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I am not sure what to do. I am looking for the best way. Does a van draw more attention or a Trailer? I have a Jeep Wrangler. So that would be the tow truck if I did get a trailer.
But, I also see box trucks. They look like they would be a good option. It would be like home Depot on wheels.
I will buy a better truck for hauling once I start making some money. But my question is if the trailer would get more attention or would the Van? thanks
 

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Bsecdone said:
I am not sure what to do. I am looking for the best way. Does a van draw more attention or a Trailer? I have a Jeep Wrangler. So that would be the tow truck if I did get a trailer.
But, I also see box trucks. They look like they would be a good option. It would be like home Depot on wheels.
I will buy a better truck for hauling once I start making some money. But my question is if the trailer would get more attention or would the Van? thanks
I am in the middle of starting my business. I plan to be up and running by March 1st 2006. I have a new ford f250 PU and I have a 5'8' trailer. I figured that it would be nice to hitch and unhitch trailer as needed and also have the space in the pick up. Not sure how practical it will be in the real world but as I already have the truck it was cheaper and easier to just add the trailer. Also I am not a big contractor just a handyman.
 

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Depending on where you work, a trailer could be a pain in the neck. I see trailers working out best for guys that do projects where they'll be there for more than a few weeks. Drop your trailer at the jobsite, lock up the hitch for security, and you're all set. If you're doing small jobs or service calls in established neighborhoods, I can see pulling and parking a trailer could be a royal pain in the arse. Even among the guys that do pull the trailer behind their truck every day, they're only pulling a trailer because their truck or van is already full, and the trailer is a necessity. I have mostly walk-in trucks (step vans). They're working out better for me than any other type I've ever used.

Just my opinion.
 

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Since I'm having to start from scratch, I just bought a new-to-me Chevy 30 van. Like any other van, with a 1 ton chassis. I got all of the tools I use the most in there and some extra materials, i.e. fasteners, a few plumbing fittings, a few assorted electrical parts, etc. Since I do rehabs and such, this works. But as time goes on and money allows, I will be getting a step van. My dad used one for his company and it worked out great except when he needed to haul material over 12' in snow and rain, lol, like drywall. I found a company in Decatur, IN that all they sell are step vans. They have a 18' '88 Chevy for $4K I'm looking at, but money is tight.

Step vans are a good chice IMHO if you do different types of work. You can easily store every tool you need.

But, until I can get the step van, I may have a connection to use of a 18' trailer to haul the bigger less used tools and equipment I have. Like my scaffolding, panel lift, table saw, etc.
 

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I totally agree that the trailer would be a huge pain. A lot of it depends on how much money you have. I started off with a Ranger for about a year, then currently have a Tundra with lockable/retractable bed cover, lumber rack and hi-side boxes, I could still use more room.
 

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I've done the pick-up, pick-up with trailer, cube van and can tell you hand down the box van/cube van is the ONLY way to go. Many residential jobs with tight driveways, busy streets, no yards, etc....are a major PITA to deal with parking your rig for the typical in and out type work. I still use my open trailer for hauling siding/roffing/etc...big material that will be on a jobsite for awhile. I'm getting VERY spoiled having literally every tool I need to build anythiing I want in one vehicle with room to spare for material, no matter what the job, no matter what the headaches, I have the tools on hand to conquer the situation. Looking back I wish I would hve bought this beast years ago!!!

Regular vans are okay in the right profession, I've already got 2 of my flooring guys to switch over from 1T pass vans to cube vans once they opened the door to the box and seen all the room. I picked mine up used from Uhaul for $4500, 1989 F-350 7.3 diesel and 17' box which 3' of that is over the cab, interior was like brand new and tires were brand new, motor/tranny work great with only 166K on the ticker. Shop around cuz deals are out there. Our Uhaul listed these bigger vans at $5875, but when I called and talked to him he said they let them go all day at $4500 so told him I'd be up to buy one, then just went through and got pick of the litter.

I think either way both get attention since they're both rolling bill boards, just depends on how you want to gussy them up to get eye appeal.
 

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What kind of fuel milage do you get on that uhaul van . I have always used gas 1-ton pass. vans but I'm debaiting truck and trailor or box truck. I do mostly flooring work and ceiling tile. Joe
 

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To be completely honest I have no idea, only thing I can realte to is this: My truck gets 10mpg loaded/unloaded, no matter what. Most times both trucks drive to the sme job sites and when the truck is needing to get filled the cubey is still 3/8-1/2 tank...keep in mind this thing weighs 10,640lbs too after I come back through the scales in the landfill.

Would guess it to be in the 14-16mpg range...if I had to guess, hard to tell since most of the driving is in town, but even weighing as much as it does, and NOT havng the turbo, this thing sure gets going a hellava lot better from a stop than my truck :Thumbs:
 

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i would say that a box van like IHi said because you can have all of your tools spare parts and room for supplys. it is also all in one place for you to get and u dont have to worry about a storeg spot for the trailler.
 

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I have been having good luck with my trailer. I use my truck for calls and other running around and am glad I can unhook all my tools. Gas mileage is better, no worry about theft. I'm sure a box truck would be nice if I only used the truck for site work. But to me a trailer is a great way to have it both ways. Maybe when I get HUGE (as Billy would say) I'll move to the box.
I think it depends on your circumstance and intended uses. I'm very happy not loading and unloading my pickup every day :)
 

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MinConst said:
I have been having good luck with my trailer. I use my truck for calls and other running around and am glad I can unhook all my tools. Gas mileage is better, no worry about theft. I'm sure a box truck would be nice if I only used the truck for site work. But to me a trailer is a great way to have it both ways. Maybe when I get HUGE (as Billy would say) I'll move to the box.
I think it depends on your circumstance and intended uses. I'm very happy not loading and unloading my pickup every day :)
I totally agree with each circumstance presents it's own solutions. If I did more long term site projects, trailer would be my choice. The only thing about that, I was a supervisor for an OTR company that also sold Haulmark, Featherlite, Wells Cargo, and Pace trailers....durin the years I worked there I lost count of the trailers we had in for insurance claims to repair damage from contractors that literally lost EVERYTHING from being broken into at job sites. If somebody want in their gonna get in, I like taking things home with me so there's less chance of tools walking away. I got burned once, my insurance guy told me my tools would be covered under my home insurance or the homies home insurenace should somthing be stolen...time came when it happened (they just stole my brake) but then I was met with, "that's not covered" sad part is over half the contractors we fixed the trailers for that were broken into and lost everything were told the same thing :eek:

Insurance: Americas biggest LEGAL SCAM!!!
 

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By far the box truck is the way to go. I have had them all though the years....Equipment and Tools stored safe and dry....And a rolling bill board for free...Yes 10 mpg is not very good but its offset by the other things I mentioned.
 

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Bsecdone said:
I am not sure what to do. I am looking for the best way. Does a van draw more attention or a Trailer? I have a Jeep Wrangler. So that would be the tow truck if I did get a trailer.
But, I also see box trucks. They look like they would be a good option. It would be like home Depot on wheels.
I will buy a better truck for hauling once I start making some money. But my question is if the trailer would get more attention or would the Van? thanks
What are you trying to acomplish, what do you mean more attention? Like bad attention from theives or advertising? Obviously if the trailer was left at the site for a week at a time it is going to do a better job of advertising for you than the truck being there only during work hours, plus you can make the trailer into a billboard on wheels pretty easily.

What kind of work are you doing?
 

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Not jumping in to be sarcastic-honest-I'll take lack of job site exposure with a trailer left on site in trade for no fear of losing tools and getting trailer ruined while they attempt/succeed with breaking in when it's outta my sight....job site exposure....that's what my yard signs are for:)
 

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I have done the van and I would have to say trailor all the way. Right now I have a 16x7 trailor. Such ease unloading tools for the job with the ramp in back. I have a cut table on wheels built out of a truck box with all the tools I'll be using for that job. In the morning just open door roll out the table and go.
 

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Van if your are small. Extended van if you are a framer or finisher. Box truck for cabinet guys or commercial contractors. Pick ups are for guys who work in a specific area where highways don't become a factor. Trailers as needed.
 

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My vote is for the trailer, but you will need to know or learn fast how to back up a rig! FYI I am in the suburbs, City work might be better off with a Van or Box truck. I have a Pace 14' CargoSport trailer with a Ramp door and custom interior. I too love the ability to have ALL my tools on the job site and I am in the process of making a 8' roll out table that contains my table saw, router and Miter Saw. The front of the trailer is set up as a work bench with cabinets below and shelving above. I usually drop it at a job during the week and take it home on weekends if I am not going to be on site.

I'd love to see the pics of your trailer set ups. They won't let me post mine yet
 

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I'll see if I can run down a father/son team that do teak boat decks around here and get some pics. One of the cleanest setups that I have ever seen, they added a small door in the front so that they can rip through the center.
 

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CEF said:
By far the box truck is the way to go. I have had them all though the years....Equipment and Tools stored safe and dry....And a rolling bill board for free...Yes 10 mpg is not very good but its offset by the other things I mentioned.
Another vote for the box truck from one who also has had them all through the years, - - pick-ups, vans, trailers, utility bodies, you name 'em.

Just this morning (yes, Sunday), - - I locked in two bathrooms (over $20,000), - - from a fairly close 'neighbor', who originally called me only because of seeing my 'billboard on wheels' in my driveway.

Other than my lettered truck, I don't even advertise.
 
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