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I am looking over a new in-floor radiant heat material. It's a very thin laminated material with carbon resistor ink - great for use under laminate, vinyl, and hardwood. It comes in rolls that can be cut to length, then the "cold leads" are crimped on and sealed either by the installer or by the supplier (which would be me.)

If only it were that easy. Looking over this material has thrown into question everything I thought I knew about electrical components and new construction. I guess I need a refresher course.

I sell a traditional "wire and fabric" electric radiant product. I always assumed it needed its UL label to be installed legally. I am now looking at four different carbon ink heater materials that are currently being installed in Canada and the U.S. Only one of them has a UL listing. Some are UL Recognized, some are tested to UL by a German company that I don't think is recognized in the U.S. as an NRTL, some have the CE mark (Euorope) but no testing to UL or CSA standards. And yet they are being sold and installed in the U.S. and Canada. Is this just lax enforcement, an inspector seeing that the only visible portion of the system, the thermostat, has the C-UL-US mark? Or is there a little more room in the law than I had thought?

I guess my shortest question is, the material I like the best is UL recognized (Not listed). Is it legal for a properly-trained installer to cut it to length and attach the cold leads himself? Without playing hide-the-heat from the inspector? The material bears the UR mark.

What are the governing standards, anyway?
 

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Fentoozler
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UL is probably the most well known listing agency, but by no means are they the only listing agency.
 
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