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I always subbed out finishing Sheetrock. But I decided to try at my house tying new ceiling Sheetrock into plastered ceiling. I freaking suck at it. Slow. Using 20 min working time mud. Urgggg. It's going to turn out fine. But I believe I will get someone else to do next time
 

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I always subbed out finishing Sheetrock. But I decided to try at my house tying new ceiling Sheetrock into plastered ceiling. I freaking suck at it. Slow. Using 20 min working time mud. Urgggg. It's going to turn out fine. But I believe I will get someone else to do next time
But it's so much fun! I don't think anyone picks it up the first time... Or the second.
 

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I always subbed out finishing Sheetrock. But I decided to try at my house tying new ceiling Sheetrock into plastered ceiling. I freaking suck at it. Slow. Using 20 min working time mud. Urgggg. It's going to turn out fine. But I believe I will get someone else to do next time

Screw the Hot mud.

Best to use general purpose out of the bucket, especially for the first few times. Easier to work with more forgiving. Has some push back on the knife and doesn't sand like easy sand light weight.

Yes taping is stupid easy right? :no:
 

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Screw the Hot mud.

Best to use general purpose out of the bucket, especially for the first few times. Easier to work with more forgiving. Has some push back on the knife and doesn't sand like easy sand light weight.

Yes taping is stupid easy right? :no:
Listen to T-Wax. Biggest part of the reason you're having a hard time is because you are using the wrong mud. Hot mud way harder to work with and a PIA to sand. If you are using 20 you are shooting yourself in the foot and guaranteeing a crappy/miserable job right off the get go.

Get a bucket of general purpose (green lid) for your first two coats. Then use topping compound (blue lid) for your third/final coat. It is lighter weight and sands really nice. If you take this advice it will go 10x better.
 

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If you're just starting, there's a good chance your tools don't have the right curve to them for the stiffness of what you're using. This isn't a big problem with trowels (they can get messed up, but not as easily), but there is no knife I've seen ready for use as bought. I've also seen knives that no matter what you do, the darn thing always goes back to some odd shape.
 

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My only comment on hot mud vs premix is hot mud if mixed by directions tends to be pretty stiff. I use trowels for any stiff stuff. The curves on all my knives are set for thinned premix.

I use LaFarge medium weight a lot.
 

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Odds are you are also using too much mud per application & over working it.
Griz mentioned this probably because EVERBODY makes these mistakes at first, until they learn to control how much mud goes on and where.
 

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Let's see pics!

Guys who tape for a living are doing 100,000s of feet a year, and they aren't very good after the first 100,000.
 

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Smithanator said:
I always subbed out finishing Sheetrock. But I decided to try at my house tying new ceiling Sheetrock into plastered ceiling. I freaking suck at it. Slow. Using 20 min working time mud. Urgggg. It's going to turn out fine. But I believe I will get someone else to do next time
Get a power sander. Beats sanding the mud off by hand. I avoided muddying as much as I could. I sucked at it. But since no one wants to do a job under 50 sheets I had to learn. Now I'm up there with the best of them. Very little sanding now. Just practice , practice , and practic.
 

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Tips

Now that we teased you a bit, here are the most useful beginner's tips I learned.

1)Most important is don't let the mud get all the way to the edges of the knife. Wipe of a good inch off each side. Otherwise it smears past edges and leaves a ridge.
2) Keep the mud at the tip of your knife. Not too much either, and once it starts sliding down towards the handle too much, reload knife and start again.
3) Every little while (depending on mud, humidity, temp etc.) when the knife gets a little crusty, wipe it clean with a damp sponge.. Otherwise u get little boogers that leave streaks when you pull the mud across.
Cleanliness is Godliness with mudding.
4) Most new mudders put it on too much and too thick. They usually put an obscense amount of mud on the wall.
5) When u start with the beginner bucket mud, thin it out a little even on the taping coat. And each coat after usually gets a little thinner.
Mix it well with some water til it's very smooth. Make sure there's no chunks

That's a few important pointers that'll help.
 

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I hate chunks. You lay the most perfect mud only to see a line down the mud. Then you have to decide do I try again or leave it and catch it the next day.
 

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I hate chunks. You lay the most perfect mud only to see a line down the mud. Then you have to decide do I try again or leave it and catch it the next day.
I only like chunky women, Not mud. :jester:

I'll scrape the mud off the wall if you get chunks then clean the knife and quarantine the suspect mud. Scrape it to one part of pan where you keep the chunky stuff.

Also lots of times with bucket mud if it isn't pretty fresh you'll have to scrape a layer off the top. I like to add a couple cups of water on top of the mud bucket and it keeps it fresher. Keep the bucket sides clean too. And the plastic on top of the mud don't let get crusty.
Sponge off the sides etc.
 
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