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I am working on a restoration project that requires filling large cracks (2"deep, 1-2" wide and up to 5ft long) in painted cedar beams. The beams will be repainted after filling. I have used Bondo in the past for similar smaller scale situations which has worked well. Given the scope of this project and time constraints I would prefer not to mix and fill with this much Bondo. Does anyone know of a filler that could be used to fill the majority of crack first and then coated with Bondo to finish? I had thought of using expanding foam, but this may react with the Bondo and leave a gap between coats. Any suggestions? Also note this is purely for aesthetic purposes, not structural. Thanks.
 

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Bondo

Ramblin,
I would advise against using Bondo because it is too rigid and hard and will not flex with the movement of wood. Bondo was designed for metal, although it does have it's place in small repair jobs. "Abitron" is one product that I have had success with in wood restoration. It is expensive, but even after drying it will flex and move with the seasonal movement of wood. It can be sanded, shaped, routed, stained and painted. It is a two part epoxy product. Just google Abitron. Good luck, builder49
 

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Ramblin,
I would advise against using Bondo because it is too rigid and hard and will not flex with the movement of wood. Bondo was designed for metal, although it does have it's place in small repair jobs. "Abitron" is one product that I have had success with in wood restoration. It is expensive, but even after drying it will flex and move with the seasonal movement of wood. It can be sanded, shaped, routed, stained and painted. It is a two part epoxy product. Just google Abitron. Good luck, builder49

In my experience, Bondo is good for about a year before the temperature and humidity cycles around here cause it to fail. We've been using either Abatron or West System marine epoxy for many years and have gotten great service from them both.
 

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Housewright & Woodwright
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This is the product I use with great success, and you can paint it as well.

Epoxy.com

Bondo is too stiff to move with the wood and would eventually loosen, crack, and fall out.
 
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Curmudgeon
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Ramblin,
I would advise against using Bondo because it is too rigid and hard and will not flex with the movement of wood. Bondo was designed for metal, although it does have it's place in small repair jobs. "Abitron" is one product that I have had success with in wood restoration. It is expensive, but even after drying it will flex and move with the seasonal movement of wood. It can be sanded, shaped, routed, stained and painted. It is a two part epoxy product. Just google Abitron. Good luck, builder49
Exactly.
This is the product for wood....
http://www.abatron.com/cms/building...estorationmaintenance/woodrestorationkit.html
It's the only one I know of approved
for historic restoration.
A whole 'nother animal compared
to Bondo. :thumbsup:
 

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Bondo sucks for wood, its too rigid, an it tends to shrink and crack overtime unless sealed. Plus you cannot put a nail or screw in it as it will crack out.

I agree 100% with the other posts above! I found out about the Abatron Liquid Wood and Wood Epox Filler at Conspec Materials here in Tampa, FL. Im sure you can find a Contractor Supply house similar to them in your local area that sells it. This stuff is amazing!! :thumbup: Its very plyable when you put it in place, and once cured you can sand, paint, stain just like real wood! I have been using it for several years, it much cheaper than replacing a historic "look" window to meet local codes.
 

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bondo inside, a.r.t. inside. can't post urls, so do a search for advanced repair technologies epoxy and you'll find it. problem with those is they take a long time to cure.
 

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I am working on a restoration project that requires filling large cracks (2"deep, 1-2" wide and up to 5ft long) in painted cedar beams. The beams will be repainted after filling. ........................................Any suggestions? Also note this is purely for aesthetic purposes, not structural. Thanks.
Them's big "cracks"; a 2x2 would fit in them.
How about wood with a glue interface?

Wood would have an identical expansion/contraction rate, could be mechanically fastened (nails/ screws) and glued and would have the same finishing and painting properties as the parent material.

Easy to sand and finish and probability of a longer lasting restoration quality repair.

willy
 

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The Dude
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I'm with Willy - I'd fill it with cedar, glue and nail it, then abitron the surface if you have to.
 
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