70 vegetable garden for years. This year just going with tomatoes (mostly for canning), varieties of peppers, a variety of melons and some herbs.
 

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Wood Craftsman
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
That's a pretty good size garden Rob.....ours is a lot smaller than that . It's 22' in length and 15' deep ,minus the shed. I just hope everything turns out well. The lighting , due to the shed and those tree limbs, is not a "full sun" all day and may be a problem but so far all the plants are doing very well.
 

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I grew up with my folks planting big gardens. Notice the plural on gardens. They were always gardens along the lines of what Robbie plants.

Jenny & I used to plant one garden that size, but as our business grew, we didn't have the time. This year, I've decided to get back into gardening. The new shop sets on 1 1/2 acres that used to be cattle pasture & the soil hasn't been turned in decades. I disced & tilled an area along the lines of Robbies garden & put in 8 tomato plants. 4 of them being cherries, 2 early girls & 2 better boys. Every plant is already setting tomatoes & are blooming like crazy.

I put in 2 hills of cucumbers (3 plants per hill) 2 hills of watermellons (3 plants per hill) & 1 hill of cantelope (3 plants per hill) Also got 4 rows of okra. Love some fried okra. I'll take my camera down later & get some pics.
 

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Radical Basement Dweller
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My problem is that I get the garden planted and looking beautiful and as time goes by and it's 98* in the shade and the mosquitoes fly in formation, my interest in weeding declines rapidly.

I use copious quantities of mulch around the plants themselves to keep them weed-free but the rest of it grows up and looks pretty nasty by the end of the season.
 

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My problem is that I get the garden planted and looking beautiful and as time goes by and it's 98* in the shade and the mosquitoes fly in formation, my interest in weeding declines rapidly.

I use copious quantities of mulch around the plants themselves to keep them weed-free but the rest of it grows up and looks pretty nasty by the end of the season.

Buy you a mantis tiller. Gas powered hoe.:laughing:

It's amazing how well one of those little tillers can dig.
 

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Radical Basement Dweller
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I've got both a big one and a small one...not a Mantis but small enough to turn on a dime. It's still a PITA when it's so hot. Plus, I'm a mosquito magnet. I can walk 100' to get the mail and come back in with 4 bites. DEET is my friend but keeping it applied all the time is also a PITA.
 

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I've got one in the first link...very old. My Dad restored it and it looks like new. Never tried it and have no intentions to.....:whistling
 

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Nice. Do you have good light back there, esp. against the wall?

I'm a tomato guy, and this year added some lettuce. Occasional dose of soluble fertilizer (miracle grow or similar, as directed), is helpful. I used to forget to label my tomato plants (varieties), but it makes a difference as you figure out the ones you really like. (Brandywine is a good one for me, among others....medium fruit, thin-skin, tasty, perfect on sandwiches or solo.)
 

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hack of all trades
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heres my little 9' x 4' raised bed made with lumber and yard scrap. im trying out this biochar, which is a soil amendment of charred wood that you inoculate with beneficial microorganisms. its a great way to dispose of cut offs and clean demo scraps... and it looks badass! :thumbup:
 

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Wood Craftsman
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I got my inspiration from this.....(for those that know my affection for Oliver machinery) ,,,,, why stop there......:blink:...:laughing:




All kidding aside.....

I wanted to be able to walk around in the garden with out stepping in mud.....is that called "snob farming":blink:....:laughing:


Works for me......
 
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