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Punching above his weight
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Query for you.

Got metal studs over brick, 1/2" rock over top. The TV mount itself is one of those little fellers with only two vertically oriented screw holes. Ideally, lags into wood stud. TV is like 30"+. Extendable mount. A lot of downward pretty.

Think if I were to get a piece of 3/4 ply and get 4 toggles into two studs, then attach the mount to the 3/4 that it would do the trick?

Anybody encountered this pickle before?

Thanks as always.
 

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Easy Gibson said:
Query for you. Got metal studs over brick, 1/2" rock over top. The TV mount itself is one of those little fellers with only two vertically oriented screw holes. Ideally, lags into wood stud. TV is like 30"+. Extendable mount. A lot of downward pretty. Think if I were to get a piece of 3/4 ply and get 4 toggles into two studs, then attach the mount to the 3/4 that it would do the trick? Anybody encountered this pickle before? Thanks as always.
used to work hanging TVs, it was often when we dealt with metal studs depending on the weight of the tv we would just use toggles rated for way more than the tv weight in to the drywall. Could of time we on commercial jobs prior to drywall we would have 3/4" plywood put behind the drywall and lag into that, seemed to work great.
 

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used to work hanging TVs, it was often when we dealt with metal studs depending on the weight of the tv we would just use toggles rated for way more than the tv weight in to the drywall. Could of time we on commercial jobs prior to drywall we would have 3/4" plywood put behind the drywall and lag into that, seemed to work great.
I would have a hard time trusting drywall to hold my TV. Of course, I wouldn't trust lag screws either, as I like my TV too much. I use a stand.

I'm not saying it doesn't work, as you obviously made it work many times. Did you just run toggles straight through the drywall?
 

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VinylHanger said:
I would have a hard time trusting drywall to hold my TV. Of course, I wouldn't trust lag screws either, as I like my TV too much. I use a stand. I'm not saying it doesn't work, as you obviously made it work many times. Did you just run toggles straight through the drywall?
on one side yes, we would typically try to catch at least one stud,
 

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GC/carpenter
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I would have no problem ripping out the drywall and installing blocking from stud to stud, first. Possibly wide blocking to fit into the channel of the metal stud as to get appropriate fastening on the blocking. That way you can put any size TV there in the future if they ever wanted to upgrade.
 

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Query for you.

Got metal studs over brick, 1/2" rock over top. The TV mount itself is one of those little fellers with only two vertically oriented screw holes. Ideally, lags into wood stud. TV is like 30"+. Extendable mount. A lot of downward pretty.

Think if I were to get a piece of 3/4 ply and get 4 toggles into two studs, then attach the mount to the 3/4 that it would do the trick?

Anybody encountered this pickle before?

Thanks as always.
That's overkill for a 30" TV. Put a bead of silicone on the back plate of the mount and drive 2x #14 screws into the metal stud.
 

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I'm a Mac
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I mounted 3/4" plywood 24"x40" behind my office TV, it is an old 60" Plasma and weighs 160 lbs. it has 4 screws on each of the steel studs it covers.

The puppy is heavy and no movement yet.
 

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Punching above his weight
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Awesome crowdsourcing work guys. Thanks.

Inner, you're a wild man. I'd never be able to sleep knowing that TV only had two screws holding it to a metal stud.

I asked and they told me they specifically didn't want to open the wall and install blocking. They didn't want to pay for the extra time fixing the hole and I didn't want to fix the hole for free. So, yeah. I think we're going to toggle our way to victory.

Should be exciting. At least I'm going to keep telling myself that until it's over. hah
 

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Easy Gibson said:
Awesome crowdsourcing work guys. Thanks. Inner, you're a wild man. I'd never be able to sleep knowing that TV only had two screws holding it to a metal stud. I asked and they told me they specifically didn't want to open the wall and install blocking. They didn't want to pay for the extra time fixing the hole and I didn't want to fix the hole for free. So, yeah. I think we're going to toggle our way to victory. Should be exciting. At least I'm going to keep telling myself that until it's over. hah
I think you going to be fine with toggles. Think about what would have to happen for them to fail. It would take a pretty good force to pull a toggle through.
 

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Inner, you're a wild man. I'd never be able to sleep knowing that TV only had two screws holding it to a metal stud.
Several hundred pounds of shear and pullout with just those two screws. Then the adhesive strength of the silicone. Keep in mind, the mount is attached to the TV with a few small machine screws that are threaded a small fraction of an inch in.
 

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Awesome crowdsourcing work guys. Thanks.

Inner, you're a wild man. I'd never be able to sleep knowing that TV only had two screws holding it to a metal stud.

I asked and they told me they specifically didn't want to open the wall and install blocking. They didn't want to pay for the extra time fixing the hole and I didn't want to fix the hole for free. So, yeah. I think we're going to toggle our way to victory.

Should be exciting. At least I'm going to keep telling myself that until it's over. hah
I've seen two TVs fall, one I got to witness first hand. Both were articulated arm brackets, the one I saw was a 55" TV and the installer hit the edge of the stud with the top lag bolts, the other was a single stud and the fastener was over tightened and the head popped off.

Screw in a swing arm to a metal stud with an aggressive screw without over tightening and you will be able to do chin-ups on it.
 

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Several hundred pounds of shear and pullout with just those two screws. Then the adhesive strength of the silicone. Keep in mind, the mount is attached to the TV with a few small machine screws that are threaded a small fraction of an inch in.
The connection to the TV is always the weakest point, especially since the metal frame inside the TV strips easily...but in the case of an articulated arm bracket you are putting a significant cantilever load on the top fastener (that's why you should use a good bracket like a Premier that accepts more than two fasteners, their single TV mount has two at the top, one center and one bottom).
 

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GC/carpenter
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The older flat screens are much heavier, as well. I have a 2007 or 08 samsung that's pretty bulky but it was a good tv for its time. It just won't die!
 

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Toggles are fine if you get them into the metal studs, with a standard flush mount. But since you're installing an extending arm mount, think about the force on the toggles when the arm is extended all the way out.
 

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Toggles are fine if you get them into the metal studs, with a standard flush mount. But since you're installing an extending arm mount, think about the force on the toggles when the arm is extended all the way out.
If a toggler pulls through it takes the entire wall down with it. Try it out for yourself.
 

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If a toggler pulls through it takes the entire wall down with it. Try it out for yourself.
You're probably right, I just like to be on the safe side. Perhaps use a next larger size toggle so the screw is strong. I've installed a few articulating mounts in wood stud walls with lags, and only one into metal studs, which I cut the drywall and slid in 2 foot long 2x4's into the metal studs and lagged the mount. Overkill perhaps, but I'm paranoid in earth quick country. :whistling
 

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One thing you need to take in consideration is if that mount is rated for a 32" - 55" you need to assume it will be used for a 55" regardless of what you install. Liabilities are important to consider. I can see it now in court "Mr. Contractor did you install a tv mount that was rated for a 55" TV? " you get the picture. HO will assume he can hang a tv that his mount is rated for.
 

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You're probably right, I just like to be on the safe side. Perhaps use a next larger size toggle so the screw is strong. I've installed a few articulating mounts in wood stud walls with lags, and only one into metal studs, which I cut the drywall and slid in 2 foot long 2x4's into the metal studs and lagged the mount. Overkill perhaps, but I'm paranoid in earth quick country. :whistling
A small toggler uses a 3/16 machine screw, a 30" TV uses a VESA 100MM bolt pattern which uses 4x M4 machine screws...the two M4 screws will strip before the toggle even breaks a sweat.

One thing you need to take in consideration is if that mount is rated for a 32" - 55" you need to assume it will be used for a 55" regardless of what you install. Liabilities are important to consider. I can see it now in court "Mr. Contractor did you install a tv mount that was rated for a 55" TV? " you get the picture. HO will assume he can hang a tv that his mount is rated for.
For the most part small TV mounting patterns use VESA standards, anything over 42" is non-standard unless we are talking about a select few new TVs. In other words you won't be mounting a 30" TV on a bracket that says 32-55"...in fact you probably won't even find a bracket that says 32-55" and if you did it would be an orphan universal style.

Besides I wouldn't be the one in court, I would hand that directly over to my insurance company and let them deal with it.
 
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