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What kind of paint would you recommend? The deck is adjacent to a pool and I live in Tampa Florida.
 

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Personally, I prefer CoolDeck. You could try a stain. If your heart is set on paint there are lots of them out there just be careful as many of them are slick and you may need to add nonskid. You don't want anyone coming out of the pool to crash and burn.
 
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Teetorbilt said:
Personally, I prefer CoolDeck. You could try a stain. If your heart is set on paint there are lots of them out there just be careful as many of them are slick and you may need to add nonskid. You don't want anyone coming out of the pool to crash and burn.
What about Porter Paints Concrete Acryllic Paints? Have you had any experience with Porter?
 
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Options for Concrete Deck

Hi- Your best bet if you are doing this yourself would be a concrete stain. They are formulated specifically for concrete and to hold up around the pool. Make sure you etch the concrete before applying any product to assure proper adhesion. Also you can add silica sand to the stain for the skid resistance. The paint stores carry this. Just make sure to do all the steps the manufacturer recommends and you will have no problems. I am a contractor in Tampa and we do a lot of repaints for Kool Deck. As far as Porter, haven't tried any of their products yet. So couldn't help ya there. And since I just found this board last week and still have to register, I'm not sure if I can say specific products for you to use. But good luck!
 

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This is not something that I do a lot of, I do it most often for my own use (shop floors). I like the stains because they penetrate and won't chip or peel like paints or even epoxy coatings. I have never found anything else that will stand up to the abuse that I give it.
The majority of my tools are the old, cast iron versions and are slid around on the floor. Carts and dollies are on steel wheels for less rolling resistance, they are frequently loaded with thousands of pounds. With stain, the wheels initially leave a white streak that soon disappears with foot traffic, everything else that I have tried has been destroyed. Another plus is that it does not alter the surface. A properly poured slab should not be slick, many surface coatings seal, fill and level the surface making non-skid a requirement.
 
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