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Artisan Carpentry
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
These tips are so simple that they may not be noteworthy, but they both work well, and are free and easy.

First is a solution to the problem of mixing drywall mud in a new full bucket. With a full bucket, the addition of even a small amount of water, to get a nice consistency can result in a mess as the mud gets flung out of the bucket. I keep a bucket lid with a hole in it, add a little water, put the mixing paddle in the bucket and put the lid on the bucket for mixing.

It is also nice to be able to leave the mixing paddle in the bucket with the lid on, while working.

The lid also works like one of those popsicle drip catchers if you need to carry the mud covered paddle through the house to hose it off outside. :eek:)
 

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Artisan Carpentry
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
The other tip is to use a large drywall finishers corner sanding sponge as a scabbard for a drywall saw. These sanding sponges are a nice size for this, and of course, it protects both the saw and the other tools in the traditional bucket-based drywall tool kit. That it keeps the saw handle, standing up, in easy reach, is a bonus.

I posted these tips in "Carpentry" rather than "Drywall" since I'm not a real drywall guy and they may not be useful to real drywall folks... more for jacks of all trades.

Cheers,

Bass
 

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Another great tip, those painter canvasses or cheap self adhereing clear carpet protector so you dont have to go back through and vacuum up that mess you left:laughing:

Good tip in the bucket mixing though
 

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First one I saw quite a few years ago and thought it was a good idea at the time...Don't know why I never tried, must have forgot.

Second one is a good one. I hate reaching into the bucket and coming out minus skin because someone didn't put it back in slot that it's supposed to.

If only I could remember everything I ever knew:laughing: How many time have you done one of those once in a lifetime things only to find out that it was actually twice. Stand there scratching my head and say now how did I do that again:whistling

I generally keep a semi wet sponge in the bucket also to keep the edges of my bucket clean and booger free
 
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Artisan Carpentry
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Another great tip, those painter canvasses or cheap self adhereing clear carpet protector so you dont have to go back through and vacuum up that mess you left:laughing:

Good tip in the bucket mixing though
Yeah, I only had one drop cloth along that day (which is one drop cloth more than most trim carpenters bring to work). I had some small drywall patches to do. Put the drop down, cut the rock into pieces over the drop cloth, then picked up the drop cloth and moved it to where I was patching to catch the mud there. I had a minor amount of shop vac work to do, but no big deal.

The lid kept me out of trouble with the mixing I did over the carpet.

Cheers,

Bass
 

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If only I could remember everything I ever knew:laughing: How many time have you done one of those once in a lifetime things only to find out that it was actually twice. Stand there scratching my head and say now how did I do that again:whistling

Man oh man how many times have i been there! I always forget the great tips that save me time after i have done the job. You can only remember so much.
 

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I love both... especially the first one. Every single time I mix mud or concrete, I end up with my legs covered and my socks full.

One question though. How in the heck did you get that big mixing head down through that tiny hole in the lid? :party:
 

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Artisan Carpentry
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I love both... especially the first one. Every single time I mix mud or concrete, I end up with my legs covered and my socks full.

One question though. How in the heck did you get that big mixing head down through that tiny hole in the lid? :party:

LOL... good one Willie.:laughing:

If you try mixing with the lid on, let me know if you like it.:thumbsup:

All the best,

Bass
 

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Bass, I love the lid idea, if only that lid had a chute where you could add water or compound to adjust the mix....and maby a clear bucked to check for dry patches and consistency.

As for the blade guard, get a retractable drywall saw they rock.
 

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Since we're talking drywall, here's a cool tip I learned in the DW forum. Mix some blue chalk into your touch up mud, so you can find the spots for sanding.
 

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Since we're talking drywall, here's a cool tip I learned in the DW forum. Mix some blue chalk into your touch up mud, so you can find the spots for sanding.
And whatever you do, don't use food colouring, paint will not cover it. Found out the hard way, had to Binns all the touch ups.

I forget who suggested the food colouring to me, but be warned :censored:
 

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I love that bucket trick that would also work good when mixing thinset. Thats one of those you look back and say why didn't I think of that?
 
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